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8

The language of the text is Hungarian. Mainly using an online translator and dictionary and the word list linked by @ColeValleyGirl, I came up with the following: Hazasultak: marriage A jegyesek: the bridal pair (i.e. bride and groom) Sorszám: (registration) number Esküvési év, hónap és nap: wedding year, month and day vezeték- és keresztneve: family name ...


6

If you're willing to put in a little time and effort, it's possible you don't need the indexes. You linked to the Hungary Civil Registration collection here: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1452460 That page contains a very long list of document collections, organized by town or location of origin. As Budapest is large relative to the other ...


5

The sounds [polɑvt͡ʃɛk] would be written Polavcsek in modern Hungarian; [pɑlovt͡ʃɛk] would be Palovcsek. However, surnames often preserve archaic spellings, and in any case nobody paid much attention to exact spellings of names before the 20th century. (In a world where illiteracy was normal, it was only the sound of a surname that mattered.) Focusing on ...


5

This is a stub of an answer which will be added to as I find more resources. I'll write out a Research Plan to give you some ideas. You may have done a lot of this already, and if you have, feel free to add to your question. But I'll start from scratch, so the information may also help someone coming along later. Since you asked specifically about Jewish ...


4

I don't think the word "sham" applies, and no, it was not a common or widespread practice. Your example has the second and third cases of adult adoption that I have encountered in ten years of Hungarian genealogy research. Based on what I can find online, such adoption contracts were usually between a childless older adult and a younger adult, and they were ...


3

Before the start of civil registration, vital records were the responsibility of churches. According to Dvorzsák's gazetteer (https://kt.lib.pte.hu/cgi-bin/kt.cgi?konyvtar/kt03110501/0_0_1_pg_14.html), Jewish residents of Gecse in Abaúj-Torna county were recorded in Szina (Abaújszina, now Seňa, Slovakia). Unfortunately, FamilySearch does not appear to have ...


3

Searching on JewishGen is not the same thing as asking questions on the (free) e-mail mailing lists of JewishGen. Researchers on the lists may know about sources that no one has bothered to transcribe and put online yet. (There are lots of sources like that…) I would definitely ask your question on the main JewishGen e-mail list, as well as the Hungary-...


2

I believe it's trying to be Ómalomsok, which was in Győr county, a few miles from that little corner where Sopron, Vas, Veszprém, and Győr counties met. The village was combined with Újmalomsok in 1950 to make Malomsok, and it's now in Veszprém county. The 1913 gazetteer says the civil registry office was in Újmalomsok; FamilySearch has those records ...


1

Not a definitive answer ... Since the record is mosty typed: there is little handwriting to interpret. The placename is spelled Ormalonsok on the image, which can't be found with that spelling. Options from the columns on the right-hand page: Passports for the family were issued in Veszprém. Archives there might have records of those documents. Visually ...


1

My father's original birth certificate (b. 1951, March 3 in Budapest IV) My grandparent's marriage certificate (location and date unknown, though date most probably somewhere between 1945 - 1950) The answer to these two questions is that you need to request the certificates from the Hungarian authorities. Possibly, an official enquiry with all details of ...


1

When you are trying to understand the records on FamilySearch, here are some ways to get more information. Record Type articles in the FamilySearch Research Wiki Searching the name of a country plus the term "genealogy" will get you to the top-level article on doing research for that country. In the right-hand sidebar, choose the type of record ...


1

The name is Pál, not Pól. If your father was roughly the same age as your mother, then his birth records will not be publicly available for decades yet. Some archives in Hungary use the current law as an excuse to lock birth records for 135 years. Marriage records are supposed to become public after 75 years, but some archivists are applying 105 years in an ...


1

It's a bit of a guess, but I'm bold and adding this as answer rather than a comment. I think it is Kysak (Hungarian: Sároskőszeg) half-way between Prešov and Košice. Rationale: The first writer had a tendency to move letters that near together so that they might appear as one. You see this for example with "Austria" on line 10 where s and t nearly ...


1

REGISTER OF MARRIAGES Consecutive number Year, month, and day of wedding The couple's sur- and given name and civil status, along with the sur- and given name and civil status of the parents birthplace and residence, street and house-number religion age status single widow, widower Sur- and given name, civil status and religion of witnesses Sur- and ...


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