12

Very simply, an illegitimate child whose father did not consent to being included on the certificate (from 1875, if the child was illegitimate the father had to be present at the birth registration to be named; before that the mother could name a father but it wasn't verified), or an illegitimate child whose father was 'unknown' would not have a father's ...


10

The workhouse in England (or Wales) was not somewhere anybody wanted to linger, but it was often the only choice for a single pregnant woman about to have her baby who could not "lie-in" (give birth) where she was living (e.g. as a domestic servant) and did not have any family to go to (or did not want them to know her 'shame'). If the child was healthy and ...


7

An archaic meaning of spurious was illegitimate. See: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/spurious


6

Unless a specific line needs to addressed further, the transcript is as complete as possible at this time. (Image unavoidable, tables not possible here). "?" where unsure. s/o = struck out Notes: conf. = confirmiert, confirmed; dates are mostly Sundays after Easter, named for the traditional text [1. Quasimodogeniti, 2. Misericordia, 3. Jubilate, 4. ...


5

No, it is dangerous to speculate that Joseph may have been the father. Although it is not stated what these "papers" are, I suspect these records are bastardy bonds. Joseph was simply a bondsman. Bastardy bonds existed to prevent the parish from having to pay for the upkeep of an illegitimate child. Typically the bastardy bond would bind the reputed father (...


4

There is no single best way to do this but in my research I have come across some similar situations including for some close family as well as had people reach out to me trying to establish a connection to someone who 'may' be related to me. It is not clear exactly what you are hoping to gain from making the connection, and in whatever approach you take I ...


3

My great grandmother was in a similar situation in workhouses in London, I wondered a similar question. I discovered she relied heavily on her sisters as well as the workhouse's related "receiving homes" to temporarily house her children while she had my grandfather. The other children remained in the receiving homes longer after she left the workhouse, so ...


3

Rather than a lawyer, which might give the wrong impression, I would suggest you look for someone who provides counselling and intermediary services for adoption reunions. While your family's case is not technically one of adoption, such a person will be used to handling similar circumstances - where the birth mother has passed away and the surviving ...


3

Here's the checklist I use when when trying to find records about a place or topic: Learn what records might have been created in a particular time and place. Research which of those records might still exist, and which records are accessible to the public. Research what repositories might hold those records. Research which online repositories might hold ...


2

Yes, the information provided on the document suggests that John was probably illegitimate. However, don't assume anything. The only way to verify whether this is true is by finding additional evidence. The informant's name appears to be Cordell P. Tindell, and you can verify this by using other resources such as census records.


2

As commented by @HarryVervet: I think the sojourner part of your question is answered here: Meaning of term Sojourner on 1794 Marriage Record at Marystow (Devon) for John Creber? Consequently, I'll address this part of your question (and leave the likelihood of illegitimacy in the scenario that you cite to another answerer): Looking at a map, would ...


2

This is an improved family record of my ancestor August Hermann Friedrich Brackenhammer: This is the familiy table of my ancestors of that time:


1

I have not yet sighted the original document but I now know where it is located and that the bond value was £100. Reference: RO/4218 Description: Eliz. Jenkin, single, now with child. Bond: Wm. Hockin, lab., Rich. Hockin, cordwainer, Jos. Billin, taylor. £100. Date: 24 Nov. 1806 Held by: Cornwall Record Office, not available at The National Archives


1

There are cases in Germany where the parents are contractually obligated to pass the mother's surname on to all or some of their children. It could be connected to an ancestor's dowry or to a piece of land the family purchased, leased, or inherited. An example of my Jostpille family can be seen continuing through the female line in my answer to this ...


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