9

If you are on Facebook, there is a closed and private group called 'South African Genealogy' that has lots of helpful and active members who know their way around the South African information sites. Join up, make a post with as much info as you have, and you should get dozens of responses within a few hours to day or so....or you can research yourself. ...


9

Entries on passenger manifests were lined out when the passengers did not sail, were changed to a different class of travel, or did not embark or disembark at the port stated on the manifest header. See Marian L. Smith's article A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations at JewishGen.org. The information you want is on the page Markings on the ...


9

The immigration visa number (8) is the number used to account for visas issued by the US Department of State at each consulate. This one is the 8th visa issued by the consulate at Stockholm for that year. Note there would also be a visa number 8 issued in London, another number 8 issued at Shanghai, and likely a number 8 issued from every consulate that ...


8

Since this record is fairly modern (1957) it seems likely those references are similar to, or the same as, the modern visa categories. Most of the entries on that page have a C-1 visa, which is a transit visa that only permits immediate onward travel to another country, and all of these have a destination in Canada, which is consistent with that. B-2 is ...


8

There are multiple approaches to this problem -- here are my recommendations for how to go about the search. Important note: Do not assume there is only one passenger list -- many families had family members who went back and forth multiple times before settling in the USA. Find your great-grandfather's arrival (and find his naturalization records, if any ...


8

I have great news for you. :) A 24 years old single man called Pedro Penalba Agueda arrived in Buenos Aires on 1930/03/18. The ship was "Conte Rosso". You can run the search here: https://cemla.com/buscador/ Note that the last name appears as "Penalba", not Ñ but N. This could be an error when he arrived, or an electronic misspelling when loading the ...


7

One possible avenue of research is to look for Naturalization records. You have the certificate and you know the court which issued it. The National Archives' introductory section on finding Naturalization records is here: http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/#find For records prior to 1906, they say: "Contact the State Archives for the state ...


7

The book They Came in Ships by John Phillip Colletta has a flowchart. He suggests starting with the following: Your ancestor's full, real name the approximate age at arrival the approximate date of arrival From there he suggests different types of searches, depending on the time period, and the other information you may have, such as the port of entry, ...


7

You omitted links to the passenger list: at ellisisland.org, the entry is indexed "Andres Glavac" at ancestry.com, the entry is indexed "Andres Giavac" (3 times!) Column 11 (departure contact) sister: Glavac Ana Cze[rc?]socz Hung. Column 18 (destination contact) br.i.l. [S?]obocan Martin 19[9?]. 201 Erie St. So Chicago Ill. The placename in column 11 is ...


7

I've left in my wrong turns below on purpose, to show the process of genealogical research and how to build evidence. This manifest is both correct and a red herring. It led me to some hypotheses that didn't pan out. To read about the path that led to the answer, go down an entire section, to "I'm getting nowhere fast." The full page is on FamilySearch (...


7

There is no correct spelling of your surname. Sure, there is now. It's Wasmanski. Unless one of your modern-day relatives spell it differently, and they might. It is possible your current spelling is a change from another established spelling. It is possible the other spelling is a mistake (also be sure you're looking at the original document and not a ...


6

The basic premise in family history is to start with what you know, and work backwards and outwards from that point in small increments to discover more. You want to be able to say with confidence, when you recognize a record associated with your relative, that you are looking at something that was recorded about your relative and not someone else with the ...


6

Image access FYI - Access to the Cook County collections was removed in 2013, because of contract changes. The images I downloaded before that from the marriage collection were all marriage licenses, with little more information than the index. Images for the "Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920" collection can now be accessed by ordering the ...


6

There are records pertaining to the Milwaukee and Detroit customs houses at the National Archives. See Record Group 36.3: http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/036.html#36.3 36.3 Records of Customhouses 1745, 1762-1982 36.3.1 Records of customhouses and collection districts 36.3.2 Records relating to passenger arrivals 36.3.1 Records ...


6

Yesterday, online records related to the Kindertransport children became available through FindMyPast: This is a fascinating collection of digitised government documents relating to the Kindertransport operation, dating from 1939 to 1945, held by The National Archives. The records may reveal when and where your ancestor arrived in Britain. This is ...


6

It appears to read: Female cousin. Theresa C. Te?r?eira 868 Broad Street. Central Falls where the ? might be j or f There is a Theresa Kelly Feireira in the Rhode Island marriages.


6

The "Instructions to Enumerators" for the 1920 census include the following instruction in the second paragraph, titled Definite answers: Definite answers - Try to get a definite answer to each inquiry according to the instructions herein given. But if after every effort you can not obtain the desired information write "Un" (for unknown).


5

My advice to anyone trying to connect an immigrant ancestor back to the country of origin is to start by thoroughly documenting the life of the person in the USA first. You want to have enough information that when you are ready to work your way back to Germany, you'll recognize that you have the right person and not someone with the same name. Collecting ...


5

Where else might information be lurking about these births and deaths? Death Records and Cemetery Information The Family History Library has a Register of New York City death records (update: this is no longer available to read online) describing what records the FHL holds. I haven't read the entire 209-page document yet, but when I was skimming it, this ...


5

This is a very common and frustratingly undocumented annotation on Ellis Island passenger manifests but after a thorough review, I believe I have determined the meaning. My belief is that the 'S' stands for sojourn as in a 'protracted sojourn' as opposed to 'in transit' or 'transient'. In addition to wanting to document whether a person/family had a ticket ...


5

Note: this answer pertains to the question as it was originally asked, and not necessarily to its edited form. The question was how to find any surviving relatives of Phillip Post (who came from Eltville near Frankfurt around 1860) who might have served in WWII. The usual recommendation for studying your family history is to start with yourself and to work ...


5

First, you need to know if she was married before or after immigration. Since you know the date of her second marriage in the US, you should look for US Census records around that time. My great grandfather was a Danish immigrant, and on the 1900 US census, there's a column indicating the year of immigration: In his case, it says 1892. You can then search ...


5

The image shown in the question is from Ancestry's Belgium, Antwerp Police Immigration Index, 1840-1930. In the About section, one is directed to FamilySearch's wiki page, Belgium, Antwerp, Police Immigration (FamilySearch Historical Records) According to the FamilySearch wiki page, only the locality appears between the name and the birthdate. I don't see ...


5

Your grandparents immigrated to New Zealand in 1951. Passenger List is viewable at https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KLBP-4T7 Cazaro born 12 Sept 1918 in Pančevo, Yugoslavia (now Serbia). Iordana born 10 June 1920 in Brăila, Romania Both are listed as Romanian citizens of the Orthodox religion. It appears they were WWII refugees and made their ...


5

I think you have identified the correct passenger list, being the SS City of Washington departing from Liverpool and arriving in New York on 19 Jun 1860. The relevant excerpt shows Susan (50), Eliz[abeth] (24), Anna (25), Thomas (23), Richard (16), and Susan (5): I can see why Richard might be mistaken as age 11, but after comparing it to the other 6s and ...


5

Let's look at the nature of the source first, using the Evidence Analysis Process Map, keeping in mind the elements of the Genealogical Proof Standard and other good genealogical practices. On the EE website, in the discussion Citing transcribed records - document or database in the Citation issues forum, Elizabeth Shown Mills talks about the problem of how ...


5

Let's start by clarifying some points in your question. Passenger Lists Passenger lists for this period (Castle Garden) are US Customs lists rather than immigration lists as we see from the Port of New York in the 20th century. We should keep in mind that passenger lists were usually made at the departure port, and it is possible that your immigrant may ...


5

This is a common question for beginning genealogists. However, the emphasis on the correct spelling of a name is a relatively recent phenomenon. Even if you could determine a preferential spelling for your husband's family, that wouldn't help you find his ancestors -- and it might make it less likely. Most of the material we use for studying genealogy and ...


5

There are naturalisation case papers at The National Archives for an Isaac Gabriel of Woolwich dated 1882 which seem likely to be for the same man. Those should give some background about him and his birthplace/parents: Nationality and Naturalisation: Isaac Gabriel. From Russia. Resident in Woolwich.... TNA reference - HO 144/94/A13526 Naturalisation ...


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