6

The Delaware Military History organization may have some useful material, including pictures and camp activity reports and newsletters. The National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) has basic records of German POW's held in the US. When the soldier was repatriated, their personnel record was given to the country for which they fought. Within that ...


5

One place you could start is with TNA's research guide on How to Look for Courts martial and desertion in the British Army 17th-20th centuries (tip courtesy of David Underdown on Twitter). Make a timeline of the events, combining the entries from the Service at Home and Abroad page: and the page Statement of the Services which you've posted above: ...


5

The OP notes a record on Ancestry that describes Philip Rule's discharge from Bodmin jail in 1839. It does not give a reason for incarceration, nor a committal date. This appears to be the only record on that site for Philip in Bodmin. The timing of, and reasons for, his jailing may be found in the aforementioned Pocock database, but there is a chance that ...


5

Regarding "maybe it means that he served it and came back", The Victorian Crime and Punishment site notes that: "there was no procedure for return after the sentence expired" "Only a handful ever came back to Britain". Wikipedia also states that a released convict "had to make his own way back", which would presumably be unaffordable for most ex-cons. ...


5

I think you'll find it's actually Trespass Damaging underwood fine / 2 (I'm assuming it is the second of the two similar offences shown) "Underwood" in this contest was the small trees & shrubs that grew beneath the taller timber trees. If the fine wasn't paid, then a prison sentence would follow. This is what I suspect has happened to your ...


4

There is a report of the case in the Royal Cornwall Gazette (15th Nov 1834) and concerns debt of £400-£500 by obtaining cattle from farmers on credit. The court "considered this a very fraudulent case and directed the insolvent to be remanded in order to his producing a fair debtor and creditor account ..."


4

A great many records can be generated as a result of a person being accused and tried for a crime. To evaluate these records properly, it helps to find all the records you can that pertain to the crime(s) and study them as a group. Some guides to help you get started: Prison/Hulk/Gaol Registers (Crime & Criminals) (Including Scotland) at GenGuide.co.uk ...


3

This is a suggestion for further research, so it will by necessity be a stub of an answer. My plan would be to set the records aside for a period of time, and then review all the collected material as a group -- and here's the important part -- with the assumption that each record belongs to a different George Wills until you have information that suggests ...


3

Unfortunately, "Schmidt" in all it's variants is a quite common name in Austria. How you wrote it it may be also be more common for a German person. Providing more detailed information about the person may help. Regarding the POW camp I believe you mean "Longbridge Camp, Hampton Lovett, Droitwich, Worcester". The National Archives holds some information ...


2

So I had a bit of a ponder during a long drive, and did some more reading. I do hope that self-answering doesn't have a coherency/rambling ratio threshold… Anyway, the Marshalsea records are a substantial, if rather unwieldy, data set. So maybe it can yield more than it already has. First, the committal record. I couldn't find clear, contemporary ...


2

I contacted the Red Cross a few years ago when they were offering this service. I just gave them my Father in Law's name and date of birth and they sent me the data (well actually my wife had to do it as she was related not me). I hope this helps, unfortunately you will have to wait for the records to become available again.


1

You will not be able to access them until 2048. Federal prison records less than 72 years old are exempt from the Freedom of Information Act under subsection (b)(6). To quote from National Archives guidelines, "this type of record might include medical information, personal financial data, Social Security numbers, intimate details of an individual's ...


1

The answer by @AndyW mentions that the George Wills imprisoned at Bodmin, who was also transported to Bermuda, had siblings named Jane, Thomas and Mary, and also a brother-in-law Thomas Adams. I am confident that I have now identified that family, and that my 3rd great grandfather George Wills is a different man. This appears to be the birth family of ...


1

The FamilyHistory.co.uk website have a section dedicated to Cornwall Family History - http://www.familyhistory.co.uk/cornwall-family-history/ They include details of Cornwall Record Office and they might be worth contacting. They also include details of the local Cornwall Newspaper Archives and the dates covered. The Royal Cornwall Gazette covers the ...


1

I have been researching my late father's story which is similar. He was conscripted into the Soviet Army from Azerbaijan, captured by the Germans, then served in the German army as many of the Muslim troops did when the Germans offered the choice of fighting against Stalin. But - they actually sent them to the western front and not the eastern front ...


1

If we accept the assumption that all four references are to the same person (and I would like to see stronger evidence of that) then there are grounds for believing that the man in question was an habitual criminal. It is quite feasible that, at some time between the reprieve and the scheduled date of departure, he committed a further offence while being ...


1

Local archives in any given burgh often hold the police records for their jurisdiction, a copy of which would have been sent to the NRS/NAS. Unfortunately, most of the prison records have not been digitized so you would need to hire a genealogist in Scotland to assist you in accessing the records.


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