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9

Here are the questions that I would investigate, that might help determine who this extra household member was: Have you looked at the census page image to verify it was indexed correctly? This is the most frequent issue. Are there any notes in the margin beside this entry, that point to another page or another family? Indexers almost always ignore these, ...


7

I agree that a second marriage is the most likely explanation. Snyder/Snider is not much of a difference. Do you have any further records for the elder children, Alice and Edward, such as their marriages or deaths? That may show the name of their mother. Maybe they will mention their possible stepmother (Martha) rather than Mary Green/Greer, but given ...


4

From the information provided it sounds like she likely died in Iowa in the 1930s; this falls within the state of Iowa's currently available public death certificate request timeframe. As of February 2016 this is up through 1938. I would recommend requesting a copy of her Death Certificate from the Iowa History website or the applicable county records. The ...


3

(Some of this answer was previously posted as an answer to the question How to find wife's maiden name in New England in the 1700s?, but I have added material which is specific to Iowa.) The Family Search Wiki has several reference articles on researching women ancestors. Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online course Research: ...


3

Census records are highly useful, as we well know. However, the data is only as good as its source. It's not only the enumerators that got things scrambled, but the informants as well. I have no source for this, but I suspect that most errors can be laid at the feet of informants, though they did not mean to leave us befuddled. Even when the informant ...


2

I think it's important to remember that for genealogy, the historical records we use were created for another purpose. Understanding that purpose is key to getting the most out of the information inside our sources. You can learn more about the 1940 Census by looking at research guides like the offerings at The US Census Bureau or the US National ...


2

When searching for a person's burial (in whatever place or country), there are often a couple of "routes" you may have to try out to find this information. A good place to start (as you have already done) is looking for a gravestone on various sites like Find-A-Grave. Also take a look at more local websites like the Iowa Gravestone Photo Project and ...


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