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12

Short version: Almost certainly not. Long version: To find out the rules of inheritance for a Irish peerage*, you would need to check the letters patent. These will specify how the inheritance takes place (the limitation on the remainder). For the most part, the inheritance is only through legitimate male heirs (heirs male of the body). This means ...


11

I can't read the script yet. But we can say what it meant - if you look at the vertical annotation to the right, it explains that the registrations were cancelled because the qualification of the informant was not stated. Births and deaths in the English / Welsh registration system, and apparently the Irish I see from the image here, can only be reported by ...


10

Counkilla or Ceancullig (Gaelic: Ceann Coille) is located just north of Drimoleague. It is a townland in Drimoleague parish. Clearly there are numerous spelling variations of this place that you may find, some more phonetic, some more true to its Gaelic origin. See the entry for Ceancullig on Townlands.ie for more information about this location. Historic ...


9

I've been putting off research in Ireland, because I haven't been able to get far back enough in the USA to make the leap across the water, so this answer will be based on search results more than experience. However, for Ireland especially, due to the great amount of record loss over time, I would follow the checklist I laid out in our question How can I ...


9

Most countries have what was called a "Union List of Newspapers", published by their National Library. These are now being migrated to online catalogues and databases. As SOLLOGHODMORE is in Tipperary a search of this database on The National Library of Ireland website should help: https://www.nli.ie/en/catalogues-and-databases-printed-newspapers.aspx. For ...


8

There is no such thing as a family coat of arms (or whatever). Arms are granted to specific people and may then descend to eldest sons etc. Anyone else with that surname is not legally allowed to carry those arms. Hence your different escutcheons will have been granted to different people and have nothing to do with each other. This refers only to the ...


8

First, a note on how to read this page. This documents the baptism and "reception into the church" of multiple people, one per line. Only the first date of each month is fully spelled out, and all other dates in the month are just given by the day number of the month. The excerpt given starts with 7 August 1852. The next line is 8 August 1852, the ...


7

Great explanation from @AdrianB38! It appears to me that the script reads, "Tabulate."


7

As it is a patronymically derived name ..."Robin's son", the likelihood of there being any single attributable geographic origin is very unlikely. Surname distribution maps derived from census information will show if it is more common in specific areas. The 1881 distribution data (http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/) would certainly seem to support your ...


6

I'm wondering if the clerk might have mis-heard the name Listowel. For pronunciations see https://forvo.com/word/listowel/ Wikipedia's article on Listowel says: Listowel (/lɪsˈtoʊl/; Irish: Lios Tuathail, meaning "Tuathal's ringfort") is a Heritage town and a market town in County Kerry, Ireland, and is situated on the River Feale, 28 km (17 mi) ...


6

Per proc. (per procurationem) refers to the presence of proxy sponsors (godparents) standing in for those named. From the introduction of the Rituale Romanum (1614) and possibly earlier, the Catholic Church allowed sponsors (godparents) to be represented at a baptism by a proxy (per procurationem) if they were unable to be present but could otherwise carry ...


6

I think it is "St." from the address "Cumberland St.", which encroaches on the next box. The bar of the "t" is detached, as in "Cottages" in the groom's address, and the dot is elongated, so that it looks like "S=" overall. If you look at "St Patrick" on the top line of the full certificate, the overall form is the same, except it doesn't have a dot/line ...


6

The name is Robert Gibson. If there is a name I cannot read – which happens fairly often – then I will turn to what I can read first, and see if that helps to track it down. In this case, given this is an 1899 death certificate, the 1901 Irish census seems a good starting place. We know his address is 27 Williamstown. So Blackrock area of Dublin. By ...


5

When I get stuck, I find it helpful to step back from where I am and review what I already have, starting over again as if the problem was completely new to me, and pretending that I am a complete beginner. One problem with studying family history, especially for those of us who have learned it by gathering records online, is that the big-box data providers ...


5

The simplest method is to order a copy of the register from GRO Ireland in Roscommon. Research copies can (as of March 2016) be obtained for €4. I do not believe there is currently the facility to order research copies online, which means you have to send in the form by post or fax, although they can email you the copy. Instructions and a link to the form ...


5

I agree with Andy's assessment, that the mystery abbreviation is the "St" from Cumberland St. I know very little about the archiving process of Irish marriage records, but I would add that this appears to be a copy of a register, rather than the original. All text including signatures are in the same hand. There will be an original document containing ...


4

This will be a multi-part answer because I am still not certain exactly what the question is asking. Since the original question suggests that the research subject may have come to the USA, I'll assume for the moment that the passenger in question came here. Q: How can I find someone's arrival and entry into the USA? The first rule of genealogy is "start ...


4

As well as an online collection of Seamen's Protection Certificates, Mystic Seaport Museum's website has research guides here: Seamen's Protection Certificate Register Database (via Wayback Machine) and a database search: Registers of Seamen’s Protection Certificates. The National Maritime Digital Library might be useful to get more background information. ...


3

Even though (Conditional) is written in the Residence column, I suspect that it is the baptism which is Conditional rather than the residence because the Wikipedia entry for Conditional baptism says: Mainline Christian theology (including Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican, Lutheran and most other ...


3

I think it simply says 'British', indicating his nationality. Note that in 1851, Ireland was still part of the United Kingdom. Added in response to the comments: It certainly was not necessary for the nationality to be included, but it is not clear whether this was added by the enumerator or the householder when he filled in the household schedule. The ...


3

You're probably aware already that Pennsylvania's land records are defined and issued by the Commonwealth and not by the Federal Government. This is kind of obvious, since the Federal Government didn't exist in the time period your warrant comes from, but I want to mention it for the benefit of others who might be familiar with the later warrants issued by ...


3

This is not a direct answer to the question but hopefully contains a few useful bits of information. First, the reason why you probably cannot find Peter and his family in the 1865 or 1875 New York State censuses is because those records for Westchester County have not survived. In fact, the first state census for this county to survive is from 1905. It is ...


3

A basic strategy for 'doing family history' is to start with what you know, and then work outward in small steps, rather than trying to take large leaps. One of our community members has described this tendency to take large leaps as premature connectivitis syndrome: we don't really know enough yet by which we can well identify a person, yet we want to ...


3

Some ships were sent from Flanders to Scotland to return survivors back to Spain. A full account of the fate of survivors can be found in: The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland by Ken Douglas (Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, 2009). No names, only what happened to them.


3

The parish register is in Latin. This is far from unusual in Roman Catholic registers from rural Irish parishes. The Irish Genealogy Toolkit has a useful page on Latin in Irish Catholic parish registers. In this example, the entry for the 22nd reads: Martinus fl Jeremiah Ryan et Maria Hayes Sp Martinus Corbet et Maria L____ Drumwood Which translates to: ...


3

The name appears to be "Robert". The initial capital is odd, but mainly because of the emphasized beginning loop. That is not a dash before "Gibson", it was intended to be the cross stroke for the "t" at the end of "Robert".


3

agree - Catherine King Just to clarify it's St. Paul's RC (i.e. Arran Quay), there was also a St. Paul's CofI nearby The residence on the (civil) birth registration is different for some reason, maybe they moved between the birth and baptism (25th May - 3rd June) - appears to be 9 Usher street. The birth was at the lying in hospital, no firstname for the ...


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