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Based on Jan Murphy's comment, I researched the statutes in place as to who would sign consent under the law and I found this article on RootsWeb, citing Kentucky Ancestry: a guide to genealogical & historical research by Roseann Reinmuth Hogan, 1992, p. 82-85, that states in part: Consents Beginning in 1799, the Kentucky General Assembly amended its ...


2

If you click on the little i to the right of the 1840 census title it leads you to the wiki page about the census. Down that page is a section, United States Census, 1840 known issues which refers to an article which says : Some records are missing. It then lists some options for you to try to access the information, Most missing records are ...


2

It appears spelling as Susanna Remey is very likely correct. I located a Susanna Grigsby married to a Jacob King Remey (then deceased) and living in Bardstown, Nelson, Kentucky during the time of the signature in 1814.


2

People with trees on Ancestry.com seem to think his parents were Samuel E. Chambers and Mary Melvana “Sis” Boyd. Don't know about the father, but I agree with the mother. George is shown in the 1910 Census being raised by his mother and grandparents. In the 1920 Census at age 16, he had not attended school the past year, and was working as a farm hand for ...


2

Many NARA microfilm publications have a descriptive pamphlet which describes the microfilm and explains how it is arranged. These publications sometimes say when pages have been lost (similar to the Known Issues articles at FamilySearch. I have not been able to find such a description of the records from NARA yet, but I will link to it if I can find one. (...


1

The order of people in documents vary by document. For example, in the US Census (and most if not all state censuses), the order is generally: male head of household, wife of head of household, children of head of household from oldest to youngest (but not by gender), stepchildren, other relatives (grouped together in the same order), other residents of the ...


1

I looked all though the Records for Kentucky in the 1840 Census. Five John Knights, but none of them from that county. So, I think it may be a lost record as well. Unless someone got the county wrong somewhere.


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