10

The determination of relationship terms -- what is X called -- is a task best suited to linguists and anthropologists, who ask informants to describe what is happening in their own culture. Software exists to help in collecting these terms, and matching them against known libraries of kinship terms in other cultures -- one such tool is SIL's SILKin. It ...


8

There is no common word (though see below) for this relationship in English, but there is one in Spanish: concuñado/a. So William is your concuñado. This word is used a lot at some of our family gatherings. Note that cuñado/a is Spanish for brother/sister-in-law. However the terms co-brother-in-law and co-sister-in-law are sometimes used for this in ...


8

As can be seen from many earlier Q&As here, the Relationship Calculator of Stephen P. Morse, is an easy to use tool for this purpose and has either been applied to, or could be applied to, these questions: What would a step-grandmother's(?) brother be called? Step-father of Step-father What is sibling of son-in-law or daughter-in-law called? ...


8

It is Dependent. Formal adoption in law did not exist in Britain until 1926. The change in law being brought about after the large number of orphans created by the First World War and the Influenza epidemic shortly after. Before this time, adoption was an informal process performed in various ways. My understanding is that the Church was usually involved....


7

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) one meaning of cousin is: A collateral relative more distant than a brother or sister; a kinsman or kinswoman, a relative; formerly very frequently applied to a nephew or niece. Obsolete. The last quotation applicable to this meaning is dated 1747 (S. Richardson Clarissa I. vi. 36). (I only just noticed that'...


6

I think that: child 1's relation to: 2 is 1st cousin 3 is 3/4 sibling child 2's relation to: 1 is 1st cousin 3 is 3/4 sibling child 3's relation to: 2 and 3 is 3/4 sibling According to Wikipedia: Three-quarter siblings have one common parent, while their unshared parents have a mean consanguinity of 50%. This means the unshared parents are ...


5

First of all, you are welcome to have whatever kind of a relationship with whomever you wish, and death of the connecting person won't influence that. As for what the names would be, the relationship would remain the same if via death. Via divorce, typically you would not use such names. If you are re-married, well, feel free to call the family of your ...


5

With respect to Dohnanyi, Dietrich Bonhoeffer could be referred to as: His son's wife's brother (for most detail), His son's brother-in-law, or His daughter-in-law's brother. Relatives through marriage are generally known as "affines" or "in-laws", and only the close relationships have a specific term. This is only for English. There may be one or more ...


5

The apparently simple expression related to actually hides an extra-ordinary amount of complexity. It might refer to any or all of the following a blood relationship (now better described as a genetic relationship) a legal relationship a cultural or customary relationship In particular communities, each of these could impose familial obligations or ...


5

The answer to the question Has the usage of the term [kinship term] changed over time? is very likely to be "yes" if enough time has passed. For the particular question about "uncle" see "When is an Uncle Not an Uncle?" Slippery Terms of Relationship and Status in Genealogical Records posted by Dale H. Cook on The Plymouth Colony Pages. For other terms ...


4

The site you are referring to may well be Steve Morse's Relationship Calculator which has been used recently to answer two questions here: Determining name for family relationship that involves a step daughter? What would a step-grandmother's(?) brother be called?


4

Well there isn't a special name for this - he is just your brother-in-law's brother.


4

Aside from the generic "kin", the overly specific "first cousins through their fathers, second cousins through their mothers" and their consanguinity (15.625%) being slightly higher than for otherwise unrelated first cousins (12.5%), not really; at least not in English. For that matter, not in any other language I know, but there easily might be one which ...


4

Let's assume John Adams is your only common relative, found somewhere perhaps around 9 generations back. That would make you and your husband 8th cousins. If there have been a different number of generations between your husband's side of the family and yours, then he's your 8th cousin, removed by whatever the difference is in the number of generations. ...


4

I haven't seen such terminology. But I needed something similar, mainly to define DNA relationships, so I developed a notation I call: Behold's Genetic Relationship Notation (BGRN). You can develop relationships in words from the notation, e.g.: Y- = Male person’s spouse Y-(YX)xaY = Male person’s spouse’s sister’s adopted child’s father. XXXX–x-X- = ...


4

A godson does not have to be any relation at all to his godparents, and often is not. I would think a godson is unlikely to also be a son-in-law, given godparents are named at the time of baptism (usually in infancy), and it would be a bit coincidental for the father of his future wife to be present. Given the information given here, my guess would be that ...


3

This question has at least four different aspects to it. Linguistic. Someone who is divorced usually refers to his wife as an ex-wife. Widowers refer to their wives as a late wife. Legal. If you have concerns about how your legal relationship with your late wife's parents has changed because of your wife's death, please ask someone who is licensed to ...


3

No, you would not - the term "cousin-in-law" is often used to refer to either your cousin's spouse, or your spouse's cousin(s) (although the more correct term would be "cousin by marriage"). Neither legal nor anthropological/sociological affinity recognizes relationships more distant than that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-law_%...


3

Since there is no blood/genetic relation between such siblings of half-siblings, there may not be an official term. Unofficially people sometimes refer to them as cross siblings which I believe is a play on cross cousins, which is an official genetic term.


3

Bear with me through the obvious stuff. Family relationships fall in to 3 categories: related by blood (mother, father, siblings, grandparents, etc.) related by marriage (spouse, step-parent, etc.) related by adoption, which can be formal or informal. Normally used only for nuclear family relationships, but I include other voluntary connections or ...


3

Could you have been thinking of Kinship Calculator by Mark Tucker? It is a simple online interactive diagram that allows you to determine the relationships of two people knowing the relationship of each to a common ancestor. However it does not have spousal relationships (e.g. cousin-in-law).


3

If both relatives have profiles on WikiTree, there is a "Relationship Finder" tool that will tell you the (blood) relationship between them: http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Special:Relationship


3

I just fed your information into the Steve Morse's Relationship Calculator in this order: parent sister husband daughter daughter and it returned that your parent's sister's husband's daughter's daughter is to you a ??? (non-blood relative) If you ignore the "husband" that led to the step then you get (as @TomH said) 1st cousin once removed (...


3

My understanding is that if there are two ways for one person to be related to another, then that is called a double relationship. To determine what each of the two individual relationships may be called we have a Q&A here that can be used: Seeking English term for relationship between two members of extended family? The other Q&A here that I think ...


3

I believe you'd be 6th cousins, 7 times removed to Martha Wayles.


2

Well ignoring the "step" aspect you would be first cousins once removed. See How to determine relationship with a cousin? for details of how to calculate cousin relationships.


2

The following example should make this clear to you. Imagine that a married couple is (according to the law) a single person. So, according to the law. You and your wife are the same. So, her sister is for you a sister-in-law. And you are for her a brother-in-law.


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