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9

Adrian is correct -- as he suggested in the earlier answer, we can find some clues in Marian L. Smith's Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations. Let's look at the two lines you are most interested in: line 21, column 8: 12x – 3100 – (505) 3/25/37 line 22, column 8: 12x – 2810 – (505) 9/29/36 In the Glossary of Acronyms and ...


8

the names on the Berlin manifest have a pencil line drawn through them Names on the manifest were lined out when the passengers did not sail. See Marian L. Smith's article A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations at JewishGen.org. The information you want is on the page Markings on the Manifest's Left Margin, under the section "Not Shipped,&...


8

There are multiple approaches to this problem -- here are my recommendations for how to go about the search. Important note: Do not assume there is only one passenger list -- many families had family members who went back and forth multiple times before settling in the USA. Find your great-grandfather's arrival (and find his naturalization records, if any ...


7

You omitted links to the passenger list: at ellisisland.org, the entry is indexed "Andres Glavac" at ancestry.com, the entry is indexed "Andres Giavac" (3 times!) Column 11 (departure contact) sister: Glavac Ana Cze[rc?]socz Hung. Column 18 (destination contact) br.i.l. [S?]obocan Martin 19[9?]. 201 Erie St. So Chicago Ill. The placename in column 11 is ...


5

I rather suspect that those dates are in the 1900s and could relate to naturalisation of the passengers. Have a look at A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations


5

This is a very common and frustratingly undocumented annotation on Ellis Island passenger manifests but after a thorough review, I believe I have determined the meaning. My belief is that the 'S' stands for sojourn as in a 'protracted sojourn' as opposed to 'in transit' or 'transient'. In addition to wanting to document whether a person/family had a ticket ...


5

Jan Murphy's answer focused on resources. Mine is more about questions that may spark research paths. They may not all be answerable: Return to Europe, first "sent away by train" - How far did they go on the train and to which port? Could they have gone all the way to the east coast before embarking to Europe? How much would the voyage have cost? Was she ...


5

I am by no means an expert, but I would say it is Cambria St . First, off there are the wrong number of strokes for it to be Caroline. There is the obvious C and a, then the r and o. So far so good, but after the l, there is the i, n, an extra stroke and an e. (Assuming for the sake of illustration it says Caroline). That extra stroke doesn't make sense in ...


5

The name appears to be written as "Dovgirdeli" or "Dowgirdeli". However, this will have been an attempt to render a Russian/Polish/Lithuanian name into English so we shouldn't expect that the spelling will necessarily exactly match the original place-name! I found this List of inhabited places of Suwalki governorate which includes the following place ...


4

The only passenger lists currently on-line for people leaving the U.S. are those for entry in the UK (as discussed in TomH's answer) and entry to Canada (not all crossing points). There may be archived copies in the various countries with international ports, but I have more than 15 such ports referenced in my database for relatives leaving Austria-Hungary. ...


4

As @ColeValleyGirl says, this is rather a broad question and it would be easier to give a more specific answer with more knowledge of what country they might have been going to. As far as I know there are no passenger lists for passengers leaving the US which means you will need to look for records of people arriving in Europe. Passengers arriving in the ...


4

In many respects, your question is like one already posted here, How can I determine what records are available in a particular locale? The same principles apply for discovering records for a particular time or topic. My checklist for finding new record groups looks like this: Learn what records might have been created in a particular time and place. ...


4

This will be a multi-part answer because I am still not certain exactly what the question is asking. Since the original question suggests that the research subject may have come to the USA, I'll assume for the moment that the passenger in question came here. Q: How can I find someone's arrival and entry into the USA? The first rule of genealogy is "start ...


4

The first letter looks like a 'C' and is not very different from the C in Chicago on line 7 or in Cleveland on line 11 (both in column of final destination). The second letter puzzled me first but then, although I don't speak polish, I recalled that the combination 'CZ' is not uncommon in polish, so I go for 'z'. Third and fourth letters looks like 'eu' or '...


4

Passenger lists were not required for travel within the UK, or even between the UK and Europe. See TNA Passenger Lists Guide. The one exception to that is when "a ship called at more than one European port before travelling further afield." And vice versa for inbound traffic. So far as I know all passenger traffic between Ireland and mainland Britain was ...


4

This appears to be answered by the Code of Federal Regulations: 1949-1984. Chapter 1 deals with Immigration and Naturalization. The phrase used there on several occasions is 'a valid passport or other travel document'. This therefore covers documents including non-US passports, US visas issued without a passport, NATO Travel Orders, etc. In short, it ...


3

In cases like this, I often search for the ship itself and mine those websites and newspaper accounts for clues about where records might be found. Newspapers of the day may not have accurate information in the early accounts, but they can be helpful in establishing a timeline of events. The website The Red Duster has an entry for the SS Galway Castle in its ...


3

One potentially very good source of information is the WWI and WWII Alien Registration files. In particular, the later is still mostly in existence, and contains the ship by which the person immigrated. These can be requested from the National Archives. They have a great FAQ to ask how to find the record.


3

Try using Stephen P. Morse's One-Step Webpages at http://stevemorse.org/ and search as many different ways as you can think of. Note that Morse has a form to search the Russians to America Passenger Data File, 1834 - 1897, part of NARA's Access to Archival Databases (AAD). Always search the same site as many different ways as you can access it, since there'...


3

I think the quickest route to verifying this family legend will be to determine the ship your great grandfather travelled on to the United States. My understanding (as a non-American) is that this is a detail likely to be recorded on a Naturalization record. Once you have the ship's name, locating a passenger list for any voyage it may have made in the ...


3

According to Wikipedia, SS Neckar was operated by Norddeutscher Lloyd (NDL). An arrival from 1882 means that the ship was the first S/S Neckar, not the later one launched in 1901. Wikipedia describes it like this: SS Neckar (1874), in service 1874–1896; scrapped at Genoa, 1896 Norway Heritage gives a build date of 1873 for the Neckar. In their 1882 ...


3

Cisna, Poland looks to be not far from Ukrainian & Hungarian boarders today but it has not always been that way. I looked for multiple other variations of Cisna / Cesna and Cieszyn and couldn't find any other references except for ones that brought me back to this area of what is today Poland. I found this 1909 map of Russia that shows Cisna where ...


3

When trying to decipher handwriting like this it is useful to have a larger sample to work with. This enables looking at other entries and confirming how individual letter are written. It can also help to invert the image. I am not so certain that it is in fact Cambria as suggested by others looking at the inverted image. As above I would like to see a ...


3

The passenger list for the final voyage of the SS Galway Castle is available at Ancestry courtesy of the National Archives (UK). The twist is that the passenger list is under a different ship's name, the "Rhodesia." However, the following items on the passenger list all correspond to those of the Galway Castle on her final voyage: Official Number (...


3

The Queensland State Archives Brief guide 16 provides some explanations on Immigration Agent records. Free and assisted passages were granted by the Government to categories of immigrants and their families, which were from time to time required in Queensland. These categories included at various time farmers, farm labourers, vine dressers, labourers, ...


3

The answer to your question is hidden in one of your examples. Example 1 The post "Katie Scahill - SS Carmania - Record Of Detained Alien - Port Of New York" contains a link to an article from the January/February 2003 Ancestry magazine which was previously hosted on Ancestry. This article can be accessed via the Wayback Machine and on Google Books. In "...


2

Some information I have helps add weight to your translation and that of @CanadianGirlScout: Luka Cacic and Karlo Cacic, lived outside Kansas City, MO in Sugar Creek. My Grandmother Manda Suknaic came to USA in 1913 and to Sugar Creek, MO to live with a brother-in-law. According to my Grandmother's birth certificate Her mother Mara Cacic and Father ...


2

You don't mention where they lived or visited on either side of the journey you know about, so I can't make more specific suggestions about what to try. However, in my own research, I have found clues and references to international travel in City directories, social news columns in newspapers (I've had the most luck on Genealogy Bank, but the success rate ...


2

The links in the original question are not valid any longer, but I will post a general answer to help others with similar problems. It is treacherous to link to individual records or images without also citing what database was examined -- re-arrangement of websites or re-publication of databases can obscure what record set was meant. Each collection on ...


2

Never underestimate the power of error. I find my grandfather in Castle Garden's data, entering on the SS Weimar, 22 April 1891. The problem is that he entered Baltimore on that day, not New York City, as confirmed by three research librarians at NARA's NYC branch. They even called Filby to speak to him about it. The last I looked, though, my GF, and all his ...


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