9

Professor Rebecca Probert ("a leading authority on the history of marriage law and practice in England and Wales" to quote the blurb on her book) has written a useful book: Divorced, Bigamist, bereaved? the family historians guide. She writes: "... a void marriage needed no decree of annulment..." "Bigamy is, essentially, the crime of going through a ...


9

One thing to research is their later church affiliation. One possibility is that between 1925 and 1928 they changed their religious conviction. The Roman Catholic church, at the time, may not have recognised their first marriage in a Presbyterian church and on conversion to Catholicism they had to re-marry in the RC church so that the marriage was recognised....


7

According to Rebecca Probert in Marriage Law for Genealogists the definitive guide Key fact: before 25th March, 1754, neither the Church nor the secular courts regarded as valid any marriage that had not been celebrated before an ordained Anglican clergyman. If your ancestors were not Anglican (e.g. Catholic or non-conformist) they may have wished to ...


6

I am speaking from my experience of Scottish records but I have no reason to suspect that the practice was greatly different in England. In Scotland, couples were frequently rebuked for ante-nuptial fornication when children arrived rather too soon after marriage. This would be recorded in the kirk session minutes of the parish (kirk session = minister and ...


6

They would have to pay the bond if they broke the terms of that bond. A bond, whether that be a probate bond, bastardy bond, marriage bond, etc., is simply a legal instrument by which people swear to forfeit a certain sum if they do not carry out or comply with the terms of that bond. Marriage bonds in the 1700s typically swore the groom and another one or ...


6

It is a wedding souvenir and it is in German Alois Kowatsch Josefa Kowatsch geb Gregortschitsch Vermählt 10. Januar 1898 zu Oestereich. that is: [groom] Alois Kowatsch [bride] Josefa Kowatsch, maiden name Gregortschitsch married 10. January 1898 in Austria The resources mentioned in Reading given name of German great-grandaunt? would have helped you ...


5

Where have you searched so far, and how did you attempt to search? You've talked to some relatives (cousins?) but you haven't said if you or they are working exclusively online, or whether any of you have access to local resources. Have you checked for clues in your own family records? Is there a family Bible? Sources of Genealogical Information is a ...


4

On marriages in Britain, The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History notes several key points that dictated the age at which individuals married: [T]he great majority of the people of Britain remained unmarried until their mid-twenties. The proportion of males and females who married before the age of 20 was always low....The restrictions of ...


4

A state's age of consent for marriage (without parents' permission) today is not necessarily the same as the age of consent for marriage (without parents' permission) a century ago. My husband's grandmother and grandfather were married in New York City in the 1940's when he was "just" 20, not yet 21, and so he had to bring his father with him to prove he had ...


4

On paper you can use the traditional relationship indicators, also known as a genogram. Here is range of genogram symbols from Wikipedia. If you are using a family tree software, you would still enter the pair as a couple for the software's sake. You should then be able to edit the 'marriage' details to be more specific to each person's case. Eg Divorced/ ...


4

Population Studies from Parish Registers, a selection of readings from Local Population Studies, edited by Michael Drake (Local Population Studies, 1982, ISBN 0 9503951 7 X) contains a number of papers concerning this problem. Bessie Maltby found that in Easingwold (NRY) in the period from 1644-1812 3% of partners were from a parish over 20 miles away. In ...


4

As we figured it out in the comments, the second entry is a proclamation record (see the abbreviation procl. in the record), the first one an actual marriage record (identified by the word/abbreviation copul./copuliret). The correct dates would then be May 12 1689 for proclamation and May 28 1689 for marriage.


4

This is an extract from a response from the WDYTYA forum from a chap who is a registrar: "The question the registrar would ask is essentially "have you ever been married before" and to be shown as a bachelor he must have answered "no". You can't really prove a negative, so there is no evidence he could be asked to produce to support ...


3

My answer quoted is essentially correct - but you would need to check what guidance was given to registrars (assuming it was a civil marriage), or clergy (for a church Marriage) on whether such evidence had to be physically checked at that time (it would be now). You might find such instructions in the Registrar General files at the National Archives (RG ...


3

In the comments on the post Have you searched and searched for the marriage without finding it? by Arlene on Arlene Eakle's Genealogy Blog, a comment posted on February 14, 2012 at 6:05 pm by annamadori says: I helped process and index many of the marriage records for Fredericksburg, Virginia. We were amazed at the time that the number of marriages ...


3

Do away with the perception that our ancestors didn't travel far. Especially by the nineteenth century there were several forms of transportation. Horse and carriage would of course be most common, but with the advent of the railways and expansion of roads, transportation over longer distances became easier and more accessible. People also walked long ...


3

It may help to keep an open mind on this question, since the records in Scotland are not going to be as tidy and regular at this period as they might have been in a later period, especially when compared to post-civil-registration church records from south of the Border. The section Proclamation and Banns from the article OPR Banns & Marriages at ...


2

It may be worth mentioning that whether a widow remarrying is indexed under both her maiden name and her current (pre 2nd marriage) name depends on the custom and practice of the people compiling the index. It may well be the case that the standard GRO index for England and Wales indexes only once (I've never checked!) but I know that my 4G-GM is indexed ...


2

I presume when you say "2 records of marriage" you mean two entries in a marriage index; there is almost certainly only one record, and purchasing it (which can be done directly through the GRO; going through third parties only adds to the cost) would tell you exactly what the situation was. The way that bmd records, including consular registrations, were ...


2

My go-to source for that time period in Massachusetts is Samuel Freeman's manual for town clerks, which goes by the absurdly long title, The Town Officer: Or, The Power and Duty of Selectmen, Town Clerks, Town Treasurers, Overseers of the Poor, Assessors, Constables, Collectors of taxes, Surveyors of Highways, Surveyors of Lumber, Fence Viewers, Field ...


1

You may want to try to reach out to the Genealogical Research team at the Franklin County Historical & Museum Society in Malone, NY. Email: fcohms@northnet.org Website: www.franklinhistory.org


1

Since the other answers were posted, the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society has published a massive research guide: New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer I agree with the suggestion to ask about indexes and guides to special collections in libraries and archives -- in any library or archive, but especially in local ones. ...


1

Banns are usually read 3 times and the marriage usually takes place shortly after the 3rd reading (traditionally the following Saturday). Banns are read in both the bride and grooms parish (if they are not the same) and also in the parish in which they are to be married if different. So the wedding may have been Saturday 4th April or on any day up to 3 ...


1

Call and ask Rensselaer County County Clerk: 9am – 5pm, Phone: (518) 270-4080, Fax: (518) 271-7998, Location: 105 Third Street, Troy, NY 12180 or Rensselaer Public Library (518) 462-1193 http://rensselaerlibrary.org/


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