16

Two common reasons for lying about age at marriage were: Pretending to be over 21 (and so not needing parental consent) Adjusting your age to be closer to your partners. Possibly you have examples of both.


15

It says "Leeds in the County of York"


12

It's "Superintendent Registrar's Certificate" - though I admit it does help to know the various ways of getting married rather than rely on the text. Generally marriages in the Church of England would take place after banns had been read in the parish churches of the two parties. There are various reasons for not getting banns - pre-1837 the couple could get ...


12

I think (having looked at the full page on FindMyPast) that it probably actually says "were" so that it reads: John Smith Captains Clarke of his Majestys Ship Firm and Sarah Osment of St Andrews Plymouth a minor with consent of parents were married in this church by licence this thirteenth Day of July in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty ...


11

With a marriage that took place before Loving vs. Virginia I see three possibilities: Your parents didn't disclose your mother's heritage (i.e. she could 'pass'). Your parents married somewhere else (not likely to be South Carolina or Georgia). Your parents married after 1967 (or never married). Since you have a marriage date, let's assume for the moment ...


10

I was intrigued by your problem and the answer given, which is correct. I took a few minutes (<10) to look up the record. The FamilySearch entry came from film# 1469720, which is Archbishop of York's marriage bonds and allegations. There are actually 4 documents - the bond, the allegation, the license, and a supporting baptismal certificate for the bride. ...


10

Counkilla or Ceancullig (Gaelic: Ceann Coille) is located just north of Drimoleague. It is a townland in Drimoleague parish. Clearly there are numerous spelling variations of this place that you may find, some more phonetic, some more true to its Gaelic origin. See the entry for Ceancullig on Townlands.ie for more information about this location. Historic ...


9

Interestingly, James and Annie's headstone seems to hold some key information about Annie's ancestry and therefore her marriage. It can be found on FindAGrave: As you can see, the Wards were buried with the Parry family. There must be some relationship or association between the two families. The marriage identified by Tom which shows Annie's maiden name as ...


8

I caution against trying to over-interpret the term in the light of modern usage. It may signify nothing more than the fact that she has been married previously. She is Mistress M(?)eisstin because she is no longer Miss McPherson but nor is she still Mrs Meisstin. One might have expected the same courtesy to be offered to the divorcee on the facing page, ...


8

The words after John Larke's name are "Single Man" it's just the top of the a doesn't go all the way over. Compare to "Single Woman" after Elizabeth's name. I would interpret it as meaning he was a bachelor rather than a widower. The "No 2" is I suspect just the number of that entry, but you would need to compare it to the records before and after to be ...


8

The critical part of the information is the GS Film number:1562175. If you go to the Family Search Catalog, paste this number into the search box labeled film/fiche number. You will see the following results: Manhattan (New York City) marriage records, 1866-1937 ; index to all boroughs, 1866-1937 Author: New York. Department of Health. Division ...


8

Some small differences, especially in word endings: Inter Josephum Wojnowski viduus de Bialybrod operanium et Hedwigem Wojleckem de huba Lukowo non uxor atam ad contrahendum matrimonium sacramentale benedictio Ecclesiae facta. Translated, again small differences: Between Joseph Wojnowski, widower of Bialybrod, laborer, and Jadwiga (or Hedwig) ...


8

I assume that the children you have found in the birth indexes are these ones: Eveline Edith WARD 1903 Q4 Chester 8a 380 Rose Gertrude WARD 1905 Q4 Chester 8a 364 James Spencer WARD 1907 Q2 Chester 8a 415 Thomas Edward WARD 1909 Q2 Chester 8a 376 Starting from that we can use the new GRO index to get the maiden name of the mother, which is ...


8

The rules had been set out in Hardwicke's Marriage Act 1753. The Act required that, for a marriage to be valid, it had to be performed in a church and either after the publication of banns or the obtaining of a licence. If the marriage was by licence, those under the age of 21 had to prove parental consent before the licence was issued. If the marriage was ...


8

The language of the text is Hungarian. Mainly using an online translator and dictionary and the word list linked by @ColeValleyGirl, I came up with the following: Hazasultak: marriage A jegyesek: the bridal pair (i.e. bride and groom) Sorszám: (registration) number Esküvési év, hónap és nap: wedding year, month and day vezeték- és keresztneve: family name ...


8

Based on this reference work originally referred to by @ColeValleyGirl in her comments to my question it states: A batman or an orderly is a soldier or airman assigned to a commissioned officer as a personal servant. Before the advent of motorized transport, an officer's batman was also in charge of the officer's "bat-horse" that carried the pack saddle ...


7

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (https://genealogy.org.il) is in the process of indexing marriage and divorce records from the British Mandate period. You can search their database and see all the information for free, but it requires one to register on their site first. Viewing the actual marriage certificate requires membership in the ...


7

A baptismal witness may have emigrated from the same region as your ancestor. I was unable to locate the point of origin for my German ancestor, but the baptismal witness for one of his children traveled on the same ship and his origin was known. This helped me connect to previously unknown ancestors in Germany.


7

First, have your looked in Nørresundby Kirkebøger (churchbooks) for their marriage (Viede)? Was your father a first child? Or were there older children? That has a bearing on your timeline. (Consider looking for a marriage date up to and including 1884.) Looking in Nørresundby would be the obvious first step. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to get into ...


7

I believe that this refers to the Intention. At that time, the couple wishing to be married would file an intention to be married. This would be published in the home town of both sets of parents and in the town the couple lived in. If there was no objection from the community after a given period, they could then get married. Engaged couples are required ...


7

I suggest you obtain a copy of Winifred's birth certificate. It can be ordered from the GRO website. In the New GRO index, here is her entry: As you can see, the Mother's maiden surname is given as a dash, indicating she was very likely illegitimate. The most likely explanation is that Winifred's mother was unmarried when Winifred was born. Whether Edward ...


7

There are three possibilities here, all of which you need to assess. The two marriages (of Edward Goode to Sarah Ann Nutt in 1894, and of George Edward Goode to Norah O'Brien in 1901) are not marriages of the same man. There are points of similarity -- the father's name and occupation; the ages suggesting the same year of birth; the addresses are very ...


7

According to Rebecca Probert in Marriage Law for Genealogists the definitive guide Key fact: before 25th March, 1754, neither the Church nor the secular courts regarded as valid any marriage that had not been celebrated before an ordained Anglican clergyman. If your ancestors were not Anglican (e.g. Catholic or non-conformist) they may have wished to ...


7

I read Andrievci, Kreis Brod in Slawonien heimatszuständig nach Klattau gl. Bez. in Böhmen The answer to your question lies in "heimatzuständig" or also only "zuständig" (responsible) in other records. The "Heimatrecht" (local citizenship) in a community was acquired either by being born there, marrying in or in later days also by living there for a ...


6

A useful guiding principle is that you should record everything that might be useful to you later (even if you are not sure at the moment how you will use it). You may have heard of the approach called FAN Club genealogy that emphasises research on Friends, Associates and Neighbours of your target family as a way around apparent blockages. Witnesses ...


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