9

The handwriting isn't great (and it hasn't come through well on the pdf copy), but the Address is given as "Independence MO". The downstroke of the J of "Jr" crosses the last "e" of "Independence". I've taken he liberty of removing the name and indicating each letter in red above the script here:


5

Those numbers appear to have nothing to do with the obituary information. If you look at the rest of the full page you linked to, you'll see (2) and (c2) and (c8) and (c14) and other such codes in the same location after many of the want ads that are to the right of the obituaries you show in the image. It must be some sort of code used by the newspaper, ...


5

RFD = Rural Free Delivery, referring to those people on the rural mail routes. The numeral will refer to the route. The abbreviation is noted in the introductory information of a 1914 Missouri directory. Wikipedia also provides a good overview of Rural Free Delivery. Rural Free Delivery (RFD) is a service which began in the United States in the late ...


5

One possible line of inquiry (the one I would do next) is to investigate the properties themselves. What kind of properties were in that section of Main Street at that time? Can you find property records for the period that say who owned the properties? Did any of the properties sell? Look for information in any record you can think of -- newspapers, ...


4

Cemetery listings There are 2 Mount Washington Cemeteries in Missouri - one in Independence, Jackson County and a smaller one in Plattsburg, Clinton County. Most likely the Mount Washington in Independence was meant, since a city was not specified. Anna Foster also not found in billiongraves.com & interment.net. Goodman and Boller Funeral Home I ...


4

The 1880 census was the first US census to include a place on the form for what we call a street address. On the censuses prior to that, individual dwellings were organized geographically in districts but not usually given unique identifiers. Therefore, it will not be possible to search the 1860 census by address. You can search most census databases by the ...


4

The car seems most likely to be an early-1940s model Chevy or Plymouth Coupe. The third picture is not the same car; it's a 1920s sedan style. The man's shoes are two-tone style that might be a Spectator shoe which apparently had a long fashion run so may not be too helpful.


4

I have tried to remove as much of the paper color as possible, as a means of highlighting what was written: My best interpretation is "J. H. Gold":


3

As already stated, the types of information asked for in the Census changed over the years, and so did the arrangement of the Census itself. The 1880 Census introduced the numbering of the Enumeration Districts -- this change in arrangement may be why Morse's Unified ED finder only starts with the 1880 Census. In her article "Plans of Division": Describing ...


2

I found one directory for 1906 where the listing of companies in the rear listed the same address for which the abbreviation confy was used under Confectionary. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. See pages 934 and 938 of the images of the directory for Confectionary ...


2

Here's the only photographer I found with initials J. H. Name: James H Schwartz Residence Year: 1887 Street address: ws Broad Residence Place: Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, USA Occupation: Photographer Publication Title: Kansas City, Missouri, City Directory, 1887


2

Such information is unlikely to be publicly accessible, for privacy reasons. Vital records are generally not public records. Missouri state regulations (19 CSR 10-10.090) dictate that only certain people may have access to birth certificates, and the information contained therein: As authorized by section 193.255.1, RSMo 1986, the registrant, a member ...


1

Based on your Ancestry tree, I'm thinking this 1900 St. Louis, MO census record is at least a possibility (Belle Brewer and children William & Pansey): https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DBG3-8MR?wc=9BQ5-J4G%3A1030552401%2C1034846101%2C1035572301%3Fcc%3D1325221&cc=1325221 The names, ages, and locations are the same or similar, and maybe ...


1

Without the context of the surrounding community -- knowing the friends, neighbors, and associates -- we can miss important clues. We can start by narrowing the time frame for when Samuel McReynolds came to Oregon, and then working backwards from there. A search in the FamilySearch catalog for Umatilla County, Oregon shows: Agricultural and property ...


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