8

Mitochondrial DNA mutates very slowly. Like on the order of one mutation in a thousand or so years. FamilyTreeDNA have published a guide on Understanding Your mtDNA Full Sequence Results. For the Full Sequence mtDNA test you have done, with a match genetic distance of 0 (i.e. a perfect match) you can be 95% confident that the common maternal ancestor ...


7

The short answer is being you have completed a very basic Y test and you should have met ftDNA's internal requirements of first doing a Y-## test before being able to order a BigY test and even if your kit does not show it, call them and they will add it to your cart or send you a special checkout URL.If they insist on adding a Y test you can request they ...


6

No. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down unchanged (except in very very rare circumstances) from a woman to all her children. If you have had your own mtDNA done, there is no need to perform the same test for your mother (or your siblings for that matter). You will all share the same results. ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy ) explains ...


5

I found in the Family Tree DNA Learning Centre, an article on the mtDNA Matches Page, and they have in their Q&A there this question and answer: When I try this procedure, it loads my HVR1 and HVR2 results into Mitosearch for me. Answer for Problem 1: It uses the rCRS values Answer for Problem 2: For the mutations that are not one of A, C, G or T, it ...


5

You inherit exactly half your DNA from each parent. So, no, you are not more related to one parent or the other. However, it is unlikely for you to inherit exactly a quarter of each of your grandparents' DNA. Often, you inherit 20% to 30% from each grandparent, totaling 100%. This is because you inherit a random 50% of each parent's DNA, so you may get a ...


5

Your maternal aunt has the same mother with your mother. The mtDNA is inherited through direct maternal line and also is very rarely mutated It means that there is great probability that you have the same mtDNA with your maternal aunt. Please don't be confused in questions of differences between mtDNA and atDNA. mtDNA is the DNA located in specific ...


4

The difference between a DNA test for genealogy and a WGS (Whole Genome Sequencing) test is that the test for genealogy obtains values for about 700,000 SNPs (Single Nuleotide Polymorphisms), whereas the WGS obtains the values for all 3 billion positions in your genome. For genealogy purposes, the 700,000 are enough, because they are picked from among the 10 ...


4

For the record and for those interested, I want to give a little more detail than is in Leah's answer. Leah's answer is a very good overview and has the important points that a beginning genetic genealogist needs to know. The real world, as always, is a little more complicated. Our DNA is organized in three kinds: autosomal chromosomes (numbered 1-22) ...


4

You will have the same mtDNA as your maternal aunt - as mtDNA is remains largely unchanged for thousands of years in your direct maternal line. Did you you get information on the Haplogroup? You can read more about these tests here: https://www.smarterhobby.com/genealogy/best-dna-test/


4

I had some comments on this on the ISOGG Facebook group. Ann Turner, James Lick and Rebekah Canada set me straight: My uncle has 4 mutations from mt haplogroup H3w and no matches that share one or more of those mutations without being different on others to give a Genetic Distance of 3 or less, which is what Family Tree DNA will display. Whereas, I have 2 ...


4

The ISOGG Wiki has a table mapping clan names to haplogroups. Of the 36 clans in your diagram, all but 4 of them are listed: Hera, Irena, Rhea and Wanda. The table also gives associations for 6 names that are not among the clans in your diagram: Iris, Lila, Latifa, Rohani, Ulaana and Wilma. Your V15a group would be Velda.


4

No sequencing technology is perfect. For the full sequence mtDNA test, FamilyTreeDNA uses a Next Generation Sequencing technology called Illumina. I will vastly oversimplify here, but this method determines the sequence by extending fragments of your DNA sample, applying fluorescent tags, and detecting the wavelength of light produced as each nucleotide is ...


4

The thing to realize is that DNA science is new and quickly evolving as more people test and the science gets better and more granular. As such it was identified a couple years ago that Haplogroups need to be fairly often revised as new discoveries are made. The last major update was in 2014, and K2B2 used to generically just be K-M526. Although K-M526 ...


4

The only real reason for doing an mtDNA test for genealogical purposes is to prove that one person's female line connects with another person's female line. However, mtDNA is passed down almost identically from generation to generation with individual mutations happening rarely. So you will be unable to tell how far back the two lines connect. If you know ...


3

Yes, you've got the right idea. mtDNA is passed identically from generation to generation with only an occasional mutation every so often. In your case, going up 1000 years and down again 1000 years, you and the other people have only 3 differences. What that means is that mtDNA is basically useless for genealogical purposes. The only real use is to ...


2

I want to add to @lkessler answer, that the best choice is to make Autosomal testing for eldest relatives, because the size of matched DNA segments fades with decreasing of relationship degree very fast. So we can surely determine first or second cousins and more distant relatives are lost in the mess of speculative matches. It the reason why the Autosomal ...


2

You won't find scientific DNA in any of the databases of the popular DNA companies where you can compare your DNA to others. If GEDmatch has any such data, it will be marked research only and you won't be able to find it or compare to it. With regards to mtDNA, Family Tree DNA is the only company that now offers mtDNA testing that gives you more than just ...


2

Each genealogical testing company selects a proprietary portion of the approximately 700,000 SNPs to include in their test and this changes over time with different versions of their test as they evolve: 23andMe v3 11/2010 to 11/2013 v4 11/2013 to 08/2017 v5 08/2017 to at least 01/2020 according to their API since 11/2007 Ancestry v1 01/2012 to 05/2016 ...


1

I have sent your qestion to the 23andMe helpdesk and they said that they don't offer this service. It is not possible to import genetic data from other services into a 23andMe account. Therefore you will need to purchase a kit directly from our website. They do go on to say that We understand that other services support this functionality Of course ...


1

I bought the book and was a little dissapointed. I think there were like 20 individuals sampled. None belonged to A, C, or D. Several had markers of haplogroup B and couldn't be ruled out. Some had one marker for haplogroup X but not enough classify it confidently as Haplogroup X. There were 5 that the study described as having non native american ...


1

His mother might have had a heteroplasmy mutation. (That's why I'll never have any matches.) Or... it just might be bad luck that no one else with his specific subvariant of H3w has tested at FTDNA. (For example, my mt haplogroup is 7 characters long, and my Y haplogroup is 13 characters long.)


1

If we suppose that there is no error in mtDNA mito-group detection, it means (and means ONLY) that you have no common direct maternal ancestor. I.e. you have no common mother, no common maternal grand-mother and so on. It does not mean that you are not related. I can suppose that your half-brother is in fact the son of brother of your mother. Or something ...


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