11

I suspect that your Martha and Pattie are the same people. It is known for nicknames / pet names to be used on the British census - not as a matter of course, but it's not unknown. The "What's In a Name" web-site has an entry for Pattie indicating that it can be used as a pet-name for Martha. It suggests that "areas of the southern United States, pre-1776, ...


10

Name changes are just awkward, and there's no real perfect way to handle them. The general standard is to record names as they were at birth. For example, in genealogies women are usually recorded under their maiden name not their married name. In the interest of equality I see no reason why the same principle should not apply to men who change their name. ...


7

The ethical way to proceed is to ask living persons their consent before adding them to a work of genealogy. Just as you wouldn't use a living person's DNA sample without explaining the purpose for which it would be used, and securing their informed consent, you should talk about these issues with a living person whose information you want to include and ...


6

I have a similar circumstance in my family tree. It may be relevant that this was in England and Wales (where I believe that, if somebody applies to be recognised officially as another gender, previous records are unavailable. So, except for the fact that I sought his records in a very narrow time window, the records would not match what I know. I recorded ...


6

It is not an uncommon occurrence in my family tree to find a person whose birth certificate contains a name they never used in their life. In my family tree, I have a set of triplets whose births were registered as Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Within two weeks their parents saw reason and they were christened William, Albert, and Percy, the names which – ...


6

The basic premise in family history is to start with what you know, and work backwards and outwards from that point in small increments to discover more. You want to be able to say with confidence, when you recognize a record associated with your relative, that you are looking at something that was recorded about your relative and not someone else with the ...


5

At least 3 approaches are possible and should be used in conjunction. Order your grandfather's SSN application (form SS-5). He was born more than 100 years ago, so his parents' names (assuming he included them) should not be redacted. Probably a more precise birth location would be recorded. If the application dates before he changed his name, the date that ...


5

You've done a really good job with the documents you have. Going through what you posted I came to the same conclusions. The most logical answer is that David and Jane only had one son. But all of the other possibilities are ones you laid out. I would say though it seems unlikely there could have been 3 boys. Two is more possible (though my money's ...


4

I would record both Francis and Francis Joseph as names he used -- my usual preference would be to record the name he was given at birth as his 'main name' and any other name he used as 'AKA'. This aligns with the convention of using a woman's maiden name (name at birth) as her primary name. But others will choose to record his main name as the one they ...


4

It appears there is no set standard in recording name changes. Some sites offer a special section to add an alias or alternate name, but if you're looking to print-out your family tree (like I am), there is no standard form. According to this guide found on a parenting site, you should use the birth name and add to your notes married names (or in your case ...


4

Ancestry's tree allows the addition of further names that are referred to as Alternate Names - an Alternate can be marked as the Primary if it is desired to swap them. That being so, I'd record each of the names separately and never as a composite. Which gets set as the Primary is a moot point. Tradition says that we should use the name at birth - I am ...


3

Yes, that is the basic strategy. You can use any of the main 4 DNA testing sites. These are the ones you can upload to Gedmatch and get usable raw data for. 23andme, FTNDA, AncestryDNA, MyHeritage. You might want to choose based on who has the best sale in the next month or two. You want an autosomal test. Of the above companies, only FTDNA offers ...


3

One site I use is Russian website translate.Yandex.ru which is a website, and that has a language "Translator" function ("Переводчик") on the main page's function bar. That translator is by comparison in my opinion overwhelmingly superior to Google's rinky-dink language translator. That being said, the Пекеводчик will provide audible pronunciations of some ...


3

I can't comment on the legal situation in NYC but I can give one pertinent example of a documented name change. My Great-great aunt, Augusta Barclay Bruce, emigrated to the USA in 1909. She informally (presumably) and intermittently altered her name in Kansas City by dropping the first name and using Barclay as her given name. She then moved to New York ...


3

I think that the implied sub-text here is that there is a correct way of using terminology. In my personal view, language changes and so there often isn't such a view. If it's a technical term, defined in law, say, we need to be careful / critical about changing it but otherwise, I think we simply need to ask whether the altered meaning is contradictory or ...


3

I am not certain that it is appropriate to use née in this way. Both Merriam-Webster.com and TheFreeDictionary.com seem to say that née is primarily: Used to indicate the maiden name of a married woman. but its other meaning may leave scope for you to use it as you have: Formerly known as In any event I would name your mother as: Rebecca "Rita" ...


3

My grandfather also left home and changed his name when young. In my case I found the answer on his marriage license. He listed his mother's name and her town. From that I found her marriage record, which showed her husband's name and that led me to my grandfather's birth record.


3

I found an Elizabeth Shown Mills post on her blog with A Dozen Conventions You Want to Know About. She says (Rule 2): "When the person used a nickname, we put that nickname in quotation marks after the given names. Example: Robert Edward “Ted” Turner." She also says (Rule 4): When we write the name of a married female of the past, we put the ...


2

You will stand the best chance if he only changed his surname, not his forename(s), and if you know the names of his immediate family (ie parents and siblings). That way you can find him by process of elimination - look in the census record for when he was a child for all instances of the parents' and siblings' first names all living together and with the ...


2

I'm not finding that spelling anywhere. I recommend trying Woytowicz or Wojtkiewicz or Woytasiewicz. Also try replacing the "Y" with a "J" in all these names.


2

I use FamilySearch a lot, from my experience it will depend on what name he legally used. They do not have a special name database, just what the records list. For instance I have one great uncle that was listed in one set of records twice; the surname was the same but one given had the middle initial the other did not; luckily the birth dates matched up. ...


2

It is quite common in Dutch Genealogy for someone to have a "roepnaam", which literally translates as "call name", i.e. what people generally call you, a bit equivalent to a nick name but it tends to be used by everyone, not just close friends for a nickname. See "Roepnaam" — a good Dutch word I usually indicate that this by placing that name in round ...


2

Related questions: Determining what records are available in a particular locale? Determining what records are available about a individual? To make a research plan for this family, I would start by making a list of the source records you have found so far. Make a timeline of the events, using paper, a spreadsheet, a table, index cards -- whatever tool ...


2

The way that I record such a person's name in an Ancestry online tree is: First and Middle Name: Harry William Last Name: Smith (Jones) - I place Jones in round brackets because it is a Last Name that he used (or was used for him) after the one given at birth/baptism. Suffix: "Buddy" - this field seems to get searched and to attract hints. Although this is ...


2

For written materials, I would follow what Elizabeth Shown Mills' said, as outlined in this previous answer. This answer is intended as a supplement -- a place to record technical information. Ancestry My experience with searching from an online Ancestry tree for women is that the search picks up the married surname and shows me records for people with the ...


2

Try looking in local courts in the areas where she was living. They may not be in a collection which is titled as such -- for one example, see the FamilySearch Research Wiki article New York Names, Personal which cites a collection Miscellaneous Filed Papers Index, 1812–1934 for New York County. The period you're looking at is post-Consolidation (see: ...


1

When I began filling out my tree software (I use Family Tree Maker for the Mac), I used AKA for most of the name variations I found. I found it not to be helpful in tracking those variations. Something that was very useful when looking at dates of other changes or in figuring out which leads to pursue. So I switched everything. I create a new Name fact ...


1

This discussion reminded me of a wonderful informative discussion about names that is relevant to all genealogists: http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/ WRT this example I do not believe that it's (culturally) appropriate to use née. Rather I think the right thing (TM) to do is to use Rita Lerner and have an "...


1

I find with married women's names it helps me keep things straight if I always use their birth name with the married name in (). They are already attached to their husband/married name already and for me it is just less clutter around a name. Ditto on prior answers being consistent is of utmost importance.


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