12

Tentatively, those names do look rather Spanish, but that need not mean much. However, Wikipedia's page on Spanish naming conventions notes that: Currently in Spain, people bear a single or composite given name (nombre) and two surnames (apellidos). ... Traditionally, a person's first surname is the father's first surname (apellido paterno), and the ...


7

In this case dit means alias. So Marie-Anne Romure was her given name but everyone knows her as Marie-Anne St Pierre and that is the name that she uses in every day life. There is a bit more information on this site that may help.


7

"i" means "and". They both were Catalan. Nowadays in Catalunya we still use both family names but only a few still use the conjunction "i" between them. Becouse of globalization it starts to be common to use only our first name. But our ID card has the two names. http://ca.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onom%C3%A0stica_jueva is a link to the wiki talking about the ...


6

Other answers have already confirmed that those are clearly Catalan surnames, although they are not very common - in fact, surnames of Catalan origin are very diverse, so they tend to be rare. I can confirm that "i" is just the conjunction "and" that is placed between paternal (first) and maternal (second) surnames in formal contexts. Here is some ...


5

Not properly. The reason to use the numeral is to distinguish two people with the same name. So if they have different middle names, no need to use the numeral. The Suffix (name) entry in Wikipedia notes: According to The Emily Post Institute, an authority on etiquette, the term Jr. can be correctly used only if a male child's first, middle, and last names ...


5

The usual standard is to record the name as on the birth certificate. Any embellishments like Sr/Jr would be recorded as a "Known As" data point rather than as part of the person's name. So, it depends on whether you have any information as to how the people were usually known. Some families will actively use the Sr/Jr epithet to refer to their family ...


4

You say "in family trees", but I'm wondering if you mean generally in genealogical software products -- this would include those more devoted to family history than just trees. In both scenarios, it probably depends on which actual tree or product since there are no standards here. A person very likely had more than one preferred name (e.g. formal versus ...


4

The French dit identifier is identifying something or referring to something about the person or person's family. It is not a conveyance such as de or du. It is not an alias, nickname or last name which are incorrect English translations! French "dit" or "dite" names were''' identifiers''' used by French families,  that describe the person based on a ...


2

I'm not certain that this question is on-topic for G&FH SE, but I will attempt to answer it anyway. The way that I read the relevant Wikipedia pages is that: Baldwin II was succeeded by his daughter Melisende and her husband Fulk Melisende's son became Baldwin III Baldwin III was childless and succeeded by his brother, Amalric I Amalric I was succeeded ...


2

As noted in another answer, junior and senior as used in records simply to distiguish BY AGE two people of the same name AT THAT POINT IN TIME. I've actually run across records that had a third individual, of intermediate age, who was identified as "mediocris," to distinguish him from "senioris" and "junioris". These were in church parish records, so all ...


1

Conventional wisdom is that Junior and Senior are used to distinguish a younger from an older person of the same name. Further, it is said that the two need not be related in any fashion. I don't remember seeing an unrelated pair myself, but that's what is said.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible