10

Name changes are just awkward, and there's no real perfect way to handle them. The general standard is to record names as they were at birth. For example, in genealogies women are usually recorded under their maiden name not their married name. In the interest of equality I see no reason why the same principle should not apply to men who change their name. ...


10

PolyGeo's answer is correct that the names in parentheses are nicknames. It is quite common to include nicknames in either parentheses or quotation marks, and usually it is more clear than this particular case that those names are nicknames. Betty's obituary can be found in the Winnipeg Free Press in 2010, which states she was: Fondly known as Boozy ...


7

Names around the world do not follow the Western conventions that we're so familiar with. In particular, the use of upper- and lower-case characters. Some languages do not have such a concept because their script (the symbols used to write it) does not have it. In some, the usual capitalisation of the first letter may actually apply to the the second letter (...


7

In the colonial period, language usage for kinship terms (and other terms) was not necessarily the same as it is today. Several of the 'how to' books I've read have said that in the colonial period, 'junior' and 'senior' were not necessarily indicative of father/son, but simply meant 'the younger' or 'the elder' if there were two men with the same name in ...


6

The problem with using "current" names as the only name, is that "current" changes over time. Is the Crimea part of the Ukraine or of Russia. If you attempt to use "current" you're dooming yourself to a never ending job of updating locations. I prefer an approach, supported by the tool I use, Genbox, that uses the name at the time of the event which links ...


6

Oooh, I like this question. And I have data to contribute! This data set is from the Israel Genealogy Research Association's "All Israel Database" (http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php) which, as of August 2015, covers over 576,000 records that were collected in, or chiefly about, the land of Israel in its Ottoman period, British Mandate period, and ...


6

I think the most likely reason for the name in brackets to be considered important enough to place on their headstone would be that it represents the name that they used between them and/or amongst their friends and family. I think that they are both nicknames. Perhaps Betty enjoyed a drink, and people thought Hymie was too long to always say in full. ...


5

The usual standard is to record the name as on the birth certificate. Any embellishments like Sr/Jr would be recorded as a "Known As" data point rather than as part of the person's name. So, it depends on whether you have any information as to how the people were usually known. Some families will actively use the Sr/Jr epithet to refer to their family ...


5

I suggest that you start at our portal: https://gramps-project.org/wiki/index.php?title=Portal:Using_Gramps There's a lot to read over there, including suggestions on how to record data in various forms. On the subject of marriage, Gramps is not much different from other GEDCOM based software, in the sense that you can follow what I think is common. You ...


5

The document is a registration card issued by Central Committee of Polish Jews - Division of Records and Statistics. Line 1 gives the last name of the person (although both are given on this line), in this case Elka Fleker; Line 2 is supposed to be the first name; Line 3 is the birthdate and location - only the year 1914 and town appears to be Mir; Line ...


5

Not properly. The reason to use the numeral is to distinguish two people with the same name. So if they have different middle names, no need to use the numeral. The Suffix (name) entry in Wikipedia notes: According to The Emily Post Institute, an authority on etiquette, the term Jr. can be correctly used only if a male child's first, middle, and last names ...


4

It was likely Velikaya Kosnitsa. It had sizeable Jewish population in the beginning of XX century: http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/GEO_town.asp?id=313 Here is some additional info about it (Russian language only):http://jukraine.org/vinnickaya-oblast/velikaya_kosnica/


4

The GEDCOM Standard 5.5.1 makes it quite clear that an unknown name (given name or surname) should be left blank: NAME_PERSONAL:= {Size=1:120} [ <NAME_TEXT> | /<NAME_TEXT>/ | <NAME_TEXT> /<NAME_TEXT>/ | /<NAME_TEXT>/ <NAME_TEXT> | <NAME_TEXT> /<NAME_TEXT>/ <NAME_TEXT> ] ...


4

You say "in family trees", but I'm wondering if you mean generally in genealogical software products -- this would include those more devoted to family history than just trees. In both scenarios, it probably depends on which actual tree or product since there are no standards here. A person very likely had more than one preferred name (e.g. formal versus ...


4

It appears there is no set standard in recording name changes. Some sites offer a special section to add an alias or alternate name, but if you're looking to print-out your family tree (like I am), there is no standard form. According to this guide found on a parenting site, you should use the birth name and add to your notes married names (or in your case ...


4

I would record both Francis and Francis Joseph as names he used -- my usual preference would be to record the name he was given at birth as his 'main name' and any other name he used as 'AKA'. This aligns with the convention of using a woman's maiden name (name at birth) as her primary name. But others will choose to record his main name as the one they ...


4

Keep in mind, in 1885 Poland did not exist as an independent country, and the population was rather mixed between speakers of different languages. On top of this (and partly because of this), people did migrate internally, marry between different groups, and the family language (and later, own perception of their nationality) would change. Feltman (and its ...


3

So far as I can see, neither the GEDCOM 5.5 nor 5.5.1 specifications have an item that enables one to record which given name is actually used in normal life. That suggests that, with no target to aim for, each program may very well have its own conventions. The software I use, for instance (Family Historian from Calico Pie), has an item "Given Name used" so ...


3

The suffix "Junior" could have been used for a number of reasons, none of which are particularly specific to the United States or Scotland. There is not and has never been a formal definition of its use. The main idea is that there was a need to differentiate between two people of the same name - usually this is because there is a father and son of the same ...


3

Most of my British ancestors have only one or no middle name which makes it easy i.e. I would leave the middle name field blank for those without one. However, my 4th great grandmother (Louisa Dorothea Wedderburn Hope Moore) does have four personal names like your worst case so I will use her as an example of what I do in Ancestry.com which has two name ...


3

Excellent work showing the cross-cultural regularity. Collecting the name data and summarizing it reasonably is a huge amount of work. Thank you for your contribution to public knowledge! Unfortunately, the regularity is difficult to understand. You stated: There is actually a reasonable explanation for this pattern: a tendency to name sons after ...


3

Bottom Line: There is some evidence that the tendency for a few given names to dominate is also seen elsewhere in Europe, even if the top names are not John and Mary Evidence Point 1: Lowland Scotland Lowland Scotland is not that far removed from England anyway, but I now have evidence that the same concentration exists there too. I have (laboriously) ...


3

In Family Historian, which is the software I use, the user can customise the fields available in the Records View screen, which is the screen that looks like a spreadsheet. For a screenshot, see What's New in Family Historian 6 and look at the screenshot next to Quick Filtering in Lists. I have added a Custom fact called "Who" where I can add a line of ...


2

In general, I would say that there is certainly nothing wrong with using the word county when referencing a US place name. In some cases, it is necessary in order to correctly identify the location. For instance, Wikipedia claims (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_towns_in_New_York) that there are 11 pairs of towns in New York that share the same name ...


2

Q1 :Is there any reason not to use the words "County" or "Co" for some or all American county names?" My practice is to do what makes the data the least ambiguous. For instances, in counties unlike San Francisco (which is "the City and County of San Francisco" i.e. they cover the same geographical area), where you have a city name which is the same as the ...


2

I'm not certain that this question is on-topic for G&FH SE, but I will attempt to answer it anyway. The way that I read the relevant Wikipedia pages is that: Baldwin II was succeeded by his daughter Melisende and her husband Fulk Melisende's son became Baldwin III Baldwin III was childless and succeeded by his brother, Amalric I Amalric I was succeeded ...


2

Parish registers in the Church of Scotland tend to be less well organized and structured than their counterparts south of the border in England. Particularly in highland parishes, sometimes no parish records survive at all from the eighteenth century or earlier. This is due primarily to the fact that the ecclesiastical laws pertaining to the maintenance of ...


2

It is largely a matter of personal preference, but the convention I have sometimes seen used is to include the "unused" first name in parentheses. For example, for Walter Peter Nobb who was known as Peter: (Walter) Peter NOBB My preference for the purposes of maintaining my family tree database is to record all individuals by their birth names and ...


2

Whereas a nickname or abbreviated name, might be enclosed in quotes (e.g. Anthony "Tony" Proctor), using a middle name (there may be several to pick from) already has a precedent in Germany. Their "rufname" (or "call name") is the one they choose to be called by. It is often underlined on official documents as it could be the second or third name in the ...


2

I have definitely seen the male name Jno on records. I always thought maybe it was a misspelling, but maybe it is correct. You can search for naturalization records, if doesn’t give original name, you may get date, ship name and town. Then you can search on Stevemorse.org and look up the ship and date, and check the manifest for all names, search for the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible