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6 votes

Reading given name of German great-grandaunt?

I also found it useful to have this PDF around for comparing the letters. The benefit being you can zoom it in quite a bit: https://feefhs.org/sites/default/files/guide/german-gothic.pdf Once you get ...
Luke Quinane's user avatar
5 votes

Was traditional Scottish naming pattern the same for Highlands, Lowlands and Ulster Scots?

I get both cynical and concerned about naming patterns. Concerned in case people use naming patterns to prove genealogy rather than genealogy to prove naming patterns. Cynical because my great ...
AdrianB38's user avatar
  • 11.6k
4 votes

Was traditional Scottish naming pattern the same for Highlands, Lowlands and Ulster Scots?

I have found Scottish naming patterns to be a useful starting point in researching my ancestors in early North America - not proof, but a starting point for a line of inquiry in the absence of hard ...
miz_mdk's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes
Accepted

Why were there no Polish given names in Polish village (part of Prussia)?

The most likely reason is that the Catholic priest was German. Back then the baby's names had to correspond to a canonized saint's name. So whatever name the parents gave the child, the priest would ...
Rusty Erpenbeck's user avatar
2 votes

Why might name Ferdinando be found in early 17th century Cornwall baptisms?

I have a Ferdinando too, and fondly imagined I might have a shipwrecked Spaniard in my tree. However, I think the answer is in the name of Sir Ferdinando Gorges c1565-1647, governor of Plymouth. He ...
Fee Berry's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes

Is there a chart type that shows myself, a chosen ancestor, every intervening ancestor and their siblings?

It took me a full day to get this chart done, but here are two solutions: (A) Graphic box chart with photos and some facts (birth, death) (1) Isolate your dataset of names you want to include and ...
Roger Pearce's user avatar
2 votes

Can one known use of a name be regarded as a nickname?

Frank and Francis are the same name; one is from the Old German for "a Frenchman", the other is from the Latin for same, transmitted via Italian. E.G. Withycombe's Oxford Dictionary of English ...
JPmiaou's user avatar
  • 1,159
1 vote
Accepted

Creating record for individual where no details are known?

Ideally, there should be a record created for the father. Everyone has/had one, even if the details are unknown. Having a record for them allows you (or someone else) to add sketchy details if and ...
ACProctor's user avatar
  • 5,907
1 vote

Creating record for individual where no details are known?

I have created no-name records because they are a natural home for research notes detailing what searches I have done looking for him. Aside from that, there isn't really any reason that I can see to ...
AdrianB38's user avatar
  • 11.6k
1 vote
Accepted

Norwegian naming conventions

You could try contacting an ex-pat organization like "The Sons of Norway" if you can. Since they often have maintaining culture as part of their mission, explaining recent naming conventions might be ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 26
1 vote

People who give their children the same first name as themselves

This often happened if the first child or children died young. I have several ancestors of the 17th or 18th centuries where a child John was born and died in infancy. Another son was born and also ...
Chenmunka's user avatar
  • 1,440
1 vote

Did son-in-law have a different meaning in mid-19th century England?

According to the OED (Oxford English Dictionary), son-in-law also meant stepson as late as the 1730s. Consider that the OED usage patterns are estimates based on printed, often mainstream sources. I'...
tepary66's user avatar
  • 121

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