8

For my one-place study of a parish in the East Midlands, I transcribed all entries in the 1939 Register. I then individually cross-referenced the birth date of each entry with a secondary source (either civil registration or parish record). This enabled me to assess how frequently the birth date given on the 1939 Register matched with the secondary source. ...


6

There might be ED maps at The National Archives, but so far, I haven't been able to determine a good archive reference for them. Searching on Discovery, the catalog of The National Archives, for the keywords "RG 101" and "maps" brought me to this page describing Records of the General Register Office, Government Social Survey Department, ...


6

It's simply a way of distinguising households/institutions. According to the National Archives Information is arranged by: enumeration district – each enumeration district has a unique four- or five-letter code, and large enumeration districts may comprise more than one book household or institution – each household or institution is ...


5

In the Lost Cousins newsletter dated 1st March 2016, Peter Calver posted his own entry from the NHS Central Register, from one of the later registers. In the newsletter, he shows that the right-hand side has a jumble of codes which he interprets as a list of the places he has lived and some dates. He notes that the format of the register that holds his ...


4

The omitted columns are #11 and #12. On FMP's Original Forms page, the Enumerator's Instructions sheet states: Column 11 - The enumerator may be instructed not to transcribe the schedule entries as to "Membership of Naval, Military or Airforce Reserves, etc., or Civil Defence Services, etc." from column G of the schedule [...]. But if he is instructed to ...


4

If you want strict Gedcom compliance, then your only options are 'Census' and 'Residence'. (Some programmes will allow you to generate custom events, but those won't 'travel well'). I would use 'Census'. Although not actually a Census, it was: designed to capture the details of every member of the civilian population on a specific date (from the National ...


4

If you look at the page 1939 Register Service on the Health & Social Care Information Centre website, the site says: The 1939 Register Service (cost recovery) enables you to request data held on the 1939 Register for England and Wales, as recorded on 29 September 1939. After explaining what data can be found on the Register and whose information ...


3

Peter Calver's special edition of his Lost Cousins newsletter shows a screen grab that he took from a FindMyPast promotional video - see the heading "What aren't we seeing?" in the linked newsletter (given that the copyright will belong to either FMP or PC, I am not including the image itself here). Though fuzzy (possibly deliberately for confidentiality ...


3

Audrey Collins' blog post National registration day: 29 September 1939 says: The completed household schedules were collected and returned to each local National Registration Office, but they did not remain there. Each person’s details were transferred to index cards, and the original forms were sent to the local Food Office, for the preparation ...


3

I asked this question directly on Facebook. The response I recieved is that, yes: "The Register was updated until 1991 when it ceased to be a working document". This means that for married women, "in the vast majority of cases" they will be recorded under both their married and maiden names. They say, "We'll be showing both maiden and married names and ...


3

The 1939 Register, much like the decennial censuses before it, was actually compiled from household schedules. The enumerator dropped off the schedule to each house a few days before National Registration Day (29 Sep 1939). The format of the schedule looked like this: Source: Histpop.org Each schedule in each enumeration district was assigned a unique ...


2

I would say that the answer depends on what you are going to use your data for. In my case I enter the 1939 as a census but when I produce reports for general consumption, I omit all types of census and just print the information about the person. What matters is their job, residence, birth details, etc. It's hardly that interesting to know that they were ...


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