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One possible avenue of research is to look for Naturalization records. You have the certificate and you know the court which issued it. The National Archives' introductory section on finding Naturalization records is here: http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/#find For records prior to 1906, they say: "Contact the State Archives for the state ...


5

There are several factors to consider in this particular situation. 1) There is generation trait decay of what has been identified as specific attributes that might characterize one as having "Native American" ancestry as described in the Generational Loss of Data with DNA testing where traits may only carry about 50% from generation to generation. This is ...


5

Unfortunately, there isn't a DNA test that will give you a specific tribe or region. Also, all/most indigenous American populations will appear as Native American in your Ancestry DNA results. Your best bet for determining tribe/region is to work on your paper trail. Another thing to think about is that 32% is high for a single great-grandparent being the ...


4

In a footnote in Kirsty Gover's Tribal Constitutionalism (p 122), citing an interview with genealogist Rita Souther, the author notes that N.E. stood for Not Eligible: Some base rolls exclude non-Indians recorded on the basic roll, for instance by identifying those recorded as 'N.E.', or 'Not Eligible', indicating that the person was deemed to not be ...


3

You get approximately 1/2 (50%) of your DNA from each parent. They get 50% of their DNA from each of their parents, and so on, which leads to this list: 1 generation back: 50% 2 generations back: 25% 3 generations back: 12.5% 4 generations back: 6.25% 5 generations back: 3.125% 6 generations back: 1.5625% ... and so on. So, your 3.46% measurement ...


3

Before you put a lot of work in chasing what might be a shadow, learn more about ethnicity estimates and about how DNA works in general. Estimates Ethnicity estimates are a guess -- they are made by comparing test subjects' DNA to a selected group of people called a "reference population" or "reference panel". Suppose you are setting up your own site to ...


3

I'd like to throw a possible scenario into the mix, that may be impossible to prove or disprove. Facts: Russia "owned" Alaska until 1867 (Alaska Purchase). The Aleut and Yup'ik live in the Aleutian Islands and western Alaska. They had early contact with Russians. The Trans-Siberian Railway was built 1891 to 1916. The Navajo live primarily in Arizona and ...


3

This happened to me as well at Ancestry. I did 2 things. I took another DNA test thru another company and found out that I have 2 markers for Native Americans; they also have an extensive database!! I also downloaded my Ancestry.com results and uploaded to Gedmatch.com. I then saw my Native American results and could even see how much on each chromosome. ...


2

Mother said her Grandfather, was supposed to have been here in the United States during some kind of fighting w/the Indians in the West. Now he either captured her or married....my late older brother was telling me this. My Mother said that her Father's Father was a Swede & that her Father's Mother was a Navajo Indian. This is what her Father, William ...


2

Start by writing down everything you know about your 'American ancestry'. Interview older relatives who may know something about this side of your family. Begin with the most recent generation and get names, birth/marriage/death dates for every name, and then double-check those with actual BMD certificates from relevant states and cities in the USA. Once ...


1

This question isn't a good fit for this site. We can't tell you how FamilySearch would like you to index this record -- only FamilySearch can do that. "What does the 'nE' in the census number column mean?" is a very good question to ask, but you haven't told us what kind of record this is, or what the batch is, or anything that would help us to identify ...


1

Is the percentage given so low as to be possibly within the margin of error? Have any of your other relatives taken a DNA test - what did they say? This might allow you to at least work out what side of the family you should be looking on. How far back do you "know" your ancestry? Do you have documentation for this - if not try to find proof for ...


1

For every generation, divide by 2. Your great-grandmother was 1/4 Cherokee, your grandmother 1/8 Cherokee, your mother 1/16 Cherokee, and you are 1/32 Cherokee, assuming that no other of your ancestors had Cherokee blood (actually, DNA). If your Cherokee ancestor was your mother's mother's mother's mother, you would have 100% Cherokee mitochondrial DNA, ...


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