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12

I think (having looked at the full page on FindMyPast) that it probably actually says "were" so that it reads: John Smith Captains Clarke of his Majestys Ship Firm and Sarah Osment of St Andrews Plymouth a minor with consent of parents were married in this church by licence this thirteenth Day of July in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty ...


10

As @TomH indirectly suggests, it is possible to request your father's Service Records from the UK's Ministry of Defence. See https://www.gov.uk/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records, in particular the section "Service records of deceased Service personnel". Obtaining Service Records has a bad reputation because of the time it takes and the ...


8

When a straightforward search for a record comes up empty, I think it's important to step back and look at the larger picture, so that one can understand the context of the record -- that often leads to clues about where one might find it. The question as posed actually has two separate questions in it. One is to find out more about the incident in which ...


7

Ancestry has "UK, Navy Lists, 1888-1970" - these include "multiple volumes of the Navy List, the Royal Navy’s official published list of officers." There are 4 records for your father (1941, 42, 44 and 1945 - I'd guess he's in the 1943 as well but it's not indexed?) p.1639 of Volume II of the July 1945 list (I don't know how often the paper versions were ...


6

The US Department of the Navy (which is NOT the United States Navy) provides a governmental organisational structure to oversee the Navy. By 1938 it was structured to include a number of "Bureaus" including the Bureau of Navigation (Bur. Nav.) which had responsibility for Navy personnel, the Hydrographic Office and the Naval Observatory. In 1942 the Bureau ...


5

At the risk of further muddying the waters, “The Life and Services of Horatio, Viscount Nelson” by James Stanier and John M’Arthur gives the following details of the life of Donald Campbell: Born 1764, the eldest son of Major Donald Campbell of Islay. Procured commission as Ensign in 74th Regiment of Highlanders at the age of 13 (!) and served as ensign and ...


5

This image is from the unit muster for whichever unit he was in at the time. It is a chronological record of who was in the unit at the time. The muster is created when the unit is formed and then updated monthly with any unit activity such as personnel joining, transferring, discharging, etc. In this case it is for the month of July, 1948. The 4 in ...


5

"Would an enlisted Royal Navy man marry onshore?" The only alternative that I can think of, is that he would be married by a Royal Navy Chaplain on board ship. The relevant National Archives (TNA) Piece appears to be RG 33/156 "H.M. Ships: Marriages solemised on board HM ships during 1842-1879". (See TNA Catalogue description). This appears to be only ...


4

As I understand, you have no other specific record that would link John Smyth to Wales. With this in mind I first think you should not get too caught up in the spelling of the name - John Smyth, John Smith, John Smythe. While the Smyth spelling may be less common, the spellings may have been phonetically identical. You should be prepared to see variability ...


4

You may want to submit a Request for personal data and service records to the Ministry of Defence. I does not sound like the The National Archives (TNA) has complete Royal Naval Reserve (RNR) records which may explain your issue.


3

A 'real Object of Charity' was somebody who was "blameless" (or whose parents were "blameless") in spite of needing charity. The specific form of words seems to have been widely used since at least the mid 18th century. From The Parliamentary History of England from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803: Volume 9 dated 1811: For this reason, great care ...


3

The National Archives' research guide Looking for records of a person in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve warns: Many records are online, but it is important to note that not all records survive. So this could be a coverage problem (your Dad is right but your grandfather's records didn't survive), or it could be that whatever material survives is not ...


3

IIRC the American Battle Monuments Commission returns the service numbers as part of their search results. If he's not listed there, The National Gravesite Locator lists gravesites of veterans. See also U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962, U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963, and the U.S., Department of ...


3

Some ships were sent from Flanders to Scotland to return survivors back to Spain. A full account of the fate of survivors can be found in: The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland by Ken Douglas (Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, 2009). No names, only what happened to them.


3

Looks like the MARINE CORPS INDIVIDUAL RECORDS ADMINISTRATION MANUAL (SHORT TITLE: IRAM) is one good reference for some of these. CHAPTER 6 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS begins on (actual document) Pg.# 6-3 (177 of 259 in PDF) and continues on to the list a few pages later. das - DAYS B&W - BREAD-WATER CO - COMMANDING OFFICER OH - OPERATIONAL HANDBOOK ...


3

If your Dad was in the Royal Navy, rather than the merchant navy: WW2 service records are still held by the Ministry of Defence; this page on the MOD website tells you how you can get a copy: https://www.gov.uk/get-copy-military-service-records/apply-for-someone-elses-records. Merchant Navy Merchant Navy records up to 1941 are held by The National ...


2

If your father was an "Officer" in the Royal Navy during WWII He will be listed in the Royal Navy bi-annual "NAVY LIST". These "Navy Lists" record all British RN Officers and the ships upon which they served. This is a good starting point to: determine whether your father was a serving Naval Officer during WWII (if he was not an officer he will not be ...


2

The Imperial War Museum may be able to help http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections-research The family history notes from the Imperial War Museum at http://archive.iwm.org.uk/upload/pdf/famhist-mnavy2010-4.pdf may also help


2

The Marine Corps Muster Rolls have always presented very peculiar abbreviations and references. In this case, the first "No" column indicates how many Marines are counted within that particular rank, in this case, he is a Corporal (newly promoted on the 30 Jul, 1948). The name and service numbers are obvious, the "Spec. No.", is what we now call the "MOS", ...


2

There is a chapter with photos on both HMS Royal Arthur and HMS Glendower in The Reminiscences of a Radar Plotter by John Barford Lindop ( Amazon Books ) where all, well some, will be revealed.


2

The Captains' Log Books in series ADM 51 have the following catalogue description: These logs were maintained by the captain of each ship in commission, and kept in manuscript form on a continuous daily basis. They cover details of the employment and position of the ship and ship's company, details of weather encountered, and provide a full picture ...


2

http://westmayo.ie/german-submarines-in-north-mayo/ Memoirs of Henry, Michael. "BMH.WS1732", Page 3. http://www.militaryarchives.ie/collections/online-collections/bureau-of-military-history-1913-1921/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1732.pdf A German submarine made contact with some fishermen off the coast. A fuelling was established. Our organisation had nothing ...


2

One clue I would consider is the rank mentioned for the individual in the linked question. The Steward in 18th century British navy was a civil position, hired by the Captain. If we look at Wikipedia page describing Royal Navy Ranks and look at the description in the entry for Steward: A more senior cook and servant, usually reserved for flagships and ...


1

I don't know if this will help or make things worse. The vital and church records of Quebec (Collection Drouin) shows one Edward McDowell, baptized September 27, 1820, born August 22nd on a ship from Quebec City going up to Montreal. The parents names do not match the ones you gave however, the document is hard to read but the father appears to be one ...


1

A starting point for researching Italian Navy personnel may be La Regia Marina: If the information you are searching for are about a sailor who was your relative, and you know his name and (at least approximately) his place and date of birth the way to follow is to obtain from Italian Navy his service records ("Estratto del foglio matricolare" are ...


1

I have now seen the six documents mentioned in the question and transcribed them: 1. THESE are to Certify, That John Smyth Son of Jeremiah Smyth Mariner, by Mary his Wife, of the Parish of St Botolph Aldgate in the County of Middlesex is a real Object of Charity. In Witness whereof we the under-written Minister and Church-Wardens of the said ...


1

If your father is no longer alive, and you are his 'Next of Kin' you can apply for his service record. You have to do this direct from the Royal Navy and on payment of a fee they will send you his records. See their website for information on how to do this (item 3 on the page). Royal Navy Research Archive If he is not deceased then they will not supply the ...


1

Source: the appendix of 'The Clan Campbell' by Major Sir Duncan Campbell, Vol IV, MacNiven & Wallace (Pub) 1916. pp397-401. Location: National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh. This book contains a letter from AH McLean to the editor of the Oban Times. McLean states that he conducted searches of the Admiralty records and that Donald was born on the ...


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