6

For a non-extant building, the "National Register of Historic Places" will probably help you only if the building was registered and then later destroyed in some catastrophic way. http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/about.htm However, you can also try the "Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscapes Survey". ...


6

Via a Google Search, I found a page on the Family Search Wiki that has several reference articles on researching women ancestors. Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online course Research: Grandmothers, Mothers and Daughters-Tracing Women offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. To learn more about this course or ...


5

How do we evaluate the published work of other genealogists? That's a very good question, whether we are talking about a book publication, or someone's online tree on services such as Ancestry or RootsWeb or others which allow the publication of genealogies that are owned by one individual. One place to turn for an answer is the Board for Certification of ...


5

Assuming this is "New England Marriages Prior to 1700" by Clarence Almon Torrey, there is a rather good guide to that 12-volume set at americanancestors.org here (TorreyIntro.pdf). It's worth reading the entire document as it explains all the quirks of Torrey's indexing system. It includes a number of relevant notes (edited for brevity, bolding added by me)...


5

If you have early New England ancestors, you are lucky. The Puritans and Pilgrims were record keepers. They recorded vital information in church books, clerk's offices, quarterly court records, probate records, journals, and family Bibles. As has been mentioned, the various coastal Massachusetts town records start nearly as soon as the planters arrived. In ...


3

A blogger who writes about the town I'm researching posted a list of named apartment buildings, taken from a 1950 City Directory. So -- just like a residence event for a person -- this establishes those buildings as still standing as of the time that information was collected, and gives me a list of addresses to cross-check with the residences I have in ...


3

If a book's author does not cite sources for its information then I think that you will need to start searching the historical records until you find the information that you are trying to verify. I recommend starting with pieces of information that are close to the present time to double-check that the ancestors you find are actually those that the book ...


2

You don't list the publication date, but if either of the authors is still living, you could track them down and inquire about their sources. I realize this is probably not an option, as the older a published genealogy is, the less likely it is to be sourced, and also less likely to have living authors.


2

Honestly there is no such thing as "generally accurate" in genealogy. Within a compiled genealogy you can find examples of accurate and inaccurate information. For example, information on generations closest to the author might be very accurate, based on first hand knowledge. More remote generations might be based on original source records, family stories,...


2

A birth record simply might not exist. Not everyone registered their children's birth with he town clerk, even though that was the law. I'd recommend broadening the question. Instead of looking for a "birth record," frame it as looking for "date of birth, place of birth and parents" with understanding that these facts can come from any number of ...


1

More recent analysis is in The Great Migration, volume IV. Robert Charles Anderson there gives a good summary of the evidence, too lengthy to repeat here (a 5-page entry for Thomas Joslin). But he does conclude that his father was Ralph.


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