4

It looks like "About" (compare it with the same word in the next column), which would make the entry read: Glasgow, Scotland. About 4 years, Victoria; 29 years, South Australia; 14 days, N.S.Wales.


3

I suspect that in 1890 H.M. may be Her Majesty's but C. might be Customs, Commissioner, Cutter or something else. The asker commented: I found Sands dir's in Ancestry. Found no list of abbr'ns there. I searched Trove newspapers for Henry Gill. Found other names in Sands with "HMC" and searched Trove for their names hoping to see what HMC means. ...


3

Australia’s equivalent of Companies House May be worth a search http://asic.gov.au/online-services/search-asics-registers/ I don’t know if any statutory business records go to National Archives of Australia


3

In the USA, when funeral homes were sold, sometimes the records were passed along to the newer company, so tracing the company's history can be a pointer to the records. Another approach is to contact local historical associations and archives, to see if business records of defunct companies or older records of continuing companies have been donated. For ...


3

It seems from a court case reported in the papers in 1904 that the company proprietors of P. Kirby and Son seem to have been Mrs Elizabeth Kirby and her son William Henry Kirby. There is also a description of the company from a newspaper in 1908. The company went through a re-structure in 1920. Researching the directors named in the article might give a ...


2

There are a number of ways money might have been sent abroad. But in your case it would have probably have been via a company. Around the time that countries and empires had colonies in the Americas and Australia, companies such as Western Union started to emerge due to the increased need (or want) to send money back and forth to family members. These ...


2

The drawing staff of the Surveyor-General's Department (says the "Public Service Review" has sustained a severe loss in the sudden death of Mr. Robert Sellers, who had scarcely passed the prime of life. He was away on leave in Sydney and dropped down in the street during the recent oppressive weather in that city, heart failure being the cause. He ...


1

I don't think you can assume that Robert and Campbell were together. According to victorianrailways.net, which has a 1905 rail timetable example, a typical Melbourne-Sydney journey was around 24 hours, starting at 6 am. If Campbell were informed in Melbourne of Robert's hospitalisation on the 17th or death on the 18th, he could just about feasibly have ...


1

I think you may be making assumptions. Your mother is right, people would not travel over 1,000 km back then for a holiday. Sadly, wife beating was more or less the norm back then and may not have attracted any concern from other people, even in the family and women mostly got blamed for being beaten! Are we sure the father and son were actually ...


1

I just looked a little harder, and I am not sure whether this is new since last time I looked (I think thoroughly) but on the Contact Us page of Rookwood Anglican & General Cemeteries there is a Search Online link at the top. Unfortunately, it is currently reporting: Sorry – this feature is currently not available. I have phoned the cemetery (02 ...


1

Esther Emma Leach's father was a convict, John Woods alias Leach, who was transported for life for stealing a watch. He arrived in Sydney in Oct 1812 on the Earl Spencer. Despite receiving many Ticket of Leaves, he always re-offended and was sent to Morton Bay Penal Colony in 1834. He eventually obtained his conditional pardon in April 1847 and it is here ...


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