10

You've got several theories to test: Charles Graham is brother-in-law of Charles Cripps AND son of Anna AND full-brother of Catherine, or Charles Graham is brother-in-law of Charles Cripps AND son of Anna BUT half-brother of Catherine (and Johanna), or Charles Graham is brother-in-law of Charles Cripps BUT NOT son of Anna and NOT brother or half-brother of ...


9

2020 Update: For the content in this answer, assume that the user has an account with FamilySearch and has logged in to their account. 2017 Update: As of September 7, 2017, FamilySearch has discontinued distribution of microfilm. They are transitioning to digital records access. For the announcement on the transition, see the FamilySearch Newsroom ...


8

I'm not sure whether this works for all films, but when I check the catalog for church records of my home town here in The Netherlands, there is a message saying that the records are available on-line, as you can see here: https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/528701?availability=Family%20History%20Library When I follow the link at the end of the red ...


8

The critical part of the information is the GS Film number:1562175. If you go to the Family Search Catalog, paste this number into the search box labeled film/fiche number. You will see the following results: Manhattan (New York City) marriage records, 1866-1937 ; index to all boroughs, 1866-1937 Author: New York. Department of Health. Division ...


8

Since this record is fairly modern (1957) it seems likely those references are similar to, or the same as, the modern visa categories. Most of the entries on that page have a C-1 visa, which is a transit visa that only permits immediate onward travel to another country, and all of these have a destination in Canada, which is consistent with that. B-2 is ...


5

I'm consolidating my comments to the original question as a self-answer, to show the progress I made since I wrote the question, and to demonstrate the search techniques I've used so far. The 1930 Census record is still NOT FOUND, so I welcome other answers and suggestions, even if I eventually self-accept this answer. The article Sources of Genealogical ...


5

I do not know the answer to this. However, some of these points may be useful to prompt others: Any effective cross reference should not be from the film but from the collection(?) / batch(?) of source data. This is because a film could contain images of more than one type of record. I know several films at Chester are split - e.g. Church of England parish ...


5

Where else might information be lurking about these births and deaths? Death Records and Cemetery Information The Family History Library has a Register of New York City death records (update: this is no longer available to read online) describing what records the FHL holds. I haven't read the entire 209-page document yet, but when I was skimming it, this ...


5

If you haven't already, I would research the John Birch and Thomas H. Birch also living in Seneca Falls in the 1840 census. John is old enough to be a father, but he could also be a potential brother. Thomas is a good age to be a brother. I would also get his civil war record, if you haven't already, as it could include names of family members. My ancestor'...


5

Looks like this is on Broadway on the W 42nd St block. Changed a lot since this photo taken but on Google Streetview you can see the old building (now Knickerbocker Hotel) on the right is still standing, quite distinctive brickwork. Source: Google Streetview Found this by checking an old Manhattan directory for Broadway Bookshop and Florsheim - the ...


5

The initials identify the minister who officiated. The first thing that struck me was how modern and consistent the handwriting looked, and how clean and spare each entry. And sure enough, the opening page for this book of NYC marriages has the note "copied from a volume labeled Record of Marriages ... copied by Sterling Potter 1902-3". As the officient ...


5

According to the legend at the bottom of the page, BO stands for BORO (borough). The possible values are M: Manhattan, X: Bronx, K: Brooklyn, Q: Queens, R: Richmond (Staten Island), Z: at sea, and Y: out of city. The legend for age is N: minutes, H: hours, D: days, L: months.


4

The only passenger lists currently on-line for people leaving the U.S. are those for entry in the UK (as discussed in TomH's answer) and entry to Canada (not all crossing points). There may be archived copies in the various countries with international ports, but I have more than 15 such ports referenced in my database for relatives leaving Austria-Hungary. ...


4

As @ColeValleyGirl says, this is rather a broad question and it would be easier to give a more specific answer with more knowledge of what country they might have been going to. As far as I know there are no passenger lists for passengers leaving the US which means you will need to look for records of people arriving in Europe. Passengers arriving in the ...


4

Some new evidence came to light very recently. A William Sanderson, Tobacconist, of 18 Great Turnstile, Holborn, Middlesex, left a PCC will which was proved 10 June 1852. In the will he mentions brothers Charles James Sanderson, George Henry Sanderson and Edwin Sanderson. Given the occupation of William, it seems almost certain that he is the brother of the ...


4

Your best bet is to find your great-grandfather's US naturalization papers, and then work backwards from there to his original immigration records (probably ship, possibly land), and hopefully back from there to vital records that survived back in the Old Country. If you have access to Ancestry.com, either through one of their free trial weekends (which ...


4

This will be a multi-part answer because I am still not certain exactly what the question is asking. Since the original question suggests that the research subject may have come to the USA, I'll assume for the moment that the passenger in question came here. Q: How can I find someone's arrival and entry into the USA? The first rule of genealogy is "start ...


4

For a cold case, the questions I have would be: What happens to the case files for a cold case -- how long are the records kept? (my guess would be that the NYPD would hold on to the case files as long as the case was still open, but the only way to find out is to ask) and Could a file from 1907 be requested via the FOIL? (for information on how to do that,...


4

For an overview and timeline for New York Law, see the New York State Archives' research guide Naturalization and Related Records: Records of Name Changes. If you're looking for a formal legal document such as we might have in the 20th century, declaring the 'old name' and 'new name' of an immigrant, you may not find one for this period, especially if you ...


4

Most of this answer has negative search results -- because it's impossible to look for records online without first knowing more about the nature of the original records and their repositories. See the section below the line for new additions as records come online. The article New York City's Potter's Field: A Visit to Hart Island's Cemetery in Bronx ...


3

It looks to me that Charles Cripps married Catherine Meier and that Charles Graham married a Cripps. The relationships should all be relative to the head of the household.


3

Instead of looking at the search method you want to use, let's look at the characteristics of the single database or search portal that you are looking for: extensive coverage of New York and Pennsylvania vital statistics for all counties full birth dates with birth location for all entries birthdate range before 1860 It doesn't exist (yet). Early vital ...


3

Hypothesis: Could "317" be a case number in the New York, Queens County, mixed proceedings, 1899-1932 Mixed proceedings, case no. 305-319, 1902, DGS 5041799 (digital images online -- no microfilm) Note that the catalog says: Some cases do not have the number listed and may make it difficult to see where cases are divided. Many case number ranges ...


3

I can't comment on the legal situation in NYC but I can give one pertinent example of a documented name change. My Great-great aunt, Augusta Barclay Bruce, emigrated to the USA in 1909. She informally (presumably) and intermittently altered her name in Kansas City by dropping the first name and using Barclay as her given name. She then moved to New York ...


3

With the guidance received from your website, I was able to obtain a copy of the original NY Return of a Marriage for Consuelo Yznaga. As I suspected, the record that was posted on Family Search HAD been altered by Jorge Iznaga in order to reflect his spelling of the surname. I do not wish to share the complete record at this time, but am attaching the ...


3

It actually says "Illinois st, Detroit", but is part of the record above. If you go back up to line four and count down two lines (contact name and address) for each entry until number ten, you will see what I mean. The entry for line ten starts underneath, from "father", and is over two lines - the address looks like 325 ? 28th Street, New York. The ? ...


3

Update: I tried looking at a different directory, specifically: New York City directory, 1903/04 (Trow's general directory of the boroughs of Manhattan and Bronx, city of New York) The drop-down offers to show you batches of 100 pages "of 3,150 pages". The last page appears to be image 1625. The last image looks like the back cover of the directory. ...


3

This record appears to be an image copy of a page in a Manhattan borough death register. Unfortunately the person who shared it gave us no information about where he found this image. It may be a copy taken from the FHL film 447567 referenced in New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949, but it might not be; it could be from the Bodies in Transit ...


2

Dorothy Hoggard was one of the infants who died on the trip. Mary Shields and William Stetson McGrogan are my ancestors who were born aboard ship during that voyage. William Stetson McGrogan was born 5 May 1855 aboard the William Stetson. Another baby was born aboard ship and named William Stetson as was sometimes the custom to name a baby after the ship. ...


2

As @ColeValleyGirl says, there's a related question On what ship did Franz Joseph Kerber (1825-1873) immigrate to the US?, so let's attack the other question, "How can I find death information for Richard Turkington?" Since you have so little information about your 2g-grandfather, my advice would be to fill out more details of your great-grandfather's life ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible