7

Some states (like Florida and California) provide an index to divorce records to the public, but New York State apparently is not one of them. I'll provide some links to the information I have found so far, but this is one of the scenarios where it might be best to consult a professional with experience in that area. What Records Exist? The Family ...


6

0 (i.e. born before 20 Mar 1824). Anyone can be left a bequest in a will regardless of age - 1 day old or 100 years old. They need not even be born yet to be left a legacy. A will may or may not stipulate how the bequest should be handled in cases where the legatee is a minor. In those cases, the legacy may be paid out, for example, at age 21 or at marriage,...


6

Yes, in the Unites States in the eighteenth century you will tend to find more probate records for males than females. In his study, "Underregistration and Bias in Probate Records: An Analysis of Data From Eighteenth Century Hingham, Massachusetts", Daniel Scott Smith determined that less than 6% of women and 36% of men left wills. Similarly, inventories for ...


6

Historically, the letter "s" was often written more like a tall, looped "f", and a double "s" could look like "fs", or "p" if close together. So I'd guess this is "Mass", i.e. Massachusetts. It's referred to as the "long s" (Wikipedia).


5

Probate records for New York State are kept by the Surrogate's Court in each county. The website of the New York State Unified Court System says: Genealogy Research Since 1787, probate records like wills are filed and kept by the Surrogate's Court in each county. These records are available from the courthouse and appointments may be needed to view ...


5

The Bean household may have been living on Gates Street in Ogdensburg. Although the Bean family seem to be renters (per Jan Murphy's analysis), I checked adjacent census pages in case one of the near neighbours had real estate values marked and could be used to pin-point an address. (I looked only one page either side because of the likelihood that the ...


5

Not all states in the US allow their death records, or indexes to those records, to be published online. The Family Search Wiki's article How to Find New York Death Records gives a timeline for creation of state-wide death records, with pointers to the records depending on when they were created: Deaths from 1880 thru 1913 Starting in June 1880, ...


5

Since the information you have so far is not helping, it might be better to try an indirect approach. Here are some things to try. Make a list of all the source material you have about your grandmother's life, and then go through the documents systematically. Make a list of events and put them in order on a timeline. If your grandmother has siblings, do ...


5

Okay, so there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news first: At the moment (February 2019) all New York State adoptees' Original Birth Certificates (OBC's), and usually their adoption paperwork as well, are sealed. Totally sealed. Doesn't matter if the adoptees are dead, doesn't matter if they're alive and they already know all the info on the ...


5

The best available answer to this question is provided in the 16 page document The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 142 (2011) pages 5 through 20 , that describes the Cowen sisters introduction and involvement with genealogical research. That article leads to American Ancestors - the legacy of Gertrude Audrey Barber, that article details ...


4

I just came across this, as the 70th anniversary of Dixie Kiefer's death is approaching this year. I am a reporter at the Poughkeepsie Journal who is preparing a story about the crash. I also have copies of the Nov. 12, 1945 editions of our newspaper, which recount in detail the crash and search. And today, I hiked to the crash site, where wreckage of the ...


4

Since the 1870 Census did not record house numbers or street addresses, the address needs to be found by other means. From the instructions: Property.-Column 8 will contain the value of all real estate owned by the person enumerated, without any deduction on account of mortgage or other incumbrance, whether within or without the census subdivision or ...


4

Here are some resources to supplement the answer already given. In The Hidden Half of the Family, Christina K. Schaefer gives the following timeline for New York Probate laws (I've excerpted the relevant part from her larger timeline): 1771 private examinations and the practice of requiring a signature on a deed are enforced 1774 the intestacy law ...


4

I do research on Albany Rural Cemetery burials on a very frequent basis. The phrase "In whose lot interred" on the Albany Rural Cemetery burial index cards always refers to the person whose name is recorded on the lot deed (as in whomever purchased the lot). The party would not have to be living to be listed as the owner of the lot. The ownership of the ...


4

Well, I don't have a full answer to my question, but I do have a partial answer thanks to some impressively fast research by a coworker. It turns out, Department 67 was the department that made Remington-branded typewriters, and Department 66 appears to have made typewriters to sell to other companies so that they could rebrand them. While I did say that ...


3

With a nudge from @JanMurphy I went looking for and found Instructions For Taking the Census Of the State Of New York In the Year 1855; Issued By the Secretary of State, To the Officers Charged With the Duty Of taking It which says Relation to the head of the family. No entry should be made in this column opposite to the name of the head of the family, ...


3

For the Hudson Valley, what records you might find depends on what laws were in effect at the time; many historical records are generated as a direct result of some statute requiring that the information be collected. See How can I determine what records are available in a particular locale? for a general checklist on searching for records, and other ...


3

I think it is important to remember that most of the historical records we use for genealogy today were created for other purposes (not for genealogy). To find records, we have to understand why and how they were created. For civil records, that often means that some law was passed mandating that the records should be collected; those laws will say what ...


3

As you already know, in New York State, divorce records can be tricky to obtain. Dick Hillenbrand at the "Upstate New York Genealogy Blog", published this post in 2008. Although time has passed, NY hasn't done much, if anything, to loosen up vital records access, so it probably still applies: http://www.unyg.com/blog/index.php/2008/02/are-divorces-sealed-in-...


3

This is not a direct answer to the question but hopefully contains a few useful bits of information. First, the reason why you probably cannot find Peter and his family in the 1865 or 1875 New York State censuses is because those records for Westchester County have not survived. In fact, the first state census for this county to survive is from 1905. It is ...


3

The first of the five elements of the Board for Certification of Genealogist's Genealogical Proof Standard is to conduct a reasonably exhaustive search. The reasons why we want to do this are: Assumes examination of a wide range of high quality sources Minimizes the probability that undiscovered evidence will overturn a too-hasty conclusion So you've ...


3

Instead of looking at the search method you want to use, let's look at the characteristics of the single database or search portal that you are looking for: extensive coverage of New York and Pennsylvania vital statistics for all counties full birth dates with birth location for all entries birthdate range before 1860 It doesn't exist (yet). Early vital ...


3

The difficulty with finding death records is that, unfortunately, people can die anywhere. There's no guarantee you'll find them in their hometown. They could die at a hospital across a city or county line from their residence; they could die while visiting a relative, or they could die in transit. So one possibility would be to imagine where Sarah might ...


3

This answer includes some material which was originally left in comments and is incomplete. The question involves two different intertwined questions -- discovering what church the Sellars family might have attended, and discovering what records produced by those churches might have survived. Assuming that they attended a Presbyterian Church is a starting ...


3

It seems that George White's New York firm is looking to make collateralized loans. Harden & Co. and Lyman J. Strong are working as agents and mortgage brokers in various cities, verifying deeds and assets to approve borrowers. It is common today, but first became really practical after the invention of the telegraph. Your early ad dated 1843 is the ...


3

What records were created? Some clues to what records might have been created can be found by looking at modern-day requirements for starting a business, then researching when that requirement was made into law. Some examples: small businesses are usually required to have a business license, to publish notices to establish their name/DBA (Doing Business As)...


3

Looking for information on the connection between Winfield S Burns and General Winfield Scott the first thing was to do a general search. The bit about taking the spouses name seemed strange, and the following census info seemed to indicate that this wasn't the case: 1900 US Census 1880 US census This marriage record from New York, County Marriages, 1847-...


3

As far as I'm aware, it was a criminal offence to falsify a birth certificate in New York in 1927. That is not to say that people didn't do it, as evidenced by the case of the notorious child-trafficker Georgia Tann. Interestingly, the bill that sealed adoption records in NY state was signed by acting NY Governor Lehman, who had adopted his children from ...


2

In addition to the excellent answers already posted, I recommend some general research about the town of Saranac itself and the surrounding area. Map out a timeline of events which you have, and then try to discover what records might have been created during that time, what might still exist, and what repositories may hold them. Look for case histories ...


2

The Troy (New York) Irish Genealogy Society has published an index to Marriage Notices Appearing in Lansingburgh Newspapers 1787 – 1895, according to Dick Eastman's blog EOGN (posted on March 24, 2015). Eastman says: Lansingburgh, by the way, for those not in the Capital District Region, was the first chartered village in Rensselaer County and was ...


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