6

The BNA has the death notice in the Dundee Courier on Tuesday 13 June 1944. It's rather brief: ORMOND. At Dundee, on June 11, 1944, John Barclay Ormond, of 115 West High St., Forfar, husband of Elizabeth Cook. Funeral private. The record was slightly harder to find due to poor automated character recognition in the article - a common enough problem on ...


6

Personally I would parse it as follows: Deeply missed by their seven children (numbered 1-7) and their spouses, 26 grandchildren (letters a-z) and their spouses, and 7 great-grandchildren (letters A-G): 1. Ruth Simpson and her children a)Louise Kohler and Chris Harper, and A)Danielle; b)Shelagh and Leigh Potter and ...


5

Those numbers appear to have nothing to do with the obituary information. If you look at the rest of the full page you linked to, you'll see (2) and (c2) and (c8) and (c14) and other such codes in the same location after many of the want ads that are to the right of the obituaries you show in the image. It must be some sort of code used by the newspaper, ...


3

This answer is intended to complement the previous answer and to be more useful to the general reader. Instead of addressing this specific example (since the names have all been changed, none of the information can be verified), I'll leave an outline of my research process and the reasoning behind it. So what can one do when finding an obit, and the list of ...


3

Been tracking genealogy for many many years (via TMG), and I'm new to using Ancestry.com. After reading posts like this and doing a little testing, I've decided to handle obits two ways. First, I'll attach a photo to the person if I have a scan or a screenshot of the obit. Second, I'll transcribe the obit to a simple Google Doc on my own account (simple if ...


2

The primary newspaper for Midland, Texas, is the Midland Reporter-Telegram (found by searching for "newspaper" on the "Midland, Texas" wikipedia page). Google "midland reporter telegram archives" and one of the top hits is "Midland Reporter Telegram Newspaper Archives (1941-1977)


2

Many people will search for records by name first, and will find obituaries using newspaper subscription sites genealogy databases, like Ancestry & FamilySearch, which have obituary indexes, and may link to the to actual text Find-a-Grave and online family trees, where someone has attached the obituary But that's a minority of what's available. Let's ...


1

While you already have an answer to this question, it could be useful to describe a method to arrive at that answer. Look in the introduction of the book for an explanation of abbreviations. Almost all books that systematically use abbreviations will include an explanation (usually at the beginning of the book, but sometimes at the end). In Musgrave's case,...


1

It seems EM stands for "The European Magazine and London Review " and GM stands for "Gentleman's Magazine". Musgrave is an index so you would need to try to find the relevant entries in the magazines to see how much information was given. The GM 375 entry adds little other than a mention of Camberwell: https://books.google.com.au/books?id=gkMDAAAAMAAJ&...


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