9

The occupation is Möbelpolierer [furniture polisher] Probably different tasks depending on the employer: at a residence, a furniture store or a factory


7

Chemist is one of those occupations that has several meanings, each of which brings another web of meanings and qualifications. From what you say, my initial suggestion would be that she worked in a chemist's shop. (Chemist = Pharmacist ). Since my GGF Bruce did similar, I can confirm that in the 1920s it was just about possible to do that without formal ...


7

The Education Act of 1880 was the first to make education compulsory for English and Welsh children, but only between the ages of five and ten, and even then many parents did not send them to school as they needed the money - just as happens in many poor countries today. So, it is entirely possible, as you suggest, that a thirteen year old could have taken ...


6

You could try the national archives or The London Gazette newspaper. Most surviving historic business and trade records in the UK are held by local archives. I went via the national archives to find local directory for where my gguncle had gone since he'd left where the family had been, and still continued to be, to try and find out why he had gone 100 miles....


6

A bottom puller is an occupation in the manufacturer of shoes, so someone who worked on the soles of the shoes, but not likely in the assembly but literally making of the soles. It was likely someone else's job like a tacker to tack them on. At one point in history before heavy automation people had specialty occupations that were specialized to certain ...


6

If I am not mistaken this speciality code used for Airman who were linguistic experts working for the A F Electronics Security Command. The majority of whom I met, worked within top secret facilities. These individual usually attended Defense Language Institute. The AFSC of the individual indicated he was in training. Upon completion he would become a 5 ...


5

A ship's carpenter was responsible for building the hull of the ship, the masts, etc. Any type of carpenter (joiner) would be eligible for membership in a guild (of joiners), but would not be obligated to join. A journeyman means that they are beyond their apprenticeship and are free to work unsupervised and charge their own daily or weekly fees. He may or ...


5

First, Cabinet and Carpet are close enough to have been mis-transcribed on one or more records, so checking images of the originals would be a good idea. Trades or occupations are usually what the man did before enlisting. Private is Edmund Rouse's rank, so he was a common soldier. If his unit saw combat, he was likely involved. You have his regiment, ...


5

The site Convict Records lists 389 different ships that made a total of 720 voyages to Australia carrying convicts. There are many, many possibilities for the ones on which your ancestor (is reputed to have) served. For example there were 20 voyages in 1836 and even 14 in 1843 when the flood of convicts was beginning to be reduced. While the The British ...


5

As already noted, a chemist could have been pretty much anyone preparing or dispensing pharmaceuticals or other preparations. The Royal Pharmaceutical Society has kept a register of chemists, druggists and pharmacists since 1868. They have the registers at their library in London, and can also run a paid-for search for you: http://www.rpharms.com/museum-...


5

According to this unofficial list of US Air Force Job Speciality Codes used during the 1960s and 1970s, no. 29430 corresponds to either: Apprentice Electronic Emission Monitor/Analysis Specialist Apprentice Electronic Intercept Operations/Analysis Specialist


5

When we can't find a person in a collection of historical records, or don't have enough information to know if it is our ancestor or not, it helps to widen the search -- and the same is true for finding material that will give you historical context about your question. If you haven't done so already, write out a short biographical sketch of your ancestor ...


5

In 19th Century Italian documents, I've seen avvocato for lawyer, as well as legista. While legale translates as law, like you I've been unable to find a conclusive answer. However, if not lawyer as we understand the term today, it shows legal knowledge, perhaps one who gives legal counsel and, thus, a person in a higher position in society, as does civile. ...


5

In "The Transport Revolution in Industrializing Britain: A Survey" (pdf) by Dan Bogard at UC Irvine, a table on page 14 gives Stagecoach Fares in shillings per passenger mile, with a value of 0.23 in 1760, which is reasonably close to 1751. On Google Maps, Plymouth to Exeter is around 45 miles by current roads, but that could be somewhat higher using 1750s "...


4

The OED gives the following definitions: viewer, n.   1.     a. A person appointed to examine or inspect something, either on a special occasion or permanently; in later use esp. an inspector or examiner of goods supplied by contract; †spec. in Law, one appointed by a court to inspect a place, property, etc., and report ...


4

Using the same BYU Script Tutorial as your other question, I have come to the conclusion the second image says Häusler, meaning simply "house owner" or "cottager". The same occupation is abbreviated Hslr in the first image. According to this List of Old German Professions: The term for "house owner (with a little land for own use)&...


4

The basic principle in studying family history is always to start what you know and work outwards from there in small increments. If you have a street address from the 1881 Census, or at least a district, the first thing I would do is look into the history of London street re-numbering -- I would not assume that any historical address that I found could be ...


4

Firstly, Phthisis was the old name of tuberculosis, so your suggestion on that is correct. In the 1800s, what we now always call science was more commonly known as natural philosophy. So a scientific instrument and a philosophical instrument would have been the same thing. Such instruments at that time would almost certainly have fallen into one of three ...


4

My personal belief is that the answer depends on time and place - in particular, what local laws and customs applied. In an area and era controlled by trades guilds, there would be very tight controls in place, though I am not sure about exactly when an apprentice who had passed the test of producing his "master piece", would be admitted as a master. I think ...


4

I agree that William Nichol's occupation is listed as Pension. It is difficult to interpret this any more specifically than he was living off a pension income rather than traditional wage. It is a matter of speculation as to the source of the pension, however it is not uncommon to find war pensioners to be listed as such on the 1841 census. Certainly there ...


4

My best guess for the original is the 1901 Census in Lewisham, Class: RG13; Piece: 545; Folio: 107; Page: 10. Here is a clipping from that page: The original text for Henry's occupation is rather obscured, The first word does look like "Folder", but the second does not look like "Worker", rather something ending in "...work". So the transcriber may have ...


3

What records were created? Some clues to what records might have been created can be found by looking at modern-day requirements for starting a business, then researching when that requirement was made into law. Some examples: small businesses are usually required to have a business license, to publish notices to establish their name/DBA (Doing Business As)...


3

On death in 1838 Richard is shown as a Mine Agent. Richard 1750 was born in St Just but in the 1770/1780's he was living in Gulval and having issue. I'm not sure at what age he moved to Helston. The connection to Helston appears to be linked with the marriage of his daughter Elizabeth. She married 1797 and he died 1838. I wonder if collecting tolls for roads ...


3

I emailed the creator of the Turnpike Roads in England website (Alan Rosevear) and he provided what I think to be a very plausible answer because Captain Richard Boyens is already known to have been involved in mining: I think this is an instance where "toller" refers to a collector of tolls other than turnpike tolls - I would guess they are mining ...


3

From the Oxford English Dictionary: Toller: One who takes toll, a toll-collector (now rare); †a tax-gatherer, ‘publican’ (obs.).; toller of the sack, a miller. Alternative: One who tolls a bell (figures! AB) There are other forms but those seem the only two appropriate.


3

In the archives of the Mezzogiorno we find civile used in different manners - as noted here already, at times we find it used more liberally to include the middle class but quite often it in fact denotes a more elevated class. I have controlled records where nobles were listed as "civile" and even more often as "legale" which at times was used to denote ...


2

I can only suggest that you try the possibly lengthy process of looking in the catalogues of the National Records of Scotland (former National Archives of Scotland) and any local archives for Glasgow. I am not optimistic, however. "Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors: The Official Guide", published by the NRS, has a set of paragraphs on apprentices but I saw ...


2

By the nineteenth century, formal apprenticeship was becoming much less common. Compulsory apprenticeship ended in 1844. The 'apprenticeship path' for Matthew Nettell was therefore likely an informal agreement between friends or relatives to learn the trade. Records for informal apprenticeships rarely survive. Parish apprenticeship, typically of poor ...


2

B103 forms are, as you say, used in strange ways that might not be expected from the printed columns. I can't read this example sufficiently well, but other B103s that I have seen have, in effect, two sets of dates. One set refers to the dates of events in the person's career. The other set refers to the date that the information was generated by the Army's ...


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