8

It appears to be: "Bankhead of Turfbeg" Turfbeg is a district to the north-east of the modern town, in roughly the same place as "Bankhead" on this snippet from an 1850 map by James Knox: Bankhead and Turfbeg can be seen in rather better detail in this snippet from the 1861 Ordnance survey map of Forfar:


8

The words after John Larke's name are "Single Man" it's just the top of the a doesn't go all the way over. Compare to "Single Woman" after Elizabeth's name. I would interpret it as meaning he was a bachelor rather than a widower. The "No 2" is I suspect just the number of that entry, but you would need to compare it to the records before and after to be ...


7

Yes! This is probably possible in any image manipulation program, but I have found that the Wolfram Mathematica software is a very powerful tool for this sort of work. A home use licence costs $A295 The trick is first, to line them up correctly by cropping the right number of pixels from each side, using repeated applications of the ImageCrop function. I ...


7

I read Andrievci, Kreis Brod in Slawonien heimatszuständig nach Klattau gl. Bez. in Böhmen The answer to your question lies in "heimatzuständig" or also only "zuständig" (responsible) in other records. The "Heimatrecht" (local citizenship) in a community was acquired either by being born there, marrying in or in later days also by living there for a ...


6

It's crucial that you get hold of the originals (or rather, images of them). I think you realise this by the fact that you say "Normally I would try to look up the original records". But because there can be so much extra information on the originals, it is pointless to proceed without them. Fortunately, the originals are available, though I'm not sure how ...


6

I think the writing in the last column of entry 499 says: A. Pope Offg Min. [Officiating Minister] and that the occupation is: Mariner


6

Baptisms and burials moved to pre-printed books in 1813 as a result of Rose's "Act for better regulating and preserving Parish and other Registers of Births, Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials in England [28th June 1812]" of 1812 Marriages had been pre-printed from 1754, as a result of Hardwicke's "Act for the better preventing of clandestine Marriages. (1753)...


6

If you're willing to put in a little time and effort, it's possible you don't need the indexes. You linked to the Hungary Civil Registration collection here: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1452460 That page contains a very long list of document collections, organized by town or location of origin. As Budapest is large relative to the other ...


5

In the Church of England the term Baptism refers to a ceremony at which an individual makes a conscious decision to accept the ways of the Church and is so accepted by the Church. As an infant cannot make such a decision, the ceremony of Christening represents the acceptance into the Church of the infant and the vows of the Godparents to bring it up in the ...


5

The Digital Archive of Brno (Brünn) has the 1890 census (advance to p. 2) with Konstantin, Leopoldina (or Leopoldine) and a birth date of 1886 März (March) 12. There is a column for Geburtsort, politischer Bezirk, Land that contains Brünn, Mähren (Brno, Moravia). In 1890 the family lived at Schreibwaldstrasse 35, having moved from Schwedengasse 4. Searching ...


4

One of the pitfalls of being self-taught when you're doing genealogy research (as I was when first starting out) is that you can pick up bad habits from using tools like hints which are intended to 'make things easier'. Beginners are shown how to match up people by name, and age and place, and unless you are watching a demonstration specifically about ...


4

This is the image from the source linked in your question: I retweeted your question during a chat today, and Fergus Smith at http://www.oldscottish.com/ kindly gave this answer (you can see from the conversation that Jane N Harris agrees): In C17th St Andrews, Mr implied magister i.e. master's degree rather than bachelor's. Your source confirms this ...


4

My general advice on finding records in a particular area is in this answer: What records are available in a particular locale? My checklist looks like this: Learn what records might have been created in a particular time and place. Research which of those records might still exist, and which records are accessible to the public (not subject to ...


4

Lahady didn't have their own orthodox church, so their parish was in Szchuchin (Shchuchin) - foto of the church here, and you need records of the church in Shchuchin. Records of this parish are in different archives. In Lithuanian National Archive - only baptisms of 1889 year. You can look through them here In National Belarussian Archive in Minsk - years ...


4

Let's assume for the moment that all of the records you need will be found in Cantley (a perilous assumption, but we'll start with Cantley before we work outwards to neighboring parishes). Let's assume also that you began with a global search at FamilySearch.org, where you collected the information that you found about your subject families. This is the ...


4

Ancestry.co.uk Many original parish records for Bexley, Bexleyheath and Sidcup can be viewed on Ancestry.co.uk. See: Bexley, Kent, England, Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1558-1812 Bexley, Kent, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1925 Bexley, Kent, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1935 Bexley, Kent, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1985 Bexley, Kent, ...


4

I have no previous experience in this but I think it may be related to the Burial in Woollen Acts: The first Act was passed in 1666 (18 & 19 Cha. II c. 4 1666), and the second, and rather more famous, in 1678 repealing the first (30 Car. II cap.3). Its aims were "for the lessening the importation of linen from beyond the seas, and the ...


4

My guess would be that the sacraments listed in the death register might be those which are associated with someone's death. Any marriage which took place would be in a separate register -- baptisms and births, marriages and deaths all have their own registers. See The Three R's of Researching Roman Catholic Church Records by Lisa Alzo | May 14, 2013 from ...


4

The primary purpose of the OPRs was to record baptisms, marriages and (if you are really, really lucky) burials carried out by a Church of Scotland minister in that parish. While there seems to have been some sort of intention that all births / baptisms and marriages should be recorded, in all my families (I'm 1/8 Scottish descent) I've only ever seen this ...


3

I struggled with this for some time, and managed to use both without any kind of consistency so that some people in my database had Baptism events and others had Christening events, but in the end I decided that I would just standardise on Baptism and went through fixing up my database to use that for everybody. I can't remember exactly how I decided which ...


3

Family Search Research Wiki: Church of England Parish Registers says: Baptisms (christenings), marriages, and burials These events were recorded on blank pages in a bound register. The events of baptism, marriage, and burial were all recorded in one volume until 1754, when a law required that marriages be recorded in a separate book. Banns, or ...


3

When making the copy originally, use a black background rather than the white copier cover. This reduces the contrast on the opposite side and therefore the bleed through.


3

The Kent History and Library Centre serves a the county archive, but it does not cover all of the historical county. For counties adjacent to London and where county boundaries have changed over time, records may be found in either side of the original border. Medway, Bromley, Greenwich, Bexley and Lewisham have thier own archives. The North West Kent ...


3

The September 2015 issue of the Society of Genealogists' Magazine (p420) notes missing burials in Sussex, in the early 1800s. The problem originated from the Priest completing the register once a year from the parish clerk's account book. The problem was that no entry was made into the account book if the fee had been paid in full already. The account book ...


3

From what I have seen in baptism/marriage/death entries Jos. is a common abbreviation of Joseph. John (Johann, in Latin Joannes/Ioannes) would have been abbreviated as Joan., Joa. or Joh. See e.g. that entry, first line, last column: coop. Joa. Ant. Mogetini p. t. meaning interim chaplain John Anthony [Joannes Antonius] Mogetini.


3

Is there a column heading or is this in a page margin? Typically printed baptismal records had extra columns for confirmations, and for comments. I've also seen vaccination records, emigration notes, parish transfers, death dates, etc. in the comments fields. (Marriage and burial records can also include a number of interesting details in the comments column)...


2

I don't have a definitive answer and can just refer to my experience. I have seen this often in parish registers when referring to how something is said, spoken or generally known e.g. like house names. In a wider sense it may be also used to refer to something which is known by reference. In your example we see a reference to another (legal) document. Such ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible