11

I have a similar case in the 1930 Census. I have city directory listings showing where my focus family might be, but I cannot find a 1930 Census record. Ancestry.com suggests a match to me where the parents in the household have similar names and ages as my focus family. In my case, the hinted-at family lives on the other side of the state from where I ...


8

I am not so familiar with US records – all my research is in the British Isles and Australia – but my own decision processes would lead me to conclude with some level of confidence (but not certainty) that this record is not for your target family. I don’t think I can add much to Jan’s excellent answer, but here are some of the criteria I would use to ...


6

On the main search page on Ancestry there is a search box called "Keyword" if you use that to search for "Frankford Supply" you will find several references to newspaper want ads mentioning Frankford Supply in Bristol, PA. You can also search Newspapers.com. One of the articles I found there is this one from The Bristol Daily Courier (Bristol, Pennsylvania) ...


5

The sounds [polɑvt͡ʃɛk] would be written Polavcsek in modern Hungarian; [pɑlovt͡ʃɛk] would be Palovcsek. However, surnames often preserve archaic spellings, and in any case nobody paid much attention to exact spellings of names before the 20th century. (In a world where illiteracy was normal, it was only the sound of a surname that mattered.) Focusing on ...


5

The Pennsylvania Archive Series can be located in multiple places and it is sometimes called different things. I found it pretty quickly in the following two places. Ancestry.com has it online for its paid members as the Pennsylvania Archive Series 1664-1902. I also found it in one of my favorite places to sometimes monitor for historical items I do not ...


5

It is always advisable to record what the record actually says with Quaker dates because of the various variables in trying to calculate it to the Gregorian calendar of today. Which leads me to part of your question, in 1716 it was still the Julian calendar. In my genealogy program I put Quaker dates as 1716 11m 4d 1716. If your genealogy software doesn't ...


5

First, Sarah Penrod is indicated as living in 1807 by the property description saying that adjacent to the west of the property being deeded is "the messuage, land of plantation whereon Mrs. Sarah Penrod now lives and occupies". There is nothing indicating when Sarah Penrod's death may have taken place. The last paragraph, made in 1812, has nothing to do ...


5

The horse was likely stolen, as there had been an increase in horse theft during the Revolutionary War. Horses would be stolen in one locality and sold in another area (another county or state) to prevent capture. An interesting account of the horse thievery of the Nugent Gang, The Valley Scourge, is posted on the Franklin County, Pennsylvania website. On ...


4

Like published histories and Ancestry Public trees, DAR/SAR databases are compiled sources. They may be useful as guides, but the question I always have is what primary sources did the compilers draw from when that entry was created? If you have not already done so, I recommend that you write out a biographical sketch and timeline for Vestus and his family, ...


4

This time period is outside my area of study, so I don't have many practical suggestions to find records for the 1790s, but perhaps this will help you get started. The basic principles are to start from the known, to work outward from that to the unknown, and to make as complete a picture as you can, so that with each new historical record you find, you ...


4

Take a look at the answers to How to find wife's maiden name in New England in the 1700s? -- my answer has general tips on finding records about women, and some of the other answers about finding female ancestors, or looking for the people's parents, may give you ideas about other record types to look for. The FamilySearch Research wiki on Pennsylvania has ...


4

... divided between my children viz Martha Entermarried with Henry Rhinehart, My Son John, Elizabeth Entermarried with William Stevenson, Henry B. Fought, Isaac S. Fought, William E. Fought, Jonathan E. Fought, Mary Jane Fought share and share alike ... and as my son John is now dead and has left a daughter Ann Virginia Fought his share to go to ...


4

First of all, everything @Hammy said - it's all good advice. Bear in mind that children don't have first-hand knowledge of their parents' precise birthplaces (I thought for years that my mother was born in the town she grew up in, and only learned differently when I started doing genealogy). In any case, if he was born in Pennsylvania, his birth certificate ...


4

This looked like a tricky search as I don't have worldwide access on Ancestry, just UK. But a search for Leonie Casimir/Degueldre brings up a marriage record for Leonie Casimir and Jean-Baptiste Degueldre in Namur, and also a 1900 US census record for Leonie and Louis Staquet. I assume these are the records you're referring to, but I can't actually read them....


4

Have you seen Brief History of St. John Chrysostom Albanian Orthodox Church & SS. Peter and Paul Church, Uniondale PA? Dedicated church cemeteries seem to have been the norm, but they also used sections within larger non-denominational cemeteries. Which congregation an immigrant joined often depended on what was convenient for worship. Slight ...


4

Read the helpful overview "How to Find Pennsylvania Birth Records" (FamilySearch Wiki), especially Births_After_1905 The wiki page does need to be updated: as of 2017, birth records are available from 1906 to 1911. And the PHMC (Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission) link to the Birth Indices has changed several times since the records went online....


4

As someone who lives a few miles from Coleraine, to me the town of Coleraine is where he was born. Simple as that. The 1831 census of Coleraine parish has 7 Stewart families in the town a mix of Presbyterian and Church of Ireland. Heads of household were Fanny, James, Alexander, Susan, Joseph, Andrew & John. The Church of Ireland parish records start in ...


3

For Document 2, you say: The second ... is from: Orphans Court Proceedings, 1752-1857; Index; Author: Pennsylvania. Orphans' Court (Berks County); Probate Place: Berks, Pennsylvania and Document 2 From 1821 referencing page 483. Michael listed as "Children Guardian" Catherine and Joseph as "Guardian Appointed". The index appears to say Volume 7 ...


3

This is not an extensive list of Quaker resources, but here are some links to guides and repositories to help you get started. For Philadelphia records: a digital copy of Jack Eckert's Guide to the records of Philadelphia yearly meeting is available to view in the Family History Library's online book collection Covers eastern Pennsylvania, western New ...


3

You're probably aware already that Pennsylvania's land records are defined and issued by the Commonwealth and not by the Federal Government. This is kind of obvious, since the Federal Government didn't exist in the time period your warrant comes from, but I want to mention it for the benefit of others who might be familiar with the later warrants issued by ...


3

I think it is important to remember that most of the historical records we use for genealogy today were created for other purposes (not for genealogy). To find records, we have to understand why and how they were created. For civil records, that often means that some law was passed mandating that the records should be collected; those laws will say what ...


3

I appreciate the lead from PolyGeo which led me down the path I needed to go down and this is what I found. PA Archives: There are three sets of passenger lists: The "A" lists are the Captains' Lists of passengers being imported; "B" lists are Oaths of Allegiance to the King; and "C" lists are Oaths of Abjuration from the Pope. An individual being ...


3

The Pittsburgh Post Gazette did a write up about the incident awhile back: Lillian Thomas: The tiny town that fought the Klan, April 11, 2004. I would suggest perhaps - unless you contact the Klan itself for a membership roster - contact PSP for an old police incident report. You may also search through Cambria County court records. The resistance at Lilly ...


3

Instead of looking at the search method you want to use, let's look at the characteristics of the single database or search portal that you are looking for: extensive coverage of New York and Pennsylvania vital statistics for all counties full birth dates with birth location for all entries birthdate range before 1860 It doesn't exist (yet). Early vital ...


3

That's a tough one for sure- I don't see them in the 1940 census. I would start by looking more into the Benjamin L. Earnest that was born 14 Jan 1911 in Portage, Blair, PA, and died 8 January 1977 in Butler, PA. Him and your grandfather both seem to be in Butler in the 1950s according to military and directory records on Ancestry. If you know someone with ...


3

As Jan mentioned, it would be useful to know where you've already looked.... For Pennsylvania marriage records of this period, the first best place to look is FamilySearch's "Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950" https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1589502?collectionNameFilter=false This collection is microfilm images of the docket books, not ...


3

Google --- "nevada avenue" mckeesport --- and one of the top matches is 1955-vintage map - Tube City Online. On the 1955 map, Nevada Avenue ran between Elm St and Weber St, not far from S Duquesne Ave and 5th Ave. By comparing this map and McKeesport on GoogleMaps, Elm Ave has been extended and modified and now overlays what was Nevada Avenue. By the way, ...


3

In a different context, one of our community members cautioned against premature connectivitis syndrome (PCS) when connecting up people, and I think the advice to "think INCHWORM (rather than leapfrog)" is equally valuable here, when you are thinking about a place name. Your question suggests you already know that civil parishes and Catholic ...


2

Q1 - Since Germans continued to immigrate to Pennsylvania, there were always fresh German-speakers to add more German-language records (especially church records), and to keep the language alive for the US-born descendants of German immigrants through social contacts. This continued through the 20th century. There was a particular break during World War I, ...


2

Taking in a run-away orphan would probably be illegal, akin to aiding a fugitive or even kidnapping. One would be obliged to turn the child over to authorities. The Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776 established an Orphans' Court for each county to deal with guardianship. You'll have to do some homework to find out what orphan homes existed at that time and ...


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