11

Based on the following the photo is by H. Richers who operated from at least 1878 to 1913 in Hannover (the link has his street address). Looking at the ears, chin, eye sockets, nose and mouth features I would say it is the same person and both photos look like they may have even been taken the same day in a single sitting with slight change of styling of ...


10

Folk costumes - Volkstrachten - are traditional clothing that can be highly specific to a region or even a village. The woman in your photo is wearing parts of the Oesterten-Tracht or Lindhorster_Tracht, which was characteristic of eastern Schaumburg-Lippe. It consists of a characteristic red skirt with colored ribbon trim ("Want"), apron, sleeveless vest ...


10

I have a box of photos from different families and still bother sorting them and identifying the people displayed. You named plenty good ideas whom to contact to help you. Focus on group photos if available, also those which exist elsewhere. Especially wedding photos are somewhat “standardized”, people are arranged according to their relationship and status. ...


10

The "B" page of "Find your boxing ancestors" on boxinghistory.org.uk lists several Butlers but only three with the first initial "G" (as his shorts appear to be monogrammed "GB"). The first of these, George Butler from Blidworth, Nottinghamshire, can be found on a "Local Sporting Legends" page on the Blidworth Historical Society site. There's a photo on ...


7

This was fun and here is my current theory, which I believe supports your hypothesis. The style of clothes are 1860s style per the vintage style guides listed further below and in the 1870s styles seemed to have moved significantly away from the style pictured. In particular away from the particulars of his frock coat, colors worn, as well as more patterns ...


7

Colin's suggestion to seek newspaper photos is a good one. Jan Murphy's statement about online microfilmed papers being less than clear is also valid. However, many of those news photographs are filed away by newspapers as a hedge against future needs. Those real, clear, sharp photographs or negatives may still exist in the newspaper's files. I would ...


7

I had a quick look for the tricycle. I found a few similar ones on ebay and such, without any firm date information. The most useful example appears to be this auction for an "Antique Vintage Wooden Kiddie Kart Child's Bike trike Riding Toy Tricycle", which states: Age: Quite Old - Maybe 60-80 years old??? Marked: Kiddie-Kar (Kart) The age range isn'...


7

The uniform is from the time around World War I (see, for instance, World War 1 Uniforms and US Enlisted Uniforms 1900 - 1918: Part 2: Uniform Patterns (Enlisted) Army). The uniform style doesn't indicate the branch of the U.S. Army. The button is called a "collar disc", and the "48" is a unit number, either a regiment or battalion depending on how the ...


6

Well, building off of Robert Shaw's answer, it appears to me that the person in the photograph is wearing a Type I unit disk, which puts the photo somewhere between 1910 and 1937. According to both the link in Robert's answer and this document - https://history.army.mil/html/museums/uniforms/survey_uwa.pdf - the regimental number (48 in this case) was ...


6

I was thinking perhaps the second initial was a "T", so I did a quick search of the South Australian BDM index (run by GenealogySA) and found a P. T. (Patrick Thomas) Bennett, who seemed about the right 'vintage" for the photo: Given Name(s): Patrick Thomas Last Name: BENNETT Birth Date: 1890, July 17 Gender: M Father: William Patrick BENNETT Mother: ...


6

On the main search page on Ancestry there is a search box called "Keyword" if you use that to search for "Frankford Supply" you will find several references to newspaper want ads mentioning Frankford Supply in Bristol, PA. You can also search Newspapers.com. One of the articles I found there is this one from The Bristol Daily Courier (Bristol, Pennsylvania) ...


5

An innovative idea you could try would be to use a tool such as Google Picasa, which can use facial recognition to organize photos. See the information and video about this in the Lifehacker article: Picasa 3.5 Organizes Your Photos with Facial Recognition. If you tag the people who you positively know, then Picasa will learn from it and may give you ...


5

A couple of other places to consider looking: Local newspapers to where your ancestors lived to see if there are any other photos of them that you can compare to. Search on the internet using the photo comparison sites such as TinEye to see if anyone else has put the photo online.


5

Jo B. Paoletti, Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, is the author of Pink and Blue: Telling the Boys from the Girls in America, recently published by Indiana University Press. She discusses the transition from dresses to more gendered clothing throughout the entire book, but for the time period you are looking at, I ...


5

Think whether you may know an artist in your family. Someone who does portraits. If you have such a relative, or even a friend, they have an "eye" that others don't and may help in dating the photos or picking out the same people at different ages. This is human facial recognition. Think about who you know in the family who may resemble the subjects. Get ...


5

Facial recognition software is improving all the time so, yes, we could teach it to help your search. If you want a package that will tick away and compare pictures, looking for matches with a set of photographs, there are several on the market. None of them cheap. You can find them with your favourite search engine. If you want something to try a quick ...


5

George B. Sperry apparently owned the studio where the picture was taken. However, this could have been any one of several studios in Toledo. According to Ohio Photographers: 1839-1900 by Diane VanSkiver Gagel, George B. Sperry owned several studios in Toledo: When he came to Toledo, he was associated with the Fillmore studio on Summit Street, and ...


5

Looks like this is on Broadway on the W 42nd St block. Changed a lot since this photo taken but on Google Streetview you can see the old building (now Knickerbocker Hotel) on the right is still standing, quite distinctive brickwork. Source: Google Streetview Found this by checking an old Manhattan directory for Broadway Bookshop and Florsheim - the ...


4

The car seems most likely to be an early-1940s model Chevy or Plymouth Coupe. The third picture is not the same car; it's a 1920s sedan style. The man's shoes are two-tone style that might be a Spectator shoe which apparently had a long fashion run so may not be too helpful.


4

I have tried to remove as much of the paper color as possible, as a means of highlighting what was written: My best interpretation is "J. H. Gold":


4

The present picture is hardly crisp, but we can compare the two car photos at similar scales: There are certainly some consistencies between the two cars, notably the shade/flap above the windscreen, the wheels and arches, and possibly the door hinges. Nothing absolutely conclusive, but they look pretty similar to me, and could be the same car. I can't ...


4

This appears to be a Ford Model T Coupe, produced from 1917-1927 Looking through some various model year images here, seems to narrow it to 1923-25 by location of the hinges and how the door swings. Before 1923 the door hinges appear to be located on the other side of the door, with the handle near the window edge. The 1924 model seems to show the raised ...


4

One place to start might be the US Army Center of Military History. Their page of Frequently Asked Questions contains many tips about how to research your relatives' service. The answer to these questions might also yield clues which would be useful to you: How can I obtain copies of my, or my relative's, U.S. Army personnel records? Where can I find a ...


4

The tight hair and tight button-down clothing make me think pre-1890. There was a rage of puffy shoulders and sleeves that began around 1895 and became outlandish by 1905. Subject appears to be between 65 and 80. Her crooked smile may indicate some worn or missing teeth. :) Probably a widow, since she is aged and posing alone. She may be holding the ...


4

This might be tricky. For starters, it looks like the club is no longer extant. Local club Farnsfield's homepage reports their "recent acquisition of the Edingley Cricket Pitch". The Edingley club itself was at edingleycc.com, but that site is no longer active. The Internet Archive did manage to scoop up the site, though. Their "About Us" page has the dates ...


4

The skirt length alone rules out 1912. It is consistent with 1942. As are the other clothes. Remember that people usually did not wear the latest fashions, especially away from large cities and if they were not wealthy. They often wore the same well-kept clothes for many years, updating as needed.


4

Although I guess that no one will be able to determine a precise year with just the picture given, however, I try my best guess that it was taken between 1883 and 1888. Let me walk you through the process of my estimation. a) Overall look He looks like a men in his 50s. A beard usually makes a person appear older, especially when as large as the one in ...


4

Wristwatches enjoyed a significant increase in popularity during the First World War. Their convenience over pocket watches was a driver for this. I have inherited my grandmother's wristwatch, which is of a very similar style to the one in the picture. The thick curved bezel is distinctive. The watch is hallmarked 1920. I would date your picture to ...


4

The gun looks like a shotgun rather than a rifle. It could be a model 97 (1897) Winchester shotgun. And, that is a Model T Ford. The model T began production in 1909. So, the photo can't be older than that. The production of the model T peaked in the 1920s, so that seems likely, although they were popular for decades. It's possible a model T expert could ...


4

That jacket is very much like this stable jacket in the British National Army Museum described here and the stable jacket of the Fife and Forfar Imperial Yeomanry shown here. It says in the description of the jacket that it "was often donned by cavalry officers during service overseas". Maybe that is why it appears in a portrait in Texas?


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