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10

The technique you are looking for is off-camera flash. This means a separate flash unit that you can trigger remotely (usually wirelessly, nowadays). By directing the light across the stone at an angle, even shallow inscriptions are highlighted. The results are amazing. I see and read details that I couldn't see standing there in person. The improvement is ...


10

I have a box of photos from different families and still bother sorting them and identifying the people displayed. You named plenty good ideas whom to contact to help you. Focus on group photos if available, also those which exist elsewhere. Especially wedding photos are somewhat “standardized”, people are arranged according to their relationship and status. ...


7

Colin's suggestion to seek newspaper photos is a good one. Jan Murphy's statement about online microfilmed papers being less than clear is also valid. However, many of those news photographs are filed away by newspapers as a hedge against future needs. Those real, clear, sharp photographs or negatives may still exist in the newspaper's files. I would ...


5

Calico Pie's Family Historian software allows the user to add photos and link faces in the photos to their entries in FH. The feature list says: In Family Historian, not only can you add as many pictures as you like for each person, you can add a picture once and link it to each person in the picture. The best family photographs are usually the ones ...


5

A couple of other places to consider looking: Local newspapers to where your ancestors lived to see if there are any other photos of them that you can compare to. Search on the internet using the photo comparison sites such as TinEye to see if anyone else has put the photo online.


5

An innovative idea you could try would be to use a tool such as Google Picasa, which can use facial recognition to organize photos. See the information and video about this in the Lifehacker article: Picasa 3.5 Organizes Your Photos with Facial Recognition. If you tag the people who you positively know, then Picasa will learn from it and may give you ...


5

Think whether you may know an artist in your family. Someone who does portraits. If you have such a relative, or even a friend, they have an "eye" that others don't and may help in dating the photos or picking out the same people at different ages. This is human facial recognition. Think about who you know in the family who may resemble the subjects. Get ...


5

PhotoIdent, a product from Germany, has the requested features. As it features a English website, I assume there is an English language version of the software too. I haven't tried it personally.


4

I have tried to remove as much of the paper color as possible, as a means of highlighting what was written: My best interpretation is "J. H. Gold":


4

This appears to be a Ford Model T Coupe, produced from 1917-1927 Looking through some various model year images here, seems to narrow it to 1923-25 by location of the hinges and how the door swings. Before 1923 the door hinges appear to be located on the other side of the door, with the handle near the window edge. The 1924 model seems to show the raised ...


4

Have you taken a look at Flickr.com? You can start groups, but also, you could just set up an account, and organize into albums... and download the entire album. You can also change your privacy and share your pictures with just friends.


4

You can do what you want in any of the major photo editing programmes such as Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Gimp etc. The thing to do is to increase the canvas size so that you have a large white area below the photo. Print it out and write the names in the appropriate people in it when you visit a relative and then when you get home use the same programme ...


3

You are correct that there is nothing on the photo itself that tells you the source of the photo itself, and it only says that you are the submitter. (I agree that is weird and MyHeritage should change that). But what you can do is go to the person for whom that photo was added. You should find at the bottom right of the person's profile page that ...


3

I would have thought a Blog would be ideal for this. Something like Wordpress with each photo on its own post and only allow comments from family members (Wordpress login required). Store all the images in a Gallery and a custom members only page for download of the images and comments. You could also still have a public access page as required.


3

My best luck so far has been from distant cousins. A 3rd cousin recently inherited several boxes of unidentified photos from her mother, so I volunteered to scan them and show them around at a reunion this past summer. We were able to identify about half of them. Then I put the remaining unknown photos on a website, and sent links to other family researchers ...


3

Let's look at this a little sideways: What resources would include historic photos of particular people or events or things? newspapers, magazines and other periodicals yearbooks and directories historic postcards photo archives, public (like NARA) or private professional photographers & media companies that have stock photos (usually purchased from ...


3

What about RAOGK (Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness)? Their website is under redevelopment at the moment RAOGK link. There is also a Facebook group at Facebook Group link. This type of thing is what these groups were set up for. I have had some success with them in the past.


3

A lot depends on what your "unknown stuff" is, what emulsion was used to create the photograph, and the substrate. I beg of you to consider that, with your deep level of inexperience, and if there is no well-preserved negative on file, that gone is gone. Consider at least getting an estimate from someone with an education in the field. American Institute ...


3

As you say you are using Gramps, you can install the photo tagging gramplet. You can just use this manually or if you have OpenCV installed it will automatically find faces. I’ve used it and found it to be quite good.


3

I have a lot of those. I assume that "printing photos on postcard stock" was a fairly common thing back in the 1900-1930 time frame. this seems like a relevant link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_photo_postcard


3

Family Historian will handle same sex relationships without problems. It also has a variation on what you want with photos. If you upload a photo with multiple people in it you can draw a box around one person and just link that box to an individual in your tree and just that box is shown when you do a report on that person but you can also include the full ...


3

Family details: The marriage register entry can be found on Ancestry (registration required, paid subscription). As you already know she married the tailor Willi Max Karl Babbel (the third name was first incorrectly written Robert in the entry) on 1913-05-22 at the register office XI (Gartenplatz 4/5). Both were of Lutheran denomination. She was working as ...


2

Another option that hasn't been mentioned here is to use "buddy files". This low-tech solution has advantages because the text is clear and editable, it is searchable, and it will not get wiped by some photo-editing s/w like the Exif/XMP meta-data. It is also possible to add keywords or search terms of your own choosing, and even full transcriptions. A "...


2

The only service I am aware of is The War Graves Photographic Project (TWGPP). They state: The original aim of The War Graves Photographic Project was to photograph every war grave, individual memorial, Ministry of Defence grave, and family memorial of serving military personnel from WWI to the present day. However, due to its popularity we have now ...


2

This probably won't be too helpful - but there are pictures of a few swimming pools in kansas. http://www.kansasmemory.org/locate.php?categories=567&query=swimming+pools&restrict=all possibly they might be able to point you in the right direction.


2

I shared the question during the Twitter Chat #AncestryHour and received some suggestions, although some may not be useful on a white or pale stone: ScottishIndexes has had some success using tinfoil: see this post on their Facebook page blogger Liz Loveland of Adventures in Genealogy cautioned against using flour to make the inscription more visible, and ...


2

Here's the only photographer I found with initials J. H. Name: James H Schwartz Residence Year: 1887 Street address: ws Broad Residence Place: Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, USA Occupation: Photographer Publication Title: Kansas City, Missouri, City Directory, 1887


2

I have a similar situation, and found it best to try multiple venues. Since the main purpose is to share photos with the family and get comments, I would suggest first forming a family history group on Facebook. Much of the family is probably already there. I have started four such groups in recent years: one secret group spans four generations, two closed ...


2

You use an archival-quality binder for the same reason you'd use other archival-quality materials. You don't want low-quality materials to outgas or to leach acid or other unwanted byproducts into the box that is holding the materials you want to archive. The standard for storing and displaying photographic materials is the Photographic Activity Test (...


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