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9

I am not an expert on Macedonian place names or history but from Macedonian Village Names THE NAMES OF 804 MACEDONIAN VILLAGES IN AEGEAN MACEDONIA, occupied by Greece in 1912, that have forcedly been changed from 1926 and forward. Submitted by Lena Jankovski and Alex Bakratcheff I wonder whether it may be: MACEDONIAN NAME (District) Greek ...


9

I think it is Новоград-Волинський, which is transliterated as Novohrad-Volyns'kyi, Novograd-Volinskiy, etc. and is also known as Zhvil, Zvil, etc. This is in the Zhytomyr Oblast in northern Ukraine. If this is the correct location, unfortunately there are probably no relatives left. I searched on Fold3 for "Swel, Russia" and found two men in the WWII "Old ...


7

If you consult the enumerators schedule associated with this piece, you will find a description of the area covered. In this case, the piece includes (I may have made transcription errors): All that part of the Parish of Saint Mary on the Hill extending from the Hare & Hounds Public House to the West End of the Bottoms Lane comprising all the ...


6

Not sure about the town, but the locality is "pow. Kamień Koszyrski" - powiat Kamień Koszyrski. Here's the list of "powiaty" (counties) in 2nd Polish Republic (1918-1939) : https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podzia%C5%82_administracyjny_II_Rzeczypospolitej#Wojew%C3%B3dztwo_poleskie Current name of the county town is (English spelling) Kamin'-Kashyrs'kyi (Ukr. ...


5

I would transcribe the examples given as: Chashevoty, Podolsci gub. Podolsk, Russia Chesovoto, Russia Chaszczewod, Podoler gub. Chashvato, Podolski, Russia The second part of this place name is most straightforward. Gub. is an abbreviation of guberniya, or governorate, the major administrative subdivision of the Russian Empire. On this list of governorates ...


5

I read Woitimberge or Wertimberge here. Both are not place names. I guess the census taker did not understand the place name correctly and spelling the place name might also be influenced from local dialect. European place names are listed in the GOV (Geschichtliches Orts-Verzeichnis). You can search it using the wildcard character * (but you have to start ...


5

Which county? I would suggest that deciding to align to what 'typical genealogists' do is not a good idea if it works counter to (a) your software or (b) your immediate intended audience. (Emphasis on 'immediate' audience as our total intended audience should surely be anyone and everyone - however, surely we should prioritise?). If your software allows ...


5

The answer could be Jatołtowicze. From Google maps it looks to be a very small village.


5

I guess the answer to this depends on the location (country), but you gave Norway as an example here. In Norway there is actually a register dedicated to the spelling of location names: "Sentralt Stedsnavnregister" ("Centralized Placename Register"). This register is maintained by The Norwegian Mapping Authority and contains 950 000 placenames with a total ...


4

It was likely Velikaya Kosnitsa. It had sizeable Jewish population in the beginning of XX century: http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/GEO_town.asp?id=313 Here is some additional info about it (Russian language only):http://jukraine.org/vinnickaya-oblast/velikaya_kosnica/


4

The ending of the word seems to be clearer than the beginning. Picking up on the 'cz' as a clue that this might be a Polish name, I tried the Online Gazetteer at JewishGen.org. The FamilySearch Research wiki's article on Poland Gazetteers says: The biggest advantage of this search is that it uses a specialized soundex system to find places. This can ...


4

I just came across this, as the 70th anniversary of Dixie Kiefer's death is approaching this year. I am a reporter at the Poughkeepsie Journal who is preparing a story about the crash. I also have copies of the Nov. 12, 1945 editions of our newspaper, which recount in detail the crash and search. And today, I hiked to the crash site, where wreckage of the ...


4

(Yes I know it is an old question...) It can be helpful to understand how spelling has changed over time, to know what to search for. In the example from Norway we have Spilleren in Meløy. Meløy has the modern spelling of the word island, "øy". In the old Danish spelling used in Norway during the union (up to 1814, and beyond) it would be Melø. (As in the ...


4

To answer this question, I have to ask another one: how can we define "most genealogists"? Another thing to consider is how you are going to make use of the place data when you see it in your family history software. Finding Materials in Library Catalogs I did a place search for England in the Family History Library's catalog. For "Places within ...


4

The first letter looks like a 'C' and is not very different from the C in Chicago on line 7 or in Cleveland on line 11 (both in column of final destination). The second letter puzzled me first but then, although I don't speak polish, I recalled that the combination 'CZ' is not uncommon in polish, so I go for 'z'. Third and fourth letters looks like 'eu' or '...


4

I took a look at towns in The Geographical Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic Countries There are no towns with names similar to Dolowicz or Dołowicz in the second volume but if one looks for Dobrowicze on finds on page 78 of volume II, two entries, both in the powiat (county) of Wilejka which was in the Russian partition. Wilejka was in ...


4

I have not come across the term before but found this in the Derbyshire Courier November 15, 1851: It sounds like an event rather than a place. In many other references to Mansfield Statutes (and other statutes like Bolsover Statutes) that I found there were often mentions of servants being hired so that seems to have been something of a focus for it/them. ...


4

I took a look at the Słownik geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego i innych krajów słowiańskich (Geographic Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland and Other Slavic Countries) to see if I could find a town with a similar name. In the area of Grodno there is the town Michnowce: The image below shows it relative to Grodno: The images above are from kresy, which is a ...


4

There are policies on this subject in some areas related to genealogy. The General Register Office have rules for UK civil registration that require all registrations to show place names (and counties) as they are at the time the event is registered, not as they may have been historically (even if that would have been correct at the time) So as an example, ...


4

A potential answer from communication with the volunteer for this parish at Cornwall Online Parish Clerks: 'Barah' is likely a small farm adjacent to Headon Barrow in Jacobstow parish. The barrow itself is a prehistoric burial ground, which are quite common in Cornwall, but according to the 'online parish clerk', barrow would have been pronounced and heard ...


4

Your last paragraph about records just about answered your own question. As you say, county records and records with street addresses give you the county. Therefore, if you only have records that give you the town name for a person, then check the county records for each possible county for that person, or look in other records for a street address for ...


4

This is a spelling variation, similar to that encountered at What does Orring County North Carolina mean in Quaker records? You have already found a wealth of evidence that the Rygate, Surry and Reigate, Surrey are the same place (by locating identically or very similarly named features in both places.). However, finding Rygate or a similar variant spelling ...


3

The Geographical Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic Countries (Słownik geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego i innych krajów słowiańskich) has two entries for Jatołtowicze which give the following information about Jatołtowicze: It was a manor and peasant village; It was in the Powiat of Oszmianski; There were 86 Catholics and a Catholic Chapel ...


3

As others have pointed out there is no definitive set of rules. I have always used the comma separators in my data. I teach courses on family history research and on the use of several programs and have beta testing Family Search and several genealogy programs. I have authored the on-line book "Genealogists' Guide to North America" at www.genealogy....


3

Having commented, I probably should put my money where my mouth is and describe my solution - unfortunately for general applicability, as a UK based genealogist, I have only noticed one such place in my data, which is New York City. That's not to say that there aren't others that I haven't noticed. But for the sake of completeness.... While my normal format ...


3

OK, this is too long for a comment, but isn't yet an answer. More documenting a search. The Father-in-Law, Julien Paudois, actually lived (and died) in Lacordaire, Saskatchewan. His grave is on Find a Grave, and his probate records are in the Saskatchewan Probate Estate Files, 1887-1931 collection of Familysearch. (His middle-name was Pierre.) This ...


3

Mishaf is an anglicization of Michov (they are identical when said with the applicable accent), which is the Yiddish name for the town of Michów, about 75mi SE of Warsaw. When he was born, it was in the Russian Empire, and when he naturalized, it was Poland (and is Poland today)


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