8

Don't throw out funeral books! They are an important record of other family members, friends, associates, and neighbors -- what Elizabeth Shown Mills has called the family's FAN Club. Studying my neighbors' and godparents' families gave me important clues that allowed me to learn more about where my family had lived before I was born. I didn't realize ...


5

I'm glad to see this question, because I also have a family Bible that needs to be protected. This is the information I've found so far while researching how to protect our own Bible (I'm not an expert). Cedar products are marketed to us to help guard against the intrusion of pests, but that doesn't mean the cedar is good for long-term storage of the ...


4

My G-Grandmother passed away in 1959. Last year, I tried reaching out to some distant cousins via postal mail and received no reply. This year, I tried reaching out again, also including a copy of the page that their Father, Aunt, and Uncle signed from my G-Grandmother's funeral guest book. I heard back right away and have established a nice relationship ...


3

A lot depends on what your "unknown stuff" is, what emulsion was used to create the photograph, and the substrate. I beg of you to consider that, with your deep level of inexperience, and if there is no well-preserved negative on file, that gone is gone. Consider at least getting an estimate from someone with an education in the field. American Institute ...


2

You use an archival-quality binder for the same reason you'd use other archival-quality materials. You don't want low-quality materials to outgas or to leach acid or other unwanted byproducts into the box that is holding the materials you want to archive. The standard for storing and displaying photographic materials is the Photographic Activity Test (...


2

My daughter pointed out a genuine historical use for saving guest books: She noted that the signatures of one relative at my parent's 50th wedding anniversary guest book, and the same relative's signature on my father's funeral guest book, almost looks like two different people. In that case the signature indicates a later drug addiction. In other cases ...


2

I think one of your best bets is to save it as a PDF or another very common file format, and then both upload it to a cloud provider and send copies of it to a couple of relatives who seem interested. Having multiple relatives with copies will help it survive the longest. (You can only be responsible for preserving it during your lifetime; after that, your ...


2

It is difficult to both preserve old documents or photos and also handle them a lot. My suggestion would be to: Scan all the pages (or photograph if it is not possible to place flat on a scanner) Store the originals in a cool, dry, and secure place Print out copies of the scans if you want to flip through or share them A minimal ammount of handling will ...


2

Most large universities and colleges have these sorts of scanners available for use for a nominal fee per scan, or potentially for free, especially if you are an affiliate of the school (i.e. if you have any children or cousins in college, use them to get access for free). For instance, Dartmouth College lists the following for scanning options: https://www....


2

Once you have the weeds out of the way, you can often take a legible photo of a stone that appears too worn to read using off-camera flash. See this question and answer including some before and after photos. You might also get such a photo using lucky sun position or the mirror method, but off-camera flash gives you much more control, and you don't have ...


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