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13

I battled with how to approach this when I first set out on my DNA testing 'saga' about two years ago and have learned a few things over now 60 plus completed kits that I manage across multiple family lines over the last 2 years. 1) Form letters = Failure; I cannot emphasize this enough. Just like I don't like getting them, people are irritated by them and ...


12

Unless you find a living cousin who shares your interest in family history, and in DNA tracing, your efforts may be wasted. Those who have no particular interest in family history are unlikely to pony up the cost of a DNA test. Even if you offered to pay for it, just the effort of submitting the test may be more than they're willing to deal with. Also, ...


7

You should be very, very, careful with this. My alarm bells are set off, because despite the emphatic denial of your father's second cousin, he is still a strong candidate. He could know and not want to tell anyone. Or he might be the father and not know and never was told by the mother, or maybe the mother didn't even know that he specifically was the ...


4

Since you're asking about foreign governments as opposed to the United States, there's basically three answers as of right now: There isn't any. It may not invade your privacy, but your DNA may allow someone else's to be. It may not invade your privacy now, but it may in the future. Before I elaborate on those, I also want to highlight the fact that with ...


4

Your instructor has turned things quite around. When a person signs up to an online genealogy website, or any website or social site for that matter, there is an agreement that must be approved, that states what the company may do. (Ignore for now that most people don't read this and just check the box.) If the person checks the box, then they have given ...


1

One concern to get out of the way up front is how the sample is acquired. Be sure to explain that the test is done using saliva or a cheek swab (depending on the testing company), and not by blood. People who have never considered a test may assume it involves needles and blood. Vague Privacy Concerns Some people will feel that taking a test means that "...


1

I keep two online trees, a public version that strips all of that type of information, and a private one that includes everything. To access the private tree, users (family members) must login and be authorized. I find this eliminates a lot of the worries.


1

I would ask both the cemetery and the family for permission. Find a Grave posted pictures of my family members, in particular a brother and sister, and when my mom discovered this, it brought up a lot of grief and sadness and the painful reminder that they are not with us. As far as I know it is legal because it is open to the public, but out of ...


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