6

There may have been letters of administration granted after Dorothy's death. If so, the letters granted for the period October 19th 1848 - May 26th 1906 are held in Volume D/Y/A2/1 at Jersey Archives. From the information available on their site, it's not clear whether these have been individually indexed to be searchable online. Searching the database ...


6

Via Google books I searched in A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage, by Bryan A. Garner, Oxford University Press, 2001, On page 38 Garner lists age of capacity, age of consent, age of majority, and age of reason as terms which "share the general sense 'the age at which a person is legally capable (of doing something)'. But, over time, each term has assumed ...


6

0 (i.e. born before 20 Mar 1824). Anyone can be left a bequest in a will regardless of age - 1 day old or 100 years old. They need not even be born yet to be left a legacy. A will may or may not stipulate how the bequest should be handled in cases where the legatee is a minor. In those cases, the legacy may be paid out, for example, at age 21 or at marriage,...


5

The Freedom of Information Act 2000 applies to public authorities in England & Wales (there is equivalent legislation for Scotland). The solicitors will not be public bodies, so FoI will not apply to them. The only public body will be Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS). They will have discharged their normal obligations through publishing ...


4

Not very helpful but in the two cases where I have acted as the Executor of a will, I would say that the sole documentation generated was: The will itself; The Request for Probate; The information about the estate sent off with(?) the Request for Probate and destined for HM Revenue & Customs so that they knew the size of the estate and how much ...


2

Looking at the instructions for searching and ordering copies of wills on wills.gov.uk, 'Search for a Will': Not all grants of representation contain a will. Check the type of grant when you search: ‘Probate’ or ‘Grant and Will’ – a will exists and will be provided ‘Admon with Will’ or ‘Grant and Will’ – a will exists and will be provided ‘...


2

To determine the closest relative, draw a diagram. Great grandparent ┌────────┴────────┐ Great aunt/uncle Grandparent │ ┌─────┴─────┐ Lady Y Mother Aunt/Uncle │ │ Lady X Cousin │ Lady Z From this ...


2

Probate The New York State Archives' Probate Record Pathfinder says: Probate is the court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property, in some cases paying debts ...


2

The reason for a delayed probate like this, will be that (a) the family originally saw no reason to get probate (in 1871) but (b) they discovered something, or something happened to change their mind (circa 1911) that required probate. It might be, for instance, that in about 1911, someone discovered a bank account in Ann's name and the bank required probate ...


1

The bondsmen were the executors or administrators of the estate. It was the church courts that administered probate in England & Wales prior to 1858. The executors or administrators of an estate were frequently required to to enter into a bond with the church authorities before the court would grant probate. The bondsmen pledged to carry out a defined ...


1

As far as I am aware there are no centralised records that include documentation of how estates were distributed, whether or not a valid will existed. In addition to the suggestions made by @AdrianB38 and @JanMurphy, a few suggestions I can think of are: It might be possible to contact the solicitor involved in the grant of probate. I have previously ...


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