19

That does not list the beneficiaries, it lists the people to whom probate was granted, which is the executors of the will. If there had been no will, or if they were not the named executors, then it would say that letters of administration had been granted instead. In either case that is the people in charge of administering the estate not the people that ...


19

The obvious thing to check is whether the other children had died prior to the will being drawn up. Transcription To help you in this case, I have transcribed the will below: Extracted from the Registry of the Prerogative Court of York This is the Last Will and Testament of me Robert Fowler of Thorganby in the county of York farmer made this ...


16

As Tom says in his answer, the people mentioned are the executors of the estate. The record you are looking at is the National Probate Calendar, which is basically a detailed index of probate and administration records each year. You can order a copy of the actual will, which will usually give much more detailed information on legacies and beneficiaries. A ...


8

Here are some links to handwriting tutorials and other articles to help you get started: Palaeography: reading old handwriting 1500 - 1800: A practical online tutorial from The National Archives (UK) Script Tutorial: making sense of old handwriting from Brigham Young University a website for the course Early-Modern Palaeography at the University of ...


7

In the colonial period, language usage for kinship terms (and other terms) was not necessarily the same as it is today. Several of the 'how to' books I've read have said that in the colonial period, 'junior' and 'senior' were not necessarily indicative of father/son, but simply meant 'the younger' or 'the elder' if there were two men with the same name in ...


7

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) one meaning of cousin is: A collateral relative more distant than a brother or sister; a kinsman or kinswoman, a relative; formerly very frequently applied to a nephew or niece. Obsolete. The last quotation applicable to this meaning is dated 1747 (S. Richardson Clarissa I. vi. 36). (I only just noticed that'...


7

Having thought it through a bit, Google helped and I found this article on the FamilySearch Wiki that is adapted from a print article by respected genealogist, Anthony Camp. Although it is about bonds on marriage licences and the original question is about probate bonds in particular, I see no reason why what applies to one bond type shouldn't apply to them ...


6

Here's the link to a pdf article "Transcribing & Abstracting," by Linda Woodward Geiger that goes over abstracting that may be useful to you. In it, her example is in third person/past tense. There's also a section on the Board of Certified Genealogist's Certification website section "Skillbuilding: Producing Quality Research Notes," which gives some ...


6

...the said share and an insurance of Two pounds and Sixteen shillings... ...(and the receipt of which Alfred born... ...for their own respective use the said share... I agree with the other bolded words.


6

Yes, in the Unites States in the eighteenth century you will tend to find more probate records for males than females. In his study, "Underregistration and Bias in Probate Records: An Analysis of Data From Eighteenth Century Hingham, Massachusetts", Daniel Scott Smith determined that less than 6% of women and 36% of men left wills. Similarly, inventories for ...


6

"CH" refers to CHarles County, Maryland. "A" (meaning "account") can be found in these documents: "Abstracts of the Administration Accounts of the Prerogative Court; (multiple editions, called "Libers," see "Sources" below); V. L. Skinner, Jr. "D" stands for "deed." The numbers (5.150, for instance) come from the "Charles County Maryland Probate Records, ...


6

There may have been letters of administration granted after Dorothy's death. If so, the letters granted for the period October 19th 1848 - May 26th 1906 are held in Volume D/Y/A2/1 at Jersey Archives. From the information available on their site, it's not clear whether these have been individually indexed to be searchable online. Searching the database ...


5

Probate records for New York State are kept by the Surrogate's Court in each county. The website of the New York State Unified Court System says: Genealogy Research Since 1787, probate records like wills are filed and kept by the Surrogate's Court in each county. These records are available from the courthouse and appointments may be needed to view ...


5

The Pennsylvania Archive Series can be located in multiple places and it is sometimes called different things. I found it pretty quickly in the following two places. Ancestry.com has it online for its paid members as the Pennsylvania Archive Series 1664-1902. I also found it in one of my favorite places to sometimes monitor for historical items I do not ...


4

Most of the unindexed (not digitally indexed) probate books I've looked at on FamilySearch either have a separate index book, or a handwritten surname index in the first few pages of each volume. I looked at a couple of the Georgia rolls - both Fulton County (Atlanta) and Richmond County (Augusta) have separate indexes; Chatham County (Savannah) has a ...


4

The practice of requiring the executor of a deceased estate to post a financial bond against any malpractice in finalising the person's affairs continues to this day in some jurisdictions. This statement comes from Nova Scotia (Canada) Why is a bond required when a person dies without a will? When a person dies without a Will or when there is no ...


4

Somerset wills were sadly kept with Devon wills. See the page on the Somerset archives site where it says "The story of Somerset's wills is a sad one. Having been centralised at Exeter, most of the county's original probate records before 1858 were destroyed by German bombing in 1942, as were those for Devon." The link goes on to list options for finding ...


4

I think Jan has an excellent response for actually reading the will, but I will put out another solution or if anything supplementary information that you still may need after you read the will. There are other ways to determine the core question " I am trying to work out what land he owned and where it went when he died." you are attempting to gain an ...


4

Here are some resources to supplement the answer already given. In The Hidden Half of the Family, Christina K. Schaefer gives the following timeline for New York Probate laws (I've excerpted the relevant part from her larger timeline): 1771 private examinations and the practice of requiring a signature on a deed are enforced 1774 the intestacy law ...


4

The first Campbell in this document is a man with the initials of "S.A." and close family or personal ties to Ida W. Smith. You can tell that S.A. Campbell is a man because in the second image the clerk has edited all of the pre-printed plural language to read as singular masculine. The signature could easily be mistaken as "L.A.," but as @CRSouser mentioned ...


4

A fairly important piece of information omitted is what IR 27/17 actually contains. As you know, it is an index to the Death Duty registers. But this particular piece (IR 27/17) is an index to the Death Duty registers pertaining to administrations in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. Any search for a will is therefore futile. It is very unlikely this ...


4

A godson does not have to be any relation at all to his godparents, and often is not. I would think a godson is unlikely to also be a son-in-law, given godparents are named at the time of baptism (usually in infancy), and it would be a bit coincidental for the father of his future wife to be present. Given the information given here, my guess would be that ...


4

I have only experience dealing with colonial American wills, but those should be under the same norms as English. I've looked at dozens of wills from New England in the 17th and 18th centuries, and naming the wife, when alive, was definitely the norm. You are correct that coverture is an important consideration, but so too is the right of dower: https://...


3

It is true to say that a death can only be registered in the district in which it occurred. What can happen is that the information can be given to a registrar in another district who completes a legal form called a declaration and then sends that on to the correct district where the registration then actually takes place. The resultant register entry will ...


3

I can only say that when I submitted a Probate Application Form earlier this year, one of the documents required to go with it, was an "Official copy of death certificate or coroner's letter". The current form has no other space for the place of death, so the only current source can be the death certificate. The interesting aspect is that the idea that a ...


3

Kayer = A coarse sieve used to winnow corn (separate large from small) https://books.google.com/books?id=tUYOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA31&dq=kayer++corn+-layer&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CEgQ6AEwCGoVChMI0ZGO8umbyAIVhFiSCh09Zg62#v=onepage&q=kayer&f=false ----------------------------------------------------- Looms/Lomes = An open vessel of any kind; ...


3

Using Adrian's answer as a springboard, I searched for possible resources. The Devon Wills index formerly at British Origins has now been released at Find My Past. A list of the courts (including the PCC) whose records were used in compiling the index references courts in Dorset and Wiltshire but I don't see anything in the list specifically related to ...


3

The concept of next of kin has no definition in English law except in terms of the relatively recent Mental Health Act. So I would suggest some caution before attaching too much importance to this use of "only". I understand letters of administration would have been used if there was no will, or if the named executors of the will had died or were not able ...


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