Hot answers tagged

37

The simple answer is: they didn't. If they weren't literate (do you have any evidence they were?), then for the census they would have given their details verbally to somebody else to write down (e.g. census enumerator, or a neighbour) who wrote down what they thought they heard. And if the family concerned were illiterate, they wouldn't spot a mismatch. ...


13

For me, the answer to the question "Is there one generic process a researcher can follow to figure out what records are available for a particular place and time?" starts with a review of history, including learning what laws existed in that time and place which required people to keep records. My checklist looks like this: Learn what records ...


7

One possibility is that whoever completed the census return adjusted the surname to, as they saw it, fit in. This is certainly known to happen in Scotland as this link https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/surnames will illustrate - the particular aspect there is the Anglicisation of surnames and tweaking O'Brien to Brien would be an example of that sort ...


7

As a fellow rookie, one trick the others haven't mentioned, is to search the marriage registers in the parishes of Thorganby, Nether Poppleton, Fulford and Stillingfleet in the years 1740-1780 for marriages and marriage witnesses in the names of Hare and Fowler. That's the best way to build up a reliable FAN network - unless your man was a church warden - ...


6

The Social Security Administration's The History of the Social Security Number gives a timeline for the creation of the SSA and shows how the use of the Social Security number (SSN) as an ID number has expanded over time. It is useful to search more than one online source for the Social Security Death Index because not all sites report exactly the same ...


6

On the specific question of finding a woman's maiden name, see the answers to the question How to find wife's maiden name in New England in the 1700s? There are many things you can do to research questions from "burned" counties or other cases where records have been lost. All of these techniques can be productive things to do even if you already have the ...


6

I do a couple different things that are compact and will not draw attention. This is to avoid the potential hassle of being questioned about the use of a professional camera / lens and full size tripod; which may make them think you are trying to reproduce their content or interrupting other users. So my general workflow / variation: 1) Clean: The first ...


5

What I do is: 1: Set up a tripod with my camera on it ( I use a DSLR) 2: Ensure that the camera and microfilm reader screen are in the same plane so that I end up with a square not distorted image 3: Set the camera to manual focus, the lens to F4 and then take a couple of test shots and adjust the speed to get the best image. 4: Connect a remote shutter ...


5

Okay, so there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news first: At the moment (February 2019) all New York State adoptees' Original Birth Certificates (OBC's), and usually their adoption paperwork as well, are sealed. Totally sealed. Doesn't matter if the adoptees are dead, doesn't matter if they're alive and they already know all the info on the ...


5

When a question comes up about possible duplicate records and fraud, I think it's a good idea to step back and ask if you understand the record groups you are looking at. We have a similar question here about a different record type: Two ships, two manifests, same passengers? where someone asked about fraud on a passenger list, but there's a much simpler ...


5

They were illiterate. They were literate, but someone else was doing the actual writing. I've got some really SPECTACULAR misspelling of he last names of my ancestors from the time when census writers did the writing. The census worker would come and ask someone their name and write it down. If they didn't check the spelling, then whatever they wrote ...


5

It probably doesn't apply in your case, but there are certainly cases of people changing the spelling of their name to appear less like a particular ethnicity. For a personal example, my grandfather was full-blood Portuguese (though born in Boston) and his last name appeared to many in the US as something Hispanic. He changed the spelling from 'Freitas' to '...


4

Pamplona is in the region of Navarra and so you will need to search for records from this region. Family Search has quite a lot from this time period and is regularly adding more. Spanish records, in my experience, are normally very good with more information than you find in some other countries. You also need to be aware of naming conventions, the child ...


4

There is a Brazil Genealogy page at FamilySearch that leads to a Brazil Emigration and Immigration page that mentions Italy: From 1808 to 1940 immigrants came to Brazil from over 50 nations all over the world; most were from Portugal, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Japan, Russia, France, Spain, Turkey, the British Isles, and other South ...


4

Rather than ask the question "what steps should I take?" I like to ask "what steps can I take?" -- leaving the possibility open that there will be more than one approach. I want to use multiple approaches, because experience has taught me that I will find more records that way. Pretend you are doing an all-new search. Don't worry too much about what you ...


4

In talking about jewish sephardic genealogy, seems visiting the Sephardic Genealogy site is a must. There you can read about what to expect in finding vital records for Morrocan Jewry. I began recently researching my wife's side, which introduced me to Sephardic genealogy. I am mostly familiar with the Ashkenazic one.


4

There is a Russian website that has a project going to provide the data within pdf format spreadsheets. These are also in Russian and provided according to Russian province. You can find these records at http://svrt.ru/1914/1914-1.htm .


4

Review all the information you have collected so far, do a fresh analysis of the sources you have, and create a research plan. Also, if you haven't done so already, look for more general information about German immigration and German history, so that you can recognize the significance of clues when you find them. Start with what you know, and work ...


4

As far as I know the only approaching a national death index for the US is the Social Security Death Index which is described by Wikipedia as follows: Most persons who have died since 1936 who had a Social Security Number (SSN) and whose death has been reported to the Social Security Administration are listed in the SSDI. So while it won't list ...


4

Re the period in Rock Ferry: Trade Directories for Cheshire can be found on the Cheshire Archives & Local Studies site - their scanned images of trade directories look useful as there are three Kelly's Directories from 1902, 1906, 1910 - these can be downloaded in .PDF format - several files per directory. Also of value is the Historical Directories ...


4

Passenger lists to and from Europe were not routinely kept in the UK; only passenger lists from ports outside Europe were recorded. In a few cases passengers are listed where they joined at an intermediate stop (e.g. Melbourne to Antwerp to London). The record you mention I believe are records of immigration created by the Antwerp authorities for foreigners ...


4

Westminster Diocesan Archives are based in Kensington and have a comprehensive guide to the sacramental registers they hold available through the Family History pages of their website. https://rcdow.org.uk/diocese/archives/


4

The following may be relevant (and should also be available on Ancestry). Reference: PROB 11/1815/360 Description: Will of Robert Fowler, Farmer of Thorganby , Yorkshire Date: 31 May 1833 Held by: The National Archives, Kew Legal status: Public Record(s) Closure status: Open Document, Open Description http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/...


4

What scheme are you using to assess your sources? A baptism record from a website would be considered Primary Derivative Direct according to Elizabeth Shown Mills assessment scheme which is widely used. Re gaps, you can only rely on the coverage information from the various providers (and some testing because not all providers are entirely accurate about ...


3

Most obvious thing to try would be Electoral Rolls which would show place of residence in October of each year. Even with often poor scanning I've had good results on ancestry for London - don't know if the rest of the country is available.


3

You can do genealogy research in Romania, just that it has to be of the "legal" rather than the "purely historical" kind. What I mean is that you should start with your wife's birth certificate. It will list her parents' names and dates of birth, as well as place of birth. She (and only she) can ask for their own birth certificates, based on these data, from ...


3

You're right, up until a few years ago it was very difficult to get any kinds of records from this area. The LDS has not gotten permission to film in the regional Romanian archives, though they've been trying very hard for years. Luckily, JewishGen.org just recently acquired[1] a ton of records for the areas of Romania that were once part of Hungary (i.e. ...


3

Some ships were sent from Flanders to Scotland to return survivors back to Spain. A full account of the fate of survivors can be found in: The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland by Ken Douglas (Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, 2009). No names, only what happened to them.


3

What records were created? Some clues to what records might have been created can be found by looking at modern-day requirements for starting a business, then researching when that requirement was made into law. Some examples: small businesses are usually required to have a business license, to publish notices to establish their name/DBA (Doing Business As)...


3

Here's the checklist I use when when trying to find records about a place or topic: Learn what records might have been created in a particular time and place. Research which of those records might still exist, and which records are accessible to the public. Research what repositories might hold those records. Research which online repositories might hold ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible