5

I don’t know a single website addressing most relevant topics for beginners. The following book however is suitable for this purpose: Blaine T. Bettinger: The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy (Family Tree Books, October 13, 2016), ISBN 1440345325 ( I am not affiliated with the author or publisher.)


5

Searching for and investigating any Canadian hints in the Hindley family's known FAN club might be my next step as it could add more people and points for research. The Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society has information and guides to types of records, including the 1842 census records for Toronto, and various links on its website which may ...


5

Toronto Public Library has some scanned publications available about the history of Toronto. Local History & Genealogy Toronto had 5 ‘wards’ in 1843 according to Wikipedia and the outlying areas (if they lived in the 'country') which could be anywhere from Richmond Hill to Holland Landing (Simcoe County) north of the city and also communities to the ...


4

City Directories The Toronto Public Library has a wide range of City Directories, some of which are available online. For the period I am looking at, they have: The Toronto directory and street guide, for 1843-4 by H. & W. Rowsell (Firm) (eBook, 1843) Brown's Toronto city and Home District directory 1846-7 by by George Brown (Firm) (eBook, 1846) ...


3

Here is a list of tips before visiting the Family History Library. Not exactly a checklist, but it's helpful. It looks like you've done some explorations in the catalog on FamilySearch.org. The catalog does give a general description of the types of records in each film. Make sure you've done as much advance work as you can before you leave. It will be ...


3

I always recommend the Wiki at the ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy) site for any and all information on genetic genealogy. For beginning material, they have an entire page of Beginners' guides to genetic genealogy with links to Articles, Resources, Company articles, Paths of DNA inheritance, Guidelines and standards, Mailing lists and ...


2

Part of the problem you are encountering is that Canada was not a country until 1867 and there was no requirement to archive documents prior to 1865. You can try doing an ancestor search on the Library and Archives website, but it is likely that you are researching earlier than the records exist: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/search/Pages/ancestors-search....


2

I can recommend you two great blogs regarding the question https://dna-explained.com/ https://gcbias.org/ They can be difficult to read though but both resources are very useful and shed light on some important but non-obvious matters.


2

If you're looking for a quick easy guide to commercial tests, I wrote a blog post about this which can be found here: http://familytreetips.co.uk/2016/08/13/an-easy-guide-to-commercial-genealogical-dna-tests/


1

The repository is the place where the record is located – in this case it appears to be Brisbane Registry. It doesn't matter whether you ordered the certificate online, by mail, went to the repository in person, etc. I would be careful relying too much on linking to individual pages on a government website as these change very frequently and will likely ...


1

Learning more about each source will help me narrow down exactly which rolls I need to search. Finding General information about the sources The Family History Wiki Article German Word List provides a basic list of German words and an English translation, so that the user can see Bürgerbuch is a citizen register. Searching the FamilySearch Wiki for the term &...


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