7

A friend has offered to take me along on her trips to the local FHC, which has prompted me to think about the question of how to make a general checklist to use while I am pulling and viewing microfilm. Reference works called registers e.g. Register of New York City death records describe the holdings at the FHL and the process needed to use them. If a user ...


3

Judy G. Russell, who writes the blog "The Legal Genealogist", has given a webinar That First Trip to the Courthouse which is an hour-long presentation on how to prepare for a courthouse trip, and what kinds of records that you might find there. Her webinar is available to members of the Florida State Genealogical Society, where she presented it last fall, ...


3

What a great opportunity for you. I would suggest the county recorders office for land records, and many other kinds of documents such as tax liens, some types of business documents, and mortgages. Also check with the county level courts for civil, and criminal court records. Life happens, when it does it usually leaves a paper trail. These types of records ...


1

The county historical society in my hometown may be unique (and it's not in Tennessee), but they keep an index of local obituaries and their associated publication dates in the local newspapers, which are on microfilm, and a file cabinet of funeral cards that have been collected or donated over the years. They also have various "History of (Town)" books ...


1

I would look for death certificates. They can reveal quite a bit of detail and if you're in the right place (right county), you might be able to look at a lot of family members at once.


1

To the excellent suggestions already posted, I would add: If you have a smartphone or tablet, check the conference website to see if they have an app. If you have not gone all-digital and are likely to pick up paper handouts and flyers, take along something to collect them. I like poly envelopes and small (6-slot) accordion files -- the ones with velcro ...


1

Here are some tips that I've gotten from J. Mark Lowe, F. Warren Bittner, Judy G. Russell, and Elizabeth Shown Mills that I'm trying to put into practice in my own research: Make a research plan. Yes, everyone says so, but Lowe breaks everything down and specifies what he wants to look for in meticulous detail. He puts all his tasks on individual index ...


1

http://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/ Have records of birth, marriage, death and other kind of records digitalized (some of them indexed so you can search on them) It begin in the early 1800s up to 1900 I found there my 6th upper ancestor PD: This is one of the sources of familysearch.org


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible