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One strategy is to examine the passenger manifest from her arrival and note the names in the other columns. We see that her nearest relative is her mother Maryanna Korzautkowska in (illegible) "Plock." Looking up and down that column, we see several other passengers' relatives are in "Plock." "Plock" may be an actual place in ...


3

Mishaf is an anglicization of Michov (they are identical when said with the applicable accent), which is the Yiddish name for the town of Michów, about 75mi SE of Warsaw. When he was born, it was in the Russian Empire, and when he naturalized, it was Poland (and is Poland today)


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Phonetically, my immediate guess was Kalyazin in Tver' oblast, Russia. (However this town is north of Moscow and not very close to Poland.)


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My guess would be that when immigrating, the Keslers never bothered to think how their place of origin spells in English. Later, when their mastery of written English grew, they never bothered to change the spelling of the faraway location in order to have papers "consistent with prior statement". It is an actual problem for a lot of people to ...


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As you have discovered, it can be tricky to find a person's origin if you only have one document. Your first step should be to find more documents in the US to see if you can get more information. Different documents might give you other clues, either a different spelling of the same name, a different jurisdiction, or a name of a nearby town. When you ...


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I've been researching my grandfather, who lived in Korets [now Ukraine] and emigrated to Boston, MA. In the early 1900s, a family in Boston, with the same surname as mine, reported their place of birth as "Zvill". I'm not sure they are my relatives but, Novohrad-Volynskyi is less than 40 miles from Korets. These individuals are buried in the ...


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