Hot answers tagged

7

I realize this is a bit of a ramble, and probably not the answer you are looking for. There is something of real value in the question you are asking, and a solution (by extension) would be equally valuable. I would start by splitting up the answer into several components: Version control & collaboration Data format Visualization Integration Version ...


7

You already mentioned git-ged, which is really the only thing at github that comes close to what it seems you want. Dovy Paukstys added a git entry for SourceTemplates two years ago, but you won't find anything there. Git is for real geeks and/or programmers, and most genealogists aren't up to snuff to use it. The tool for most genealogists that is most ...


7

My main software is Calico Pie's Family Historian 6, which contains among its many features the capability to print booklets. You can see some screenshots on the tour page. See the FHUG's Knowledge Base article: Report Content, Media, Format and Layout and other related articles in the wiki for some how-to articles. Calico Pie says the book creation ...


6

I welcome your plan to preserve the diaries and make them available to others. If the relative already gave you the diaries, there is some common ground to discuss the other resources. Scanning them is surely not negated and doing so would be my priority. Then you could ask if she is planning to give the documents and photos away somewhen and to whom. ...


5

It seems that you, her son, has acquired your mother's materials and has already invested at least some time thinking about this as you are now asking this question of what to do with it. Since you say no one else in the family has interest, the obligation is on you. So it will depend how much time you wish to invest. If nothing else, you should at least ...


4

I would hate to see all that work lost, and I would expect that the materials might be of much interest to at least one amongst your more distant cousins. I suspect that your mother would have been born within the last 100 years which means that our Privacy Policy will come into effect with any mention of her name. On the other hand if your grandparents, ...


4

The thing to realize is that DNA science is new and quickly evolving as more people test and the science gets better and more granular. As such it was identified a couple years ago that Haplogroups need to be fairly often revised as new discoveries are made. The last major update was in 2014, and K2B2 used to generically just be K-M526. Although K-M526 ...


4

If your blog is targeted at local historians and genealogists, get ahold of your local history and genealogy groups and make them aware of your blog and to tell their members. They will come back if you have new or interesting content for them, and they will comment as well if something tweaks their interest. Remember that the world sees your blog. Lots of ...


3

I would suggest Tribal Pages. This has a number of pricing tiers, the basic level is free and seems adequate for your requirements. For more people, photos and notes, charges start to apply. You receive a site with your own subdomain name of the form [user].tribalpages.com. You can upload a Gedcom file to create your tree. Then, add notes and photos to ...


3

You can upload your GEDCOM to a free Ancestry.com account. Simply enter your name, email address and password. On the next page click the "get started" link under "Build a family tree." This takes you to the "Start your family tree for free" page. In the top bar, click "TREES" and then choose "Upload a GEDCOM." You can set the tree to public (non-living ...


3

You have to transcribe it, and publish those transcriptions. Such diaries are like gold dust and have to be shared, as you say. Scanning will help preserve the the written form but sharing needs a textual form. They will undoubtedly reference other people, and for those references to be found by other researchers then you need transcriptions. Google cannot ...


3

Ultimately I think any decision on this depends on What you've got How interested you are How much work you want to do If the records are just a box of clippings, pictures, certificates etc then they are likely to be of interest only to another researcher, which will probably be a relative. It sounds like you've covered that line of enquiry, though as @...


3

{substantially edited} I have had a similar need: to share trees with images and biographies -- subscription-free. In principle, the research, data entry and design of your tree is a separate thing from its sharing for viewing purposes. The online sites are good at the former but not the latter because they rarely have a separate, subscription-free interface ...


3

Another good method of future-proofing is to post your familytree information (about non-living people) online in a variety of places, for example: WeRelate.org and WikiTree. I also post much of my genealogy research on my blog and then regularly save those posts at the Internet Archive (which is like a free online archives for web pages).


3

The problem with family trees is that there is not really a vertical or a horizontal way of going through it. There's just branches of varying sizes, which don't translate well over into the one dimensional path that a book is. A difficulty with a "vertical" or top-to-bottom approach is that to prevent redundancy, each of the chapters may have to begin at a ...


2

Sounds like a case of miscommunication between you and your uncle. Although it sounds as if he gave you permission to edit his tree, and therefore implied that he wanted you to make edits, it would have been courteous to contact him directly and find out his goals for that particular tree before you make any changes. Was the tree intended to focus on your ...


2

Tiny Tafels are still useful for sharing surname interests in mailing lists or newsgroups. The problem is that most of the software for editing and matching them is old. I still run a Tiny Tafel Editor using DOSBox under Windows. It won't run in normal Windows because the clock speed of modern computers is too high.


2

Genealogists will never use git directly, but a frontend is eminently possible. Neither XML or (to a lesser extent) json map well to a line-based version control system (because it can be hard to retain the structure when a individual lines are changed by different people at the same time). The only real problem with using git for version control of ...


2

There have been some great responses on this already but I have not seen a couple key points mentions so I will put out what my plans are that I have specifically outlined. I make lots of backups of my data in multiple formats, both in the program I use formats as well as export trees to text and word formats. You also need to back it up to multiple ...


2

I was left in a similar situation when my mother died in 2013. She had done much more genealogy research than the little she occasionally mentioned. I have a large box of information she dug up, and another large box of pictures. She also created a extensive chart of ancestors, both on her side and my father's. One of the first things I'm doing is ...


1

I published a family history book about the ancestors of my paternal grandparents. Part 1 is my grandfather's ancestors and part 2 is my grandmother's. Each chapter is a separate branch...a different surname. The chapter begins with the earliest known ancestor and continues generation by generation, including historical detail, until a daughter marries out ...


1

I would suggest the Internet Archive as a good permanent online home for these sorts of things. You can include lots of metadata, and easily link to and from other places on the web. The IA is a non-profit organisation that aims at long-term preservation of digital items. If someone makes a copyright claim against one of your items, it may be taken down — ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible