7

The text appears to refer to the "Island of Demarara" - note spelling. The "e" occurs in various places (beginning of 3rd line in "equal", end of 2nd line in "transfer"). After the "e" there are 3 verticals of the "m". The "a" is fairly clear. The "r" is in "fourth" in 3rd line, and "property" on 2nd line. Can't see a capital "D" anywhere else but it ...


6

The "y" is actually a thorn, so the text seems to read: July the 24th a girl that liveth with Stephen Dudderidge called Elizabeth. It is an unusual form of words though.


5

The entries begin "Item uppon the...". Item is a Latin word meaning "also", commonly found in British parish registers and documents such as inventories where entries are written in list. On its etymology, Wiktionary states: The word started as Latin item for "also", "in the same manner", and got its present English meaning from a misunderstanding of ...


5

I grew up in that part of the world and can trace a remarkably similar migration pattern between Somerset and Dorset in my ancestors - particularly Gillingham, Wiveliscombe and Old Cleeve. Much of what I have learnt comes from local history handed down in the family and by visiting farming museums in Somerset (particularly this one in Glastonbury). 18th ...


4

Somerset wills were sadly kept with Devon wills. See the page on the Somerset archives site where it says "The story of Somerset's wills is a sad one. Having been centralised at Exeter, most of the county's original probate records before 1858 were destroyed by German bombing in 1942, as were those for Devon." The link goes on to list options for finding ...


4

I've moved the research plan / search results from the question into a self-answer. Somerset Marriages A search of FreeBMD turned up a candidate for a marriage registered Mar 1845 in Wellington Reg District for a Stephen Rossiter. A Postem on that entry says: Stephen married Ann COURT (bap 21 Apr 1822, Chipstable, Somerset). Her details were added ...


4

Militia records tend to be split between county record offices (ROs) and The National Archives (TNA) at Kew. I am unsure of the basic difference between these two sets of records but suspect that records of recruitment will tend to belong in county ROs as militia recruitment was a county responsibility - the Lord Lieutenant usually. Whereas when they were ...


4

Marriage Licenses (as opposed to records of the marriages themselves) will contain maiden names. These documents are processed through a different route so in the event of loss of parish registers and Bishops' Transcripts, offer another possibility. Note two things - firstly these are not actually licenses but Bonds and Allegations - the actual licences ...


3

Using Adrian's answer as a springboard, I searched for possible resources. The Devon Wills index formerly at British Origins has now been released at Find My Past. A list of the courts (including the PCC) whose records were used in compiling the index references courts in Dorset and Wiltshire but I don't see anything in the list specifically related to ...


3

The concept of next of kin has no definition in English law except in terms of the relatively recent Mental Health Act. So I would suggest some caution before attaching too much importance to this use of "only". I understand letters of administration would have been used if there was no will, or if the named executors of the will had died or were not able ...


3

I first read the place name as the Island of Jemarara, but can't find any online reference to such a place. I found several contemporary references to the "island of Demarara", such as a London Gazette chancery notice for a Reverend Benjamin Thomas Williams who died at St Mattthew in the island of Demarara, in the West Indies. I am not sure which of the ...


2

In the case of my husband's grandfather, we found a muster roll online about the WWI members on a website created about his unit by the Vietnam veterans. I think it's safe to say that it's less likely that you will find an equivalent roster for someone who served in the 1790s, but never say never. There's no telling what you might be able to find about the ...


1

If your John is the one baptised at Kingsbury Episcopi in 1774, then it is very unlikely that he was the son of Henry Brown. He is recorded as the base-born son of Mary Brown, and Henry Brown and his wife Mary baptised a son Thomas only a couple of months earlier and others earlier still and later. There were three Mary Browns baptised in the 1730s who could ...


1

The eldest son of my 5th great grandparents Edward Chichester and Constant Lyddon, who married on 6 Jun 1765 at Leighland Chapel, Old Cleeve, was John and he was baptised on 29 Sep 1765 at Leighland Chapel, Old Cleeve. Do not be surprised if you see that baptism recorded as 29 Sep 1775 because 1775 is what it clearly says in the image, but it is at the ...


1

Going through your list of unusual things about this record: Mrs Elizabeth Courtnay 'Mrs' did not refer to a married woman in the 1730s. It was a title of status. In her journal article titled Mistresses and marriage: or, a short history of the Mrs, Amy Erickson puts it nicely: Today the most common use of the word 'mistress' is in its abbreviated ...


1

This answer does not address the main part of the question about whether the marriage is in some way unusual in the wording of its record. However, I am posting it to try and shed light on whether the marriage record could "give credence to my theory that the John Chichester who married in 1732 at Horton could be the same John Chichester who baptised a son ...


1

I can partially answer my own question. The reason for Martha and Robert being at Broadwey appears to be that three of Martha's siblings (John, Rachel and Ann), and later her mother (Martha nee Derriman) lived there. It may be particularly relevant that her younger sister Rachel had two illegitimate children, in 1800 and 1801, christened at Broadwey so ...


1

I now think that the John Stacey baptised on 30 Mar 1759 at North Petherton, Somerset to Henry and Elizabeth (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N5WC-X2D) was not my 4th great grandfather. Instead I believe he originates from much closer to London based mainly on 1986 writings by my 2nd cousin twice removed Albert Ernest Stacy in "Colonial Cameos and ...


1

I have just been contacted by a descendant of Giles Chichester from Demerara in Guyana, and for the first time I expect to be able to assemble evidence that he was living in Demerara like his two brothers (Jared and Thomas) and uncle (William). My distant cousin from Demerara has not been able to locate the Will of Giles either but I am hoping she/he will ...


1

Updated information on Islands of Demerara (Guyana) from Wikipedia: Essequibo Islands-West Demerara (Region 3) is a region of Guyana, split in two by the Essequibo River. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the north, the region of Demerara-Mahaica to the east, the region of Upper Demerara-Berbice to the south and the regions of Pomeroon-...


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