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10

For some details of FamilySearch's PAL system (Persistent Archive Links), see "PALs that aren't PALs for long? A problem with some links in Massachusetts Land Records" on their GetSatisfaction site, submitted abt end March 2014 by user GeneJ. (And yes, I am aware of the irony of including a link!) PALs are apparently FamilySearch's own technology, which ...


7

Here's one possible research plan. Take all the information and clues you have and assemble them in chronological order on a timeline. Also make a list of assertions which have no time element. Break these items down into smaller and smaller questions and investigate these questions separately, as if you are dealing with a case where multiple people all ...


6

If you went around to researchers and asked them this question, I suspect you'd get a different answer for each one. Here are some of your options for recording genealogical information: paper systems designed for genealogy research, such as the forms in the workbook accompanying Emily Anne Croom's book Unpuzzling Your Past software made specifically for '...


6

I suspect it was the 1939 Register, as that shows a Catherine Cowin with birth date 24 Dec 1878 living in Liverpool C.B. Keep in mind that birth dates on the 1939 Register were recorded as given by the household head, and errors were not uncommon. Frequently I find the year slightly off. For more information on birth date errors see How accurate are birth ...


6

Speaking from a UK perspective: The idea that stuff is disappearing behind pay-walls pops up frequently. I have continually challenged those who say this happens to give me an example. Not one person has done so. The basic truth is: All stuff that appears on a pay-site continues to be available wherever it previously was - Archives, Record Office, public ...


6

My recommendation for source material is to record the source document as a source in your source list, and link that to the person/place/website where you got it as a repository in your list of repositories. This is the way the GEDCOM specifications recommends. Most genealogy software at least loosely follows GEDCOM and will keep your sources and your ...


6

Up to 1983 the registers were quarterly, so the index entry gives the quarter when the event was registered. There is no way of telling the month of registration from the index entry alone. In 1984 the GRO moved from quarterly to annual indexes, and entries include the month of registration. But on their own site the GRO don't show the month, they have '...


5

To some extent at least this is a question of personal preference, and your two suggested alternatives are both kind of extreme options, just at opposite ends of the scale. Personally I tend to create one source for each authority that collects and stores the registration records. So I have sources for civil registrations with names like: Register of ...


5

If you Google something to get to a website, you would not usually think of citing Google. By that same reasoning, you have no obligation to cite the intermediary source that may have led you to the actual source of information. While not citing any sources is a bigger problem, I also think there can be a problem of overciting in genealogy. It is so easy ...


5

You can only repost something if it's out of copyright or it is in copyright but the copyright owner has licensed it to be reposted in the way that you want to do it. Do not assume that the stuff is there legally in the first place. Yes, it's a minefield. Even my summary is probably suspect.


5

Almost all of the Crudgington trees on Ancestry.com about the Crudgingtons to the 1400s ultimately come from my work. I have used manorial records and wills to do this; the manorial records clearly state when the farm lease was transferred from father and mother to son, and the years in which this happened, and sometimes the mother's father's name. eg. 1483(...


5

I disagree with the other answers in that I would not include an image (or full text), of any recent personal correspondence in a database accessible to others, without their express permission. When someone writes you an email they usually do not expect you to post it on the internet for all to see. Whether or not the email contains sensitive information, ...


5

If you click on an event, it highlights all the sources (there can be more than one) linked to that event. If you click on a source it highlights all the individuals and events linked to that source.


5

Just wanted to add my support to Audrey's answer and to add a bit about citing references to GRO (English/Welsh) certificates. There are now two versions of the GRO index. The contemporary handwritten/typeset/computer-generated indexes which were compiled up to 1983 in quarterly volumes and from 1984, in annual volumes. These were compiled by clerks at the ...


5

In the original case above the only original document involved is the register entry held by the registration office. In addition to the year/quarter, there are three elements which make up the unique reference. District: Wigan & Leigh ( which has a code of 0181C) Register Number: C19B (This refers to a physical binder containing individual register ...


5

Heretical though it may be - I will say that there is no right way to do a citation. Only useful ways. What is useful to me, may not be useful to someone else. In addition, if they are read by someone totally ignorant of the topic, they will be useless. So - a couple of comments first. That Wikipedia reference appears to be what you'd put in a Wikipedia ...


5

The best available answer to this question is provided in the 16 page document The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 142 (2011) pages 5 through 20 , that describes the Cowen sisters introduction and involvement with genealogical research. That article leads to American Ancestors - the legacy of Gertrude Audrey Barber, that article details ...


4

@JanMurphy in her answer has nicely described the usefulness of source-centric software in a case like this. However, as the most widely used software is lineage-linked, you raise an important question. There is no right or wrong way to record uncertain information, but I think some approaches are better than others. In my lineage-linked database, my goal ...


4

Rather than ask the question "what steps should I take?" I like to ask "what steps can I take?" -- leaving the possibility open that there will be more than one approach. I want to use multiple approaches, because experience has taught me that I will find more records that way. Pretend you are doing an all-new search. Don't worry too much about what you ...


4

An online article from The Star (Toronto ON) confirmed my hazy memory of the release of the 1921 Canada census -- it was available very quickly because of partnership with ancestry.com: 1921 Canadian census data released online, to genealogists’ delight (Fri., Aug. 9, 2013) The 1921 census was released by Library and Archives Canada on the Ancestry.ca ...


4

I was looking on the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (https://www.familysearch.org/indexing/projects/country/ca) and saw that they are in the process of indexing and reviewing the 1926 Canadian Census records. As of today, they are 40% indexed with 31% reviewed. I am not sure if they are providing the indexing for LAC but I guess time will ...


4

Passenger lists were not required for travel within the UK, or even between the UK and Europe. See TNA Passenger Lists Guide. The one exception to that is when "a ship called at more than one European port before travelling further afield." And vice versa for inbound traffic. So far as I know all passenger traffic between Ireland and mainland Britain was ...


4

The big data providers license the data sets from the relevant rights-holder e.g. TNA for censuses, ONS for Civil registration indices. They take care to cite the source of what they're displaying (probably a condition of their licence), and typically do their own indexing and imaging. (One notable exception is some of the Civil Registration data provided by ...


4

I would suggest that it's very rare that a source provides evidence for just one fact, so the media needs to be ultimately accessible from all the relevant facts. You therefore don't want to add it individually to each of those facts because repetition is never good, especially if you need to adjust something and have all the repetitions to adjust. And then ...


4

ONS (Office for National Statistics) only appears because it happened to be the parent department of the GRO (General Register Office) at the time when FreeBMD obtained permission to use their index information and images. But in 2008 the GRO was transferred to what is now the Passport Office. The GRO has had several different parent departments since its ...


3

I didn’t really intend to answer my own question, and this post should not deter any others. Some possible sources include: The National Archives Manorial Documents Register (also for the rest of the UK). Some county archives include pedigrees in their collection. The listing of those held by Shropshire county archives incidentally includes a listing for a ...


3

It is your decision what goes in there. At a minimum it should be sufficient information to allow someone else to take your reference easily find the source document and check your transcription of the data. Website links can be helpful but are limited in that websites can disappear and or pages get moved. I always attach an image to my source citation ...


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