10

Name changes are just awkward, and there's no real perfect way to handle them. The general standard is to record names as they were at birth. For example, in genealogies women are usually recorded under their maiden name not their married name. In the interest of equality I see no reason why the same principle should not apply to men who change their name. ...


7

I realize this is a bit of a ramble, and probably not the answer you are looking for. There is something of real value in the question you are asking, and a solution (by extension) would be equally valuable. I would start by splitting up the answer into several components: Version control & collaboration Data format Visualization Integration Version ...


6

It is possible that the GenBridge technology, developed by WhollyGenes - the maker of The Master Genealogist can read those files. The reason why I believe so is that Wholly Genes developed GenBridge quite a number of years ago to read in the formats available at the time, but haven't updated it. Tamura Jones writes that GenBridge supports FTW, FTM and FBK ...


6

The following symbols are used in genograms and other descendant charts to denote a childless union and individuals without children: (Google: chart symbols "no offspring" for examples of use and other variant forms) Pedigree charts (where all the parents/ancestors of course have an offspring) don't need this symbol. Genealogical reports tend to use ...


5

The file extension *.FTW indicates that the files was created by FTM for Windows (FTW). As you have experienced, New Family Tree Maker has limited support for import from Family Tree Maker Classic; it will not import files created by FTM 4.0 or earlier versions. I believe FTW 16 will read all older versions of FTM for DOS, FTM (for Windows), even *.FBK and *...


5

While there may be an official standard GED grammar, there are many nonstandard tags that are now widely used. Therefore, using BNF may or may not be the "easiest way". Nevertheless, a quick google brings up this Gedcom 5.5.1 grammar file.


5

Which county? I would suggest that deciding to align to what 'typical genealogists' do is not a good idea if it works counter to (a) your software or (b) your immediate intended audience. (Emphasis on 'immediate' audience as our total intended audience should surely be anyone and everyone - however, surely we should prioritise?). If your software allows ...


5

Yes, there is the COPR tag for this purpose in the header of the GEDCOM file. In GEDCOM v 5.5.1 (1999), the de facto standard: n HEAD +1 COPR <COPYRIGHT_GEDCOM_FILE> COPYRIGHT_GEDCOM_FILE:= {Size=1:90} A copyright statement needed to protect the copyrights of the submitter of this GEDCOM file. Creative Commons did not exist in 1999 so there is ...


5

I think you'll find just about every genealogy program makes many mistakes when exporting their GEDCOM. Some of them even add their own illegal GEDCOM on purpose because they want to export some data they don't believe GEDCOM handles. You'll find a number of people who have analyzed mistakes made in GEDCOM by certain programs and posted about them, ...


5

Take a look at these Downloadable Image Icons for On-Line Family Trees provided on the blog Genealogy Junkie. Sue Griffith created these to mark which lines were verified by DNA research and which were still questionable. Her example looks like this: Sue writes: The Question Mark is useful to use as the "profile picture" for tentative individuals (...


4

There are policies on this subject in some areas related to genealogy. The General Register Office have rules for UK civil registration that require all registrations to show place names (and counties) as they are at the time the event is registered, not as they may have been historically (even if that would have been correct at the time) So as an example, ...


4

The GEDCOM 5.5 specification provides most explanation about the link inside the individual record, pointing to the family record. It says: The normal lineage links are shown through the use of pointers from the individual to a family through either the FAMC tag or the FAMS tag. The FAMC tag provides a pointer to a family where this person is a child. ...


4

It appears there is no set standard in recording name changes. Some sites offer a special section to add an alias or alternate name, but if you're looking to print-out your family tree (like I am), there is no standard form. According to this guide found on a parenting site, you should use the birth name and add to your notes married names (or in your case ...


4

Ancestry's tree allows the addition of further names that are referred to as Alternate Names - an Alternate can be marked as the Primary if it is desired to swap them. That being so, I'd record each of the names separately and never as a composite. Which gets set as the Primary is a moot point. Tradition says that we should use the name at birth - I am ...


4

Unfortunately, as you likely know, GEDCOM predates DNA research for genealogy and does not have specific tags or specific instructions for dealing with DNA data. As far as new standards go, BetterGEDCOM started discussing DNA but never defined anything. And GEDCOM X and FHISO have not yet delved into DNA. For now, if you want to record in MacFamilyTree, ...


4

To answer this question, I have to ask another one: how can we define "most genealogists"? Another thing to consider is how you are going to make use of the place data when you see it in your family history software. Finding Materials in Library Catalogs I did a place search for England in the Family History Library's catalog. For "Places within ...


4

I agree with the previous answers that protecting the privacy of your half-brother and his family is very important and should be your primary consideration, along with their own wishes about whether they want to be included. In my own online trees, which are private, I only have the information about the members of my family who are already deceased. ...


4

I would enter this as one fact. I would use the date form: FROM date1 TO date2 and put the individual dates and description in the notes. My reasoning is that I would want to keep all the info and sources about these very related events together to make analysis easier. This also avoids repeating some of the same information several times.


4

I just came across this, as the 70th anniversary of Dixie Kiefer's death is approaching this year. I am a reporter at the Poughkeepsie Journal who is preparing a story about the crash. I also have copies of the Nov. 12, 1945 editions of our newspaper, which recount in detail the crash and search. And today, I hiked to the crash site, where wreckage of the ...


4

The Wikipedia article Ancestry.com has a table under the section heading "FTM version history" which lists the Banner Blue software as the earliest versions from 1989-1994 (pre-Broderbund), running under DOS and Windows 3.1 (FTM on the DOS version, FTW on the Windows version). (Note that the authors of the Wikipedia article are unaware of a Mac ...


3

I highly doubt there is a genealogical standard for something like this, nor, one might argue, does there need to be. If the meaning is clear, the essential genealogical standards have been met. Typically the usual English short form names of countries are acceptable in genealogy because they are perfectly clear. Thus, the United States, Mexico, and Canada ...


3

I think the best practice will be to enter three Marriage Banns events, one for each date on which the Marriage Banns were read. However, to be practical, and especially if I were short on time and/or energy then I might just create an event for the first reading of Marriage Banns, with its date, and include in the description the three dates on which they ...


3

COPR (Copyright) is just a claim of copyright...and legally speaking, copyright is not the same as a license for use and distribution (like Creative Commons). You don't want to conflate the two if you really want legal protection (or the appearance of it). I would recommend putting your copyright statement by itself clearly in a COPR tag: 1 COPR ...


3

I found an Elizabeth Shown Mills post on her blog with A Dozen Conventions You Want to Know About. She says (Rule 2): "When the person used a nickname, we put that nickname in quotation marks after the given names. Example: Robert Edward “Ted” Turner." She also says (Rule 4): When we write the name of a married female of the past, we put the ...


3

NSFX in GEDCOM is one of the name pieces, specifically the suffix piece. GEDCOM gives "jr." as an example, but it could also include anything else that might be legally after the person's surname and a part of their name, e.g. "III", "Esq", etc. It is used along with the other name pieces, specifically NPFX (prefix), GIVN (given)...


2

This case is a good illustration of how our genealogy software doesn't serve us well. We focus on entering information into our software about people, when in actuality, the tasks we perform are searching for records about people, analyzing the information in the records, and recording what we have found. If you have a Church of England parish register, ...


2

It is your family tree - you can include anyone you like. It is perfectly acceptable and appropriate to include your half-brother's son and his family. It appears from your tag that you are using Ancestry.com. If this is the case, then living people should be automatically hidden from public view. Only you and the people you let access the tree would be ...


2

Genealogists will never use git directly, but a frontend is eminently possible. Neither XML or (to a lesser extent) json map well to a line-based version control system (because it can be hard to retain the structure when a individual lines are changed by different people at the same time). The only real problem with using git for version control of ...


2

In my Brother's Keeper software there are several event fields which can be added to denote children or lack there of: Never married No children from this person No children from this marriage Number of children (person) Number of children (family) It comes in handy when printing reports with obituaries which list a current spouse plus children from ...


2

The way that I record such a person's name in an Ancestry online tree is: First and Middle Name: Harry William Last Name: Smith (Jones) - I place Jones in round brackets because it is a Last Name that he used (or was used for him) after the one given at birth/baptism. Suffix: "Buddy" - this field seems to get searched and to attract hints. Although this is ...


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