14

The chances he used the same spelling as "Jurkiewicz" anywhere in Russia, at least on official documents, are nearly exactly zero: Russia used (and still uses) the Cyrillic alphabet, not the Latin one. Now, modern Russian alphabet and mid-19th-century Russian alphabet differ quite a bit as well, in particular the letter "yat" was still wildly used, and both ...


14

One way to identify the spelling of a last name is to compare it with a list of common last names for that country. It's always possible that the last name is not common, or the family intentionally spelt it in a unusual way, but a list of common names will often help. For Poland, here's a ranked list of common last names in the 1990's. There's also a list ...


13

Née is used in French, and also in English, to describe a woman's last name (family name, surname) at birth. The more widely used term is her maiden name. Né, which is used much less often, indicates the birth last name of man, when his last name is now different. Most commonly, Née is used when a woman has changed her name due to marriage. But that is ...


12

Tentatively, those names do look rather Spanish, but that need not mean much. However, Wikipedia's page on Spanish naming conventions notes that: Currently in Spain, people bear a single or composite given name (nombre) and two surnames (apellidos). ... Traditionally, a person's first surname is the father's first surname (apellido paterno), and the ...


10

That Ellis Island changed immigrants' names is one of those family myths. Some people had altered their names prior to departure from Europe for various reasons and many more definitely changed their names after settling in their new residences. But it didn't happen at Ellis Island. Many immigration agents were immigrants themselves. Each person on staff ...


10

Née is an adjective, a loanword from French, Née is the past participle of *naître (to be born). There should be little opportunity for confusion with nee, the Dutch word for no. In English text, née introduces the birth name. Often used to introduce the maiden name of a married woman, it can also be used to introduce the birth name of a illegitimate child ...


9

You shouldn't look at the phenomenon as originally "a double surname", but rather as having several surnames. There are many ways and reasons for one to acquire a second or third surname. England was in many ways not that much different from the Continent, I believe. In Mediaeval times, one could, for example, be lord of both Aragon and Castile, and use the ...


9

If polish spelling rules are applied to "Ko lo jay" it'd look like Kolodżej. However, Kołodziej is more likely to be your answer as it is a real polish family name but it is NOT pronuced "Ko lo". But instead "Ko wo" with a soft ł, similar to the "W" in "Washington".


9

Ashkenazi Surnames really only came about in the early 1800s actually. The Jews of Western Europe (Germany, France, and England etc) took surnames sooner than their coreligionists in Eastern Europe. In fact, the Jews of Eastern Europe were only required to choose family names because of an edict from the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II after he had allowed Jews ...


8

Although it may seem otherwise when researching a family with a common name in a limited area, Anglo-Saxon full names (first and last) are surprisingly unique. It's statistically quite uncommon for two full names to be the same. US Death Data The Social Security Death Index (Death Master File) is a file of about 88 million people, a subset of those who ...


8

I have been a member of the Guild for ten years and have benefited hugely from my membership. These are what I see as some of the main benefits. You get a free profile page on the Guild website where you can advertise your one-name study. You can see my profile page here.Having a profile page brings in enquiries, and also gives your study more credibility. ...


8

Avvakum (Lat.: Abacuc, Ukr.: Аввакум, Grk.: Αμβακουμ) is a biblical name derived from the name of prophet Habakuk (ca. 612 BC). Also a notable person, protopope Avvakum Petrov (1620-1682) who led the opposition to Patriarch Nikon's reforms of the Russian Orthodox Church. Therefore, this name was popular among Old Believers (Ukr.: ...


7

Variations may include: Dubet, Dube, Dubée, Dubais, Dubaie, Dubey, Dubay, Dubbée, Dubbee, Dubbaie, Dubber, Dubbey, Dubbay, etc. These answers were borrowed from: http://www.houseofnames.com/dube-family-crest and http://www.houseofnames.com/fc.asp?s=dub%E9 You might also try looking up the variations on House of Names to see where that leads you. I have ...


7

At this time, there are three possible approaches to your issue of resolving the closeness of your relationship to your (presumed) cousin. Good old-fashioned detailed analysis and interpretation of the documentary records backwards through as many generations as is necessary for your particular circumstances. The grave disadvantage is that by the time you ...


7

In this case dit means alias. So Marie-Anne Romure was her given name but everyone knows her as Marie-Anne St Pierre and that is the name that she uses in every day life. There is a bit more information on this site that may help.


7

I think your "Lauraine" is Lausanne, which is a city in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. (There is also the French region of Lorraine, if someone's understanding of European geography was especially bad). Stukey may not have been the original European spelling - Geogen doesn't find any matches in current German-language telephone directories. However Stuckey ...


7

If you're trying to guess a proper spelling of a Polish surname, there are two useful resources to look at. The more reliable is the PESEL database, which contains data about every living Polish national. Current data is confidential (there's a statistical summary available, but that only lists top 100 names), but there's an export from the '90 available. ...


7

It could be 'Szemiński' (that's male form, female would be 'Szemińska') but that's quite an approximate guess. Things to consider is that 19th Century Warsaw had at different times, Prussian, Polish, Russian and again Polish local administration which along with it had different language and spellings. Also for consideration Warsaw at the time had only ...


7

I am sure there are lots of benefits to being a member of any society and there are sometimes various options. For example, Somerset & Dorset FHS exists, as do the separate county FHS groups. As Colin mentioned, there are two societies who serve the surname study communities. Some people choose to do their studies in isolation and want to be the sole ...


7

"i" means "and". They both were Catalan. Nowadays in Catalunya we still use both family names but only a few still use the conjunction "i" between them. Becouse of globalization it starts to be common to use only our first name. But our ID card has the two names. http://ca.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onom%C3%A0stica_jueva is a link to the wiki talking about the ...


7

Version 1, derived from сипати I found a linguistics professor in an Ukrainian university whose name is Liliya Sypa (Ukr: Сипа), and she helped to reveal the etymology of her name. The main version is based on Ukrainian/Russian root сипати (/'sɪpatɪ/) which means "to pour" (referring a granular solid only; we have a different verb in meaning "to pour a ...


7

There is no correct spelling of your surname. Sure, there is now. It's Wasmanski. Unless one of your modern-day relatives spell it differently, and they might. It is possible your current spelling is a change from another established spelling. It is possible the other spelling is a mistake (also be sure you're looking at the original document and not a ...


7

As it is a patronymically derived name ..."Robin's son", the likelihood of there being any single attributable geographic origin is very unlikely. Surname distribution maps derived from census information will show if it is more common in specific areas. The 1881 distribution data (http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/) would certainly seem to support your ...


7

I suggest you obtain a copy of Winifred's birth certificate. It can be ordered from the GRO website. In the New GRO index, here is her entry: As you can see, the Mother's maiden surname is given as a dash, indicating she was very likely illegitimate. The most likely explanation is that Winifred's mother was unmarried when Winifred was born. Whether Edward ...


6

The basic premise in family history is to start with what you know, and work backwards and outwards from that point in small increments to discover more. You want to be able to say with confidence, when you recognize a record associated with your relative, that you are looking at something that was recorded about your relative and not someone else with the ...


6

For an 'out of the box' answer -- one of the more interesting blog posts I've come across recently is from Kenneth Marks' site The Ancestor Hunt where he offers a series of lessons on how to do newspaper research, including 8 Ways to Overcome OCR Errors when Searching Newspapers. Unlike Soundex, he focuses on substituting letters which have the same shapes ...


6

I just checked Wikipedia and found that Wozniak is the "tenth most common surname in Poland (89,015 people in 2009)" and, as a result, I suspect you will find people of that name (and its variants) spread all over Poland. Consequently, there will be a vast number of potential resources that you could use to try and trace people with this name (and its ...


6

Surname derivation from the Angle tribe, once based in northern Germany, is unlikely. The highest concentration of Angloher residents of Germany per Geogen is in south-east Bavaria, near the Austrian border. An origin in local vocabulary is most likely. The word ending "er" implies belonging to or having connections to something or somewhere. As it happens, ...


6

Other answers have already confirmed that those are clearly Catalan surnames, although they are not very common - in fact, surnames of Catalan origin are very diverse, so they tend to be rare. I can confirm that "i" is just the conjunction "and" that is placed between paternal (first) and maternal (second) surnames in formal contexts. Here is some ...


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