5

I think the Act that you are looking for is probably An Act further to provide for the Occupant Settlers, south and west of the congressional reservation line, and for other purposes, which was passed by the General Assembly on November 2 1847. The full text of the Act can be found in Acts of the state of Tennessee passed by the General Assembly, for the ...


5

Try to look on this problem as an opportunity for learning something new instead of a roadblock to overcome. You can't find your person in the 1840 Census because it doesn't list him by name -- but what did you hope to gain by finding that record? Is the information in other records, or can you learn what you want to know by combining the information found ...


4

ALLIE TOMAS RUSSELL was born at 32 Hazel Street in Nashville, Tennessee (Ward 15) on 29 Feb 1892, son of THOMAS TALLIAFERRO RUSSELL and IDA CLIFTON RUSSELL. He and his mother have several photos on Ancestry.com's public tree and have been well sourced. His Russell line appears to go back to the 1400's. He is listed as Ale, Allie, and Allen in several ...


4

When you find yourself saying "help! I don't know anything! I can't find anything!" it can help to write out everything that you do know, and how you know it, and then to put all those bits and pieces into a timeline about the person. Imagine you have an assignment to write a short biographical sketch, as if you were writing the person's obituary. Make an ...


3

What a great opportunity for you. I would suggest the county recorders office for land records, and many other kinds of documents such as tax liens, some types of business documents, and mortgages. Also check with the county level courts for civil, and criminal court records. Life happens, when it does it usually leaves a paper trail. These types of records ...


3

Just adding one detail to Jan Murphy's extremely thorough research guide, I think it's worth specifically mentioning probate records and deeds. Although not electronically indexed, FamilySearch's Tennessee probate records include Greene County wills starting in 1828 (and apparently some back to 1810). Will book #1 includes wills for a John Harmon (filed Nov ...


3

Marriage index Cooke County, Texas, lists her as A. N. Priddy. Tombstone says A. N. Gilbreath. Could Nettie be short for Annette, Antoinette, or Anita? Marriage of son James says mother was Nettie Pretty born in Brandon, Texas. Death Certificate of son Thomas says mother was Preddy born in Texas. Death certificate of son George says mother was Alice ...


3

Taking a look at the 1910 Census Image clears up some of the mystery. Frank Dennis occupation is Superintendent of County Poor Farm, not private farm. This in confirmed in the far left column where the address is listed as Poor House. That might explain the need for approval from Mr. Dennis. The first names following the Cantrell farm are Wilson's, so if ...


2

Underneath the search box for the database Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 on Ancestry, the section About Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 says: Marriage Bonds: Bonds were posted prior to the issuing of the required marriage licenses in some states and were the sole documents required in others. Bonds were posted by the groom alone or ...


2

Yes, the information provided on the document suggests that John was probably illegitimate. However, don't assume anything. The only way to verify whether this is true is by finding additional evidence. The informant's name appears to be Cordell P. Tindell, and you can verify this by using other resources such as census records.


2

I'm not sure this is an answer, but it's too long for a comment, and it may be helpful in suggesting some ideas for research. Bethel College is now Bethel University, and has moved from its founding location in McLemoresville, Carroll County, Tennessee, to McKenzie, Tennessee, which is at the point where Carroll, Henry, and Weakley Counties meet. According ...


2

I have an account over at ancestry.com: I entered the information you provided, and up came the following result: You might consider signing up on ancestry.com and beginning that amazing journey. It can be a great deal of hard work, but it is so rewarding. You have a great connection to your heritage, just in the search for this one person!


1

The county historical society in my hometown may be unique (and it's not in Tennessee), but they keep an index of local obituaries and their associated publication dates in the local newspapers, which are on microfilm, and a file cabinet of funeral cards that have been collected or donated over the years. They also have various "History of (Town)" books ...


1

I would look for death certificates. They can reveal quite a bit of detail and if you're in the right place (right county), you might be able to look at a lot of family members at once.


1

Your best bet to get the records from the State of Tennessee and circumvent the 100 year rule is find a direct descendant of hers and ask that person to submit a letter requesting records you have written on his behalf. Then ask him to forward the response once he receives it. If there is a money necessary prepay him (and round up $10+) I have had to do that ...


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