8 votes
Accepted

How to interpret "in descent from"

The phrase "9th in descent from Edward I" means that Edward I appears 8 lines above her in her pedigree (i.e. Edward I was her 6x Gt Grandfather). What follows is a little complicated, but the lines: ...
  • 5,166
7 votes
Accepted

1882 Local News Item -- What Does "in the shade" Mean?

What an interestingly-written column… A fairly quick search for "laid in the shade" doesn't bring much up. The common result is the literal interpretation of people or animals taking shelter from the ...
  • 4,417
7 votes
Accepted

What does 'DD' mean in a name on GEDmatch.com?

The "DD"-prefix simply means that they're a member of the Facebook group "DNA Detectives". It's a Facebook group for people who use DNA genealogy to track down family members. If you're on Facebook, ...
  • 5,166
6 votes

How do we properly use née for given names?

It is not an uncommon occurrence in my family tree to find a person whose birth certificate contains a name they never used in their life. In my family tree, I have a set of triplets whose births were ...
  • 18.6k
6 votes
Accepted

What does "care of" mean in the 18th century with respect to letters?

The date of your notice is critical. USPS Publication 100, The United States Postal Service An American History 1775-200 describes the early days of the Postal Service. Mail was delivered on post ...
  • 24.4k
5 votes

Could "Our Mother" be a term of endearment on 1855 headstone?

My initial assessment is: I think it quite unlikely that someone would be referred to "Our Mother" on a headstone, without some mother-child relationship present. It may not be a genetic mother-child ...
  • 18.6k
5 votes

What is sibling of son-in-law or daughter-in-law called?

With respect to Dohnanyi, Dietrich Bonhoeffer could be referred to as: His son's wife's brother (for most detail), His son's brother-in-law, or His daughter-in-law's brother. Relatives through ...
  • 16.5k
4 votes

Meaning of term "died leaving with other issue"?

It simply means the person had other children. The Legal Dictionary for the term issue states: 1) n. a person's children or other lineal descendants such as grandchildren and great-grandchildren....
  • 18.6k
4 votes

Seeking Notation for common ancestors across different family branches?

I haven't seen such terminology. But I needed something similar, mainly to define DNA relationships, so I developed a notation I call: Behold's Genetic Relationship Notation (BGRN). You can ...
  • 16.5k
4 votes
Accepted

Definition of profession: coasterman

The letter combination that you read as 'st' in the occupation doesn't appear to match the 'st' combination in the adjacent word "Resturant" [sic]. I wondered, therefore whether the word ...
  • 5,166
3 votes
Accepted

Term for researching one's own life in detail?

"Autobiographer" is a good and descriptive term for the person who's doing the activity described in the question. Collecting dates, documents etc. is kind of "collecting material for one's ...
  • 139
3 votes

What is difference between city, town, village, and township in Wisconsin?

This is a special case of the problem discussed in the question Should I use the modern (what it is called now) or historical (what it was called) place name? -- the answers there may give some ...
  • 24.4k
3 votes

Seeking Notation for common ancestors across different family branches?

My understanding is that if there are two ways for one person to be related to another, then that is called a double relationship. To determine what each of the two individual relationships may be ...
  • 11k
3 votes

How do we properly use née for given names?

I think that the implied sub-text here is that there is a correct way of using terminology. In my personal view, language changes and so there often isn't such a view. If it's a technical term, ...
  • 11.3k
3 votes

How do we properly use née for given names?

I am not certain that it is appropriate to use née in this way. Both Merriam-Webster.com and TheFreeDictionary.com seem to say that née is primarily: Used to indicate the maiden name of a married ...
  • 11k
2 votes
Accepted

Is Xmas 24th a common way to refer to 24th December (Christmas Eve)?

Yes, I have seen dates such as Xmas 24TH & New Year 30TH. Mainly people from the Philippines, Caribbean, and South America, but it pops up closer to my home in Northern Kentucky/Southern Ohio, too....
2 votes

Meaning of term "Alias" in 1861 Lincolnshire parish baptism record?

As I understand it an "alias" in a parish register means exactly what you would expect it to mean - that the person is commonly known by more than one name. It's relatively unusual to see it in a ...
  • 4,333
2 votes
Accepted

What is the English equivalent to the German term “Spitzenahn”?

There is no direct equivalent of Spitzenahnen in English; a literal translation would be peak-ancestors or point-ancestors. There are a number of phrases used in genealogy literature and software that ...
  • 7,926
2 votes

How do we properly use née for given names?

It is quite common in Dutch Genealogy for someone to have a "roepnaam", which literally translates as "call name", i.e. what people generally call you, a bit equivalent to a nick name but it tends to ...
  • 241
2 votes

What is the English equivalent to the German term “Spitzenahn”?

I just found a webpage from Legacy Family Tree that refers to them as end-of-line ancestors and it seems to have a function to find them: End-of-line ancestors. We all have them. We think about ...
  • 11k
2 votes

Seeking Notation for common ancestors across different family branches?

I'm going to attempt to answer my own question to get comments and feedback on the solution I have been thinking of. NOTE: this system would be based on the entire family tree currently being ...
2 votes

What is difference between city, town, village, and township in Wisconsin?

The Administrative divisions of Wisconsin page in Wikipedia says (with my bolding): The administrative divisions of Wisconsin include counties, cities, villages and towns. In Wisconsin, all of ...
  • 11k
1 vote

Understanding BWD Acronym in genealogy diagrams?

On some pedigree charts it can stand for b(orn), w(here born), d(ied): The M on the record numbered 50 stands for m(arried). The idea is that you record the dates next to the b, m, and d, and the ...
  • 5,166
1 vote

How do we properly use née for given names?

This discussion reminded me of a wonderful informative discussion about names that is relevant to all genealogists: http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/ ...
1 vote

What is the English equivalent to the German term “Spitzenahn”?

Per Google Translate "Spitzenahnen" is "Patriarch". So for example: http://www.genealogie-kosma.de/html/spitzenahnen.html Spitzenahnen sind die jeweils ältesten Vorfahren in einer Ahnenreihe, ...
  • 5,531
1 vote

What does the Anglican church terminology in this document mean?

Great question. Anglican Church structure is ancient and bewildering. A lot is shared with Catholic structure. It's important for genealogists because many personal records (birth, death, marriage) ...
  • 11
1 vote

What is the meaning of "Bound To" in this 18th Century US (Virginia) Will?

The guesswork can be eliminated by using other sources. For example, the Bute County, North Carolina Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1767-1779 makes the meaning of the bond very ...
  • 18.6k
1 vote

What is the meaning of "Bound To" in this 18th Century US (Virginia) Will?

Searching the online edition of Black's Law Dictionary for the phrase "bound to" resulted in the definition for BOUND: As an adjective, denotes the condition of being constrained by the ...
  • 24.4k

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