8

The phrase "9th in descent from Edward I" means that Edward I appears 8 lines above her in her pedigree (i.e. Edward I was her 6x Gt Grandfather). What follows is a little complicated, but the lines: "via Clare, le Despencer, Berkeley, and Dennis" "Segrave, Mowbray, Berkeley, and Dennis" and "Bohun, FitzAlan, Mowbray, Berkeley, and Dennis" are ...


7

What an interestingly-written column… A fairly quick search for "laid in the shade" doesn't bring much up. The common result is the literal interpretation of people or animals taking shelter from the sun. Not something one would typically announce in a newspaper. A second result, exemplified by the Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs by J J Hooper (1845), and ...


7

The "DD"-prefix simply means that they're a member of the Facebook group "DNA Detectives". It's a Facebook group for people who use DNA genealogy to track down family members. If you're on Facebook, and join that group you can contact the person using the prefix who might then be able to help with your research. There's a handy little Genetic Genealogy ...


6

It is not an uncommon occurrence in my family tree to find a person whose birth certificate contains a name they never used in their life. In my family tree, I have a set of triplets whose births were registered as Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Within two weeks their parents saw reason and they were christened William, Albert, and Percy, the names which – ...


6

The date of your notice is critical. USPS Publication 100, The United States Postal Service An American History 1775-200 describes the early days of the Postal Service. Mail was delivered on post roads by stagecoach, and sometimes by riders: In 1781, Congress ratified the Articles of Confederation. Article IX addressed postal issues: The United ...


5

My initial assessment is: I think it quite unlikely that someone would be referred to "Our Mother" on a headstone, without some mother-child relationship present. It may not be a genetic mother-child relationship, but consider whether Harriet may be a step-mother, or grandmother. The odds of two English women who bore the same relatively uncommon surname ...


5

With respect to Dohnanyi, Dietrich Bonhoeffer could be referred to as: His son's wife's brother (for most detail), His son's brother-in-law, or His daughter-in-law's brother. Relatives through marriage are generally known as "affines" or "in-laws", and only the close relationships have a specific term. This is only for English. There may be one or more ...


4

It simply means the person had other children. The Legal Dictionary for the term issue states: 1) n. a person's children or other lineal descendants such as grandchildren and great-grandchildren. It does not mean all heirs, but only the direct bloodline. Occasionally, there is a problem in determining whether a writer of a will or deed meant issue ...


4

I haven't seen such terminology. But I needed something similar, mainly to define DNA relationships, so I developed a notation I call: Behold's Genetic Relationship Notation (BGRN). You can develop relationships in words from the notation, e.g.: Y- = Male person’s spouse Y-(YX)xaY = Male person’s spouse’s sister’s adopted child’s father. XXXX–x-X- = ...


3

This is a special case of the problem discussed in the question Should I use the modern (what it is called now) or historical (what it was called) place name? -- the answers there may give some insight into why you are having difficulty. Modern software gives us an incentive to standardize place names in our database, perhaps to make use of mapping ...


3

I think that the implied sub-text here is that there is a correct way of using terminology. In my personal view, language changes and so there often isn't such a view. If it's a technical term, defined in law, say, we need to be careful / critical about changing it but otherwise, I think we simply need to ask whether the altered meaning is contradictory or ...


3

I am not certain that it is appropriate to use née in this way. Both Merriam-Webster.com and TheFreeDictionary.com seem to say that née is primarily: Used to indicate the maiden name of a married woman. but its other meaning may leave scope for you to use it as you have: Formerly known as In any event I would name your mother as: Rebecca "Rita" ...


3

My understanding is that if there are two ways for one person to be related to another, then that is called a double relationship. To determine what each of the two individual relationships may be called we have a Q&A here that can be used: Seeking English term for relationship between two members of extended family? The other Q&A here that I think ...


3

If you search for the words "orphan" and "bound to" in Google Books, you will find extracts like the following from http://books.google.com.au/books?id=xxdZK9jPRdwC&pg=PA144&lpg=PA144 The connection to apprenticeship is quite clear; although the notion of a legally binding obligation can exist in other settings.


3

"Autobiographer" is a good and descriptive term for the person who's doing the activity described in the question. Collecting dates, documents etc. is kind of "collecting material for one's autobiography" although nothing is published yet (or even never will be) I answered to my own question but it was rephrased from comments by @bgviehle and @PolyGeo.


2

I think it may possibly mean bound to John Hicks as an apprentice. The term "bound to" is often used in relation to apprenticeships, and I don't recollect seeing it in any other fashion (which doesn't mean it isn't used in any other way) and that apprenticing orphans to someone was a typical thing to happen in this era to ensure they were looked after.


2

There is no direct equivalent of Spitzenahnen in English; a literal translation would be peak-ancestors or point-ancestors. There are a number of phrases used in genealogy literature and software that are often used in the same way: end-of-line ancestors brick wall ancestors family founders / founding fathers patriarchs / matriarchs immigrant ancestors (...


2

I'm going to attempt to answer my own question to get comments and feedback on the solution I have been thinking of. NOTE: this system would be based on the entire family tree currently being worked on. it would only show that an ancestor/individual had multiple different descending branches that connected at a later date It wouldn't be specific to a ...


2

Yes, I have seen dates such as Xmas 24TH & New Year 30TH. Mainly people from the Philippines, Caribbean, and South America, but it pops up closer to my home in Northern Kentucky/Southern Ohio, too. It may have been started by the missionaries to help translate that Christmas EVENING is an entire day, and lasts all morning, noon, and evening of the 24th. ...


2

As I understand it an "alias" in a parish register means exactly what you would expect it to mean - that the person is commonly known by more than one name. It's relatively unusual to see it in a register that late - it's more common in earlier ones though I'm not really sure why, or what might typically cause a person to be known by more than one name.


2

The Administrative divisions of Wisconsin page in Wikipedia says (with my bolding): The administrative divisions of Wisconsin include counties, cities, villages and towns. In Wisconsin, all of these are units of general-purpose local government. and In Wisconsin, a city is an autonomous incorporated area within one or more counties. It provides ...


2

It is quite common in Dutch Genealogy for someone to have a "roepnaam", which literally translates as "call name", i.e. what people generally call you, a bit equivalent to a nick name but it tends to be used by everyone, not just close friends for a nickname. See "Roepnaam" — a good Dutch word I usually indicate that this by placing that name in round ...


2

I just found a webpage from Legacy Family Tree that refers to them as end-of-line ancestors and it seems to have a function to find them: End-of-line ancestors. We all have them. We think about them. We study them. We even dream about them. Once we find their parents, we do a quick Genealogy Happy Dance, and then it starts over again - we now have ...


1

On some pedigree charts it can stand for b(orn), w(here born), d(ied): The M on the record numbered 50 stands for m(arried). The idea is that you record the dates next to the b, m, and d, and the place where it happened next to the w. The columns further to the left of the chart have more space allowing you to record the location for all the events:


1

This discussion reminded me of a wonderful informative discussion about names that is relevant to all genealogists: http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/ WRT this example I do not believe that it's (culturally) appropriate to use née. Rather I think the right thing (TM) to do is to use Rita Lerner and have an "...


1

Great question. Anglican Church structure is ancient and bewildering. A lot is shared with Catholic structure. It's important for genealogists because many personal records (birth, death, marriage) were kept by the parish church and not the state prior to the 19th C, unless legal actions (land, tax, crime) were involved. Parish is geographical territory, ...


1

Per Google Translate "Spitzenahnen" is "Patriarch". So for example: http://www.genealogie-kosma.de/html/spitzenahnen.html Spitzenahnen sind die jeweils ältesten Vorfahren in einer Ahnenreihe, zu denen Daten für die Eltern fehlen. Ein Familienforscher, der seine Vorfahren einschließlich der Ururgroßeltern vollständig (aber auch nicht darüber hinaus) ...


1

Any source of information can be considered evidence, however, some evidence is false and some is true. Ideally we are always looking for multiple independently derived sources written by persons who have direct knowledge of the claims being made. Also ideally, you would not enter a claim into your database unless you had at least one source of evidence. You ...


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