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6

Since you are accessing the database Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997 on Ancestry.com, look the database up in the Card Catalog. Under the section About Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997 there is a description of the database, which includes the county codes. County 57 is Dallas County. FamilySearch has a collection Texas, Birth Index, 1903-1997 which is described ...


5

I found a source for these using Google to search "texas county code numbers". They seem to come from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and 057 matches Dallas county there. The codes there match those from the Texas Department of State Health Services which makes them available as an Excel spreadsheet for download and says: The county FIPS (...


4

The present picture is hardly crisp, but we can compare the two car photos at similar scales: There are certainly some consistencies between the two cars, notably the shade/flap above the windscreen, the wheels and arches, and possibly the door hinges. Nothing absolutely conclusive, but they look pretty similar to me, and could be the same car. I can't ...


4

This appears to be a Ford Model T Coupe, produced from 1917-1927 Looking through some various model year images here, seems to narrow it to 1923-25 by location of the hinges and how the door swings. Before 1923 the door hinges appear to be located on the other side of the door, with the handle near the window edge. The 1924 model seems to show the raised ...


4

The car seems most likely to be an early-1940s model Chevy or Plymouth Coupe. The third picture is not the same car; it's a 1920s sedan style. The man's shoes are two-tone style that might be a Spectator shoe which apparently had a long fashion run so may not be too helpful.


4

That jacket is very much like this stable jacket in the British National Army Museum described here and the stable jacket of the Fife and Forfar Imperial Yeomanry shown here. It says in the description of the jacket that it "was often donned by cavalry officers during service overseas". Maybe that is why it appears in a portrait in Texas?


4

The gun looks like a shotgun rather than a rifle. It could be a model 97 (1897) Winchester shotgun. And, that is a Model T Ford. The model T began production in 1909. So, the photo can't be older than that. The production of the model T peaked in the 1920s, so that seems likely, although they were popular for decades. It's possible a model T expert could ...


4

The skirt length alone rules out 1912. It is consistent with 1942. As are the other clothes. Remember that people usually did not wear the latest fashions, especially away from large cities and if they were not wealthy. They often wore the same well-kept clothes for many years, updating as needed.


3

The railroad started service in Mertzon in 1911. So that's the oldest your station can be (give or take a couple of years). Your goal now is to find out when it was actually built and if it was rebuilt. Years other features were added. And also see if you can find pictures of it at various times and compare the wear. Turns out part of it was rebuilt. ...


3

I found the page here: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-27818-9190-18?cc=2000219 By using this tool: http://stevemorse.org/census/unified.html To look up the address of University Blvd. in the county of Dallas and city of University Park (not Dallas) which has the University Blvd listed. I then entered the cross streets by looking up the ...


2

The primary newspaper for Midland, Texas, is the Midland Reporter-Telegram (found by searching for "newspaper" on the "Midland, Texas" wikipedia page). Google "midland reporter telegram archives" and one of the top hits is "Midland Reporter Telegram Newspaper Archives (1941-1977)


2

You can download a copy of the 1940 Instructions to Enumerators from the US Census Bureau. Students are discussed on page 16, under Persons Not to Be Enumerated in Your District: e. Students or children living or boarding with this household in order to attend some school, college, or other education in the locality, but who have a usual place of ...


2

Many people will search for records by name first, and will find obituaries using newspaper subscription sites genealogy databases, like Ancestry & FamilySearch, which have obituary indexes, and may link to the to actual text Find-a-Grave and online family trees, where someone has attached the obituary But that's a minority of what's available. Let's ...


1

This was common is certain areas of Europe where Jews were charged extra taxes to get married under civil law, but I haven't heard of this being prevalent in the US. I would assume in the US their marriage would be registered in city or state records, but of course you'd need to know which city or state to check.


1

I would assume the answer was "yes" until I found out otherwise. The FamilySearch Wiki article about Texas Vital Records says: From 1837 to 1966, the county recorders issued marriage licenses and kept marriage registers. Copies of the records can be obtained by writing to the clerk of the county where the license was issued. For information ...


1

I am not qualified or willing to give any legal advice but I found a website called TexasLawHelp.org that seems to describe the process: Adult Name Change Forms and Instructions in English and Spanish Read this step by step brochure if you are changing the name of an adult in Texas I very much like the idea of people adopting or being given names ...


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