5

Regarding "maybe it means that he served it and came back", The Victorian Crime and Punishment site notes that: "there was no procedure for return after the sentence expired" "Only a handful ever came back to Britain". Wikipedia also states that a released convict "had to make his own way back", which would presumably be unaffordable for most ex-cons. ...


3

This is a suggestion for further research, so it will by necessity be a stub of an answer. My plan would be to set the records aside for a period of time, and then review all the collected material as a group -- and here's the important part -- with the assumption that each record belongs to a different George Wills until you have information that suggests ...


3

Carl Rogerson put together a series of "Stage-Coach Timetables in 1830's Cheshire". The warning here is that most people could not afford stage-coach travel. In fact, I think we underestimate people's walking abilities. A journal of a Nantwich shoe-maker(?) shows that one day he walked from Nantwich to Chester to hear a court case (nearly 20 miles) and back ...


2

While browsing John Marius Wilson's 1872 The Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales, which is available as a searchable database on Ancestry.com, I saw several references to the branch railways in South Devon; many entries had information on the dates the lines were established and the terminus of the lines. Then I wondered if I could find maps for the ...


1

You don't say what strategies you've already tried, so I'll start with some general advice for finding passenger lists for incoming arrivals and immigrant origins. Before you start your research, review all the records you've found in the US so far. You might find clues about the arrival or place of origin for your immigrants in records like naturalization ...


1

The answer by @AndyW mentions that the George Wills imprisoned at Bodmin, who was also transported to Bermuda, had siblings named Jane, Thomas and Mary, and also a brother-in-law Thomas Adams. I am confident that I have now identified that family, and that my 3rd great grandfather George Wills is a different man. This appears to be the birth family of ...


1

If we accept the assumption that all four references are to the same person (and I would like to see stronger evidence of that) then there are grounds for believing that the man in question was an habitual criminal. It is quite feasible that, at some time between the reprieve and the scheduled date of departure, he committed a further offence while being ...


1

Esther Emma Leach's father was a convict, John Woods alias Leach, who was transported for life for stealing a watch. He arrived in Sydney in Oct 1812 on the Earl Spencer. Despite receiving many Ticket of Leaves, he always re-offended and was sent to Morton Bay Penal Colony in 1834. He eventually obtained his conditional pardon in April 1847 and it is here ...


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