15

It says "Leeds in the County of York"


12

Very simply, an illegitimate child whose father did not consent to being included on the certificate (from 1875, if the child was illegitimate the father had to be present at the birth registration to be named; before that the mother could name a father but it wasn't verified), or an illegitimate child whose father was 'unknown' would not have a father's ...


10

As @TomH indirectly suggests, it is possible to request your father's Service Records from the UK's Ministry of Defence. See https://www.gov.uk/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records, in particular the section "Service records of deceased Service personnel". Obtaining Service Records has a bad reputation because of the time it takes and the ...


9

There is a set of research guides produced by the UK's National Archives (TNA). The guides you need are accessible from the "Looking for a Person" page - right-hand column, look for "Criminals, bankrupts and litigants". Essentially, the location of any surviving records will depend on what level John Edmonds was tried at. TNA at Kew holds the higher levels ...


7

Ancestry has "UK, Navy Lists, 1888-1970" - these include "multiple volumes of the Navy List, the Royal Navy’s official published list of officers." There are 4 records for your father (1941, 42, 44 and 1945 - I'd guess he's in the 1943 as well but it's not indexed?) p.1639 of Volume II of the July 1945 list (I don't know how often the paper versions were ...


7

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (https://genealogy.org.il) is in the process of indexing marriage and divorce records from the British Mandate period. You can search their database and see all the information for free, but it requires one to register on their site first. Viewing the actual marriage certificate requires membership in the ...


7

There is no such thing as a UK death certificate This question highlights a common misconception that the UK is more or less equivalent to England, but for genealogical purposes it is important to recognize the distinction. In 1908, the UK was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, thus comprised of 4 countries: England, Wales, Scotland, and ...


7

Chemist is one of those occupations that has several meanings, each of which brings another web of meanings and qualifications. From what you say, my initial suggestion would be that she worked in a chemist's shop. (Chemist = Pharmacist ). Since my GGF Bruce did similar, I can confirm that in the 1920s it was just about possible to do that without formal ...


7

There would be no requirement to produce a birth certificate to get married (and still isn't -although you do now need to produce some proof of identity- most use a passport). Likewise there is no need to have a birth certificate to vote now, so unlikely to have been necessary at any time. The rate of non-registration of births was quite low by the time ...


6

Yesterday, online records related to the Kindertransport children became available through FindMyPast: This is a fascinating collection of digitised government documents relating to the Kindertransport operation, dating from 1939 to 1945, held by The National Archives. The records may reveal when and where your ancestor arrived in Britain. This is ...


6

Kew's recommendations for citing their documents are on the page "Citing documents in The National Archives". In particular, they say: "In long full citation one of the following will suffice: "The National Archives (TNA) "The National Archives of the UK (TNA)" Anyone who read that page some time ago, may remember references to additionally citing the ...


6

I have been trying to check up on one of my Army pensioners (Private Samuel Bateman, 834, 49th Regiment of Foot) - he is recorded as 2y 10m on "China / Eastern Expedition" (the embarrassing-to-us-now First Opium War). The 49th were in India before sailing for China - there are separate accounts of the 49th's history in that campaign These have "India, ...


6

It's very common for at least one child to have the mother's maiden name as a middle - it's a way of preserving a name that might otherwise be lost. I can't see I've ever seen a case where quite so many children have been given their mother's maiden name as a middle name before though! It can certainly be very useful in confirming that you've got the right ...


6

It's simply a way of distinguising households/institutions. According to the National Archives Information is arranged by: enumeration district – each enumeration district has a unique four- or five-letter code, and large enumeration districts may comprise more than one book household or institution – each household or institution is ...


6

You may be looking for Guilthwaite. From Wikipedia: Guilthwaite is a hamlet in the civil parish of Whiston, in the Rotherham district lying to the south of Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. Whiston stands to the north of the hamlet with Ulley, and Morthen to the east, Treeton to the west and Aughton to the south. I was not able to find Gilford, Gillford,...


5

The (US) National Archives does have a guide to Citing Records in the National Archives of the United States (pdf). For paper documents, they expect you to mention which regional building it is in, and for electronic documents it should be "National Archives and Records Administration" (NARA). Having said that, they call themselves "US National Archives" ...


5

A search of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission grave locator for service members from WW2 who served with the Lancashire Fusiliers with a rank of Corporal yields 103 records. If your granddad is in the database, having his military service number would help you distinguish his entry from another service member with the same name. Do you have any ...


5

One place you could start is with TNA's research guide on How to Look for Courts martial and desertion in the British Army 17th-20th centuries (tip courtesy of David Underdown on Twitter). Make a timeline of the events, combining the entries from the Service at Home and Abroad page: and the page Statement of the Services which you've posted above: ...


5

An England & Wales Death Certificate ordered from the General Register Office will contain a scanned image of the registrars written transcript. In more or less the same format as a Birth Certificate from the same period. The fields on an England & Wales Death Certificate from 1908 would have: 'No.' (The Reference Number) 'When and where died' (An ...


5

The informant on a death certificate has to be legally "qualified" to give the information. There is an order of precedence for qualification starting with a family relative, but can also, in a case like this, include the person in charge of the premises where the death took place. As you only want a certificate issued if a family member is the informant, ...


5

One thing to bear in mind is that from 1904 onwards certificates tend to use euphemistic addresses for workhouses. As http://workhouses.org.uk/addresses/ explains the Registrar General directed that an "ordinary street address" be used. Initially that was only for births, and deaths only officially used the same addresses from 1920 onwards, but in practice ...


5

As already noted, a chemist could have been pretty much anyone preparing or dispensing pharmaceuticals or other preparations. The Royal Pharmaceutical Society has kept a register of chemists, druggists and pharmacists since 1868. They have the registers at their library in London, and can also run a paid-for search for you: http://www.rpharms.com/museum-...


5

Which county? I would suggest that deciding to align to what 'typical genealogists' do is not a good idea if it works counter to (a) your software or (b) your immediate intended audience. (Emphasis on 'immediate' audience as our total intended audience should surely be anyone and everyone - however, surely we should prioritise?). If your software allows ...


5

These are reasonable assumptions, but not concrete proof. I have not looked at the Worcestershire Regiment before but the battalion structure for WW1 is given on The Long Long Trail. There appear to be 4 Regular battalions (1st thru 4th), 2 (original) Territorial Battalions (7th and 8th) and then 2 Reserve Bns (5th & 6th). These were then supplemented ...


5

There are naturalisation case papers at The National Archives for an Isaac Gabriel of Woolwich dated 1882 which seem likely to be for the same man. Those should give some background about him and his birthplace/parents: Nationality and Naturalisation: Isaac Gabriel. From Russia. Resident in Woolwich.... TNA reference - HO 144/94/A13526 Naturalisation ...


5

Women's entitlement to vote began with the Representation of the People Act 1918. That allowed women over 30 years old, with certain other qualifications such as property ownership, to vote in the General Election. A PDF of the Act is available at legislation.gov.uk. It's lengthy, and seems slightly vague on exactly how someone would end up on the register....


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