10

This answer is based on my experience with English probate records. While the probate process in the British colonies differed from that of the colonial power, the process was no doubt modelled on its British counterpart. In England, it was customary for the testator to mention all his children in his will such that it was clear that none had been forgotten....


9

I may be stating the obvious here, but as the etymology of this abbreviation is not covered in PolyGeo's answer: Xember and its associated abbreviations are using X, the Roman numeral 10, to represent the 10th month. Under the old style (Julian) calendar used in Britain and its colonies until 1752, the first month was March, making December the 10th month. ...


7

The third column is the "Rate / acre" amount in shillings and pence. (e.g. 10/ is 10 shillings and 0 pence. 7/6 would be 7 shillings and 6 pence ...) There were 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings in a pound. For the first row, the rate is 10 shillings per acre on 100 acres = 1000 shillings = £60 For the second row, the rate is 4 shillings / acre ...


7

To be more confident that "Xemb. means December" (which I suspect it probably does) you could look at slightly earlier entries in the same set of records for abbreviations like VIIemb., VIIIob./VIIIemb. and IXemb. (for September, October and November). I found a Princeton University Abbreviations of the Names of the Months page that lists abbreviations for ...


7

The word is 'List'. As far as I can make out,the name preceding the word List is that of the 'Master' and the names that follow are those of their household, slaves or servants. So, for the extracts in your question, we have: First image: Mary Clay's List ... Second image: John Sturdivant's List ... Third image: Obadiah Smith's List ...


6

The date of your notice is critical. USPS Publication 100, The United States Postal Service An American History 1775-200 describes the early days of the Postal Service. Mail was delivered on post roads by stagecoach, and sometimes by riders: In 1781, Congress ratified the Articles of Confederation. Article IX addressed postal issues: The United ...


6

I think it reads Parmenus. Parmenas is a rare biblical name of Greek origin, referring to one of the seven men appointed to care for the poor of Jerusalem. Specifically, he was mentioned in Acts 6:5: And the saying pleased the whole multitude: and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost, and Philip, and Prochorus, and Nicanor, ...


5

Let's look at the nature of the source first, using the Evidence Analysis Process Map, keeping in mind the elements of the Genealogical Proof Standard and other good genealogical practices. On the EE website, in the discussion Citing transcribed records - document or database in the Citation issues forum, Elizabeth Shown Mills talks about the problem of how ...


4

I think Stella Pickett Hardy, wife of Joseph Zachary Taylor, is either the figment of someone's imagination, or – more likely – due to a computer ineptitude that resulted in an author for a source being entered as a wife. Sadly these errors are perpetuated on online trees by nonchalant copying-and-pasting, to a degree that it seems to the casual reader that ...


4

A godson does not have to be any relation at all to his godparents, and often is not. I would think a godson is unlikely to also be a son-in-law, given godparents are named at the time of baptism (usually in infancy), and it would be a bit coincidental for the father of his future wife to be present. Given the information given here, my guess would be that ...


3

You can find Cavaliers and Pioneers : Vol. 2 1666-1695 Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents in a library near you by looking on Worldcat.org. After that, you can use research guides such as the FamilySearch Wiki's article on Virginia Land and Property to help you find and evaluate the original records. Using the advice in the FamilySearch wiki, you can ...


3

The entry would appear to read: 22 Harrison Monday (L free) In this context, I think "L free" is an abbreviation for "Levy Free". This seems to be confirmed by comparison with other Virginia tax records. For example, in Personal Property Tax Lists of Buckingham County, Virginia 1764-1792, or those transcribed on this list of Personal Property Tax Lists ...


3

I think that you are right. The fourth name is John Brizendine.


3

I can't speak intelligently to the question of whether or why the first entry is a reference to Isaac Brizendine's estate, although the quote that WilliamKF added seems to provide an answer to that question. As far as the second entry goes, I believe it is for Isaac Brizendine Jr. Specifically, to me, the first letter of the last word appears to be very ...


3

NFP, RC is a place abbreviation for North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia. NC DC Ord Etc:363, I believe is a source or case citation. This is the Original Book the record came from. It's only available as a rare book now. Title Married Well and Often: Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1649-1800 : Marriages and Marriage References for ...


3

The suffix "Junior" could have been used for a number of reasons, none of which are particularly specific to the United States or Scotland. There is not and has never been a formal definition of its use. The main idea is that there was a need to differentiate between two people of the same name - usually this is because there is a father and son of the same ...


3

I don't have access to the book, but some of these things can be worked out, I think. Genealogyresources.org has numerous full and substitute Virginia census records (for purchase, but with summaries online). As an example, the page for Halifax County notes: The early laws required ... the names of the person chargeable with the tax, the names of white male ...


3

If you search for the words "orphan" and "bound to" in Google Books, you will find extracts like the following from http://books.google.com.au/books?id=xxdZK9jPRdwC&pg=PA144&lpg=PA144 The connection to apprenticeship is quite clear; although the notion of a legally binding obligation can exist in other settings.


2

I think it may possibly mean bound to John Hicks as an apprentice. The term "bound to" is often used in relation to apprenticeships, and I don't recollect seeing it in any other fashion (which doesn't mean it isn't used in any other way) and that apprenticing orphans to someone was a typical thing to happen in this era to ensure they were looked after.


2

The prior section has another set of abbreviations for books: MRC Marriages of Richmond County Virginia 1668–1853 by George H. S. King.


1

The abbreviations are as follows: Leg. - legacy, legacies OR Legatee (the person receiving a legacy) D. - Death or dated (surely death in this example) Ex. - Executor R. - Register: sometimes this is date, register number and folio number but here it is just the date. Wit. - Witnesses


1

Here it is again in 1809: And in 1810: In 1811: So it appears that Bethuel is correct. Bethuel is an Aramean name from the bible.


1

The guesswork can be eliminated by using other sources. For example, the Bute County, North Carolina Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1767-1779 makes the meaning of the bond very clear: 13 February 1771 Ordered that Robert Sammons orphan of John Sammons be bound to John Hicks Sen'r untill he attain to the age of twenty one years, ...


1

Searching the online edition of Black's Law Dictionary for the phrase "bound to" resulted in the definition for BOUND: As an adjective, denotes the condition of being constrained by the obligations of a bond or a covenant. On RootsWeb there is a transcript of a talk "What Genealogists should know about 18th Century Virginia Law" presented November 17, ...


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